furrow vs rut what difference

what is difference between furrow and rut

English

Etymology

From Middle English furgh, forow, from Old English furh, from Proto-West Germanic *furh, from Proto-Germanic *furhs (compare Saterland Frisian Fuurge, Dutch voor, German Furche, Swedish fåra, Norwegian Bokmål fure), from Proto-Indo-European *perḱ- (to dig).

Compare Welsh rhych (furrow), Latin porca (ridge, balk), Lithuanian prapar̃šas (ditch), Sanskrit पर्शान (párśāna, chasm).

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈfʌɹoʊ/, /ˈfɝoʊ/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈfʌɹəʊ/
  • (accents without the “Hurry-furry” merger)
  • (accents with the “Hurry-furry” merger)
  • Rhymes: -ʌɹəʊ

Noun

furrow (plural furrows)

  1. A trench cut in the soil, as when plowed in order to plant a crop.
    Don’t walk across that deep furrow in the field.
  2. Any trench, channel, or groove, as in wood or metal.
  3. A deep wrinkle in the skin of the face, especially on the forehead.
    When she was tired, a deep furrow appeared on her forehead.

Derived terms

  • furrowless
  • furrowlike
  • furrowy

Translations

Verb

furrow (third-person singular simple present furrows, present participle furrowing, simple past and past participle furrowed)

  1. (transitive) To cut one or more grooves in (the ground, etc.).
  2. (transitive) To wrinkle.
  3. (transitive) To pull one’s brows or eyebrows together due to concentration, worry, etc.
    Synonym: frown

Derived terms

  • furrower
  • furrowing
  • unfurrow
  • unfurrowed

Translations

See also

  • plough a lonely furrow


English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɹʌt/

Etymology 1

From Middle English rutte (noun) and rutten (verb), from Old French rut (noise, roar, bellowing), from Latin rugītus, from rugīre (to roar).

Noun

rut (plural ruts)

  1. (zoology) Sexual desire or oestrus of cattle, and various other mammals. [from early 15th c.]
  2. The noise made by deer during sexual excitement.
  3. Roaring, as of waves breaking upon the shore; rote.
Translations

Verb

rut (third-person singular simple present ruts, present participle rutting, simple past and past participle rutted)

  1. (intransitive) To be in the annual rut or mating season.
  2. (intransitive) To have sexual intercourse.
  3. (transitive, rare) To have sexual intercourse with.
    • What piety forbids the lusty ram
      Or more salacious goat to rut their dam
Synonyms
  • (be in mating season): blissom, brim, bull, oestruate
  • (have sexual intercourse): do it, get some, have sex; see also Thesaurus:copulate
  • (have sexual intercourse with): coitize, go to bed with, sleep with; see also Thesaurus:copulate with
Translations

Etymology 2

Probably from Middle English route, from Middle French route (road), from Old French route. See also rutter.

Noun

rut (plural ruts)

  1. A furrow, groove, or track worn in the ground, as from the passage of many wheels along a road. [from 16th c.]
    Synonyms: groove, furrow
  2. (figuratively) A fixed routine, procedure, line of conduct, thought or feeling. [from 19th c.]
    Synonym: routine
  3. (figuratively) A dull routine.
Translations

Verb

rut (third-person singular simple present ruts, present participle rutting, simple past and past participle rutted)

  1. (transitive) To make a furrow.
Translations

Further reading

  • Rut on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Anagrams

  • RTU, URT, UTR, tur

Central Franconian

Alternative forms

  • rot (southern Moselle Franconian and Siegerland)

Etymology

From Old High German rōt.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʀuːt/

Adjective

rut (masculine rude or ruhe, feminine rut or ruh, comparative ruder or ruher, superlative et rutste)

  1. (Ripuarian, northern Moselle Franconian) red

Usage notes

  • The inflections with loss of -d- are restricted to westernmost Ripuarian.

French

Etymology

From Old French rut, ruit, inherited from Latin rugītus. Doublet of rugi, past participle of rugir.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʁyt/

Noun

rut m (plural ruts)

  1. rut (sexual excitement)

Derived terms

  • en rut

Further reading

  • “rut” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Hungarian

Alternative forms

  • rút

Etymology

An onomatopoeia.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈrut]
  • Hyphenation: rut
  • Rhymes: -ut

Interjection

rut

  1. gobble (representation of the sound of a turkey; can be used repetitively)

Vilamovian

Etymology

From Middle High German rōt (red, red-haired), from Old High German rōt (red, scarlet, purple-red, brown-red, yellow-red), from Proto-West Germanic *raud, from Proto-Germanic *raudaz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁rewdʰ-.

Akin to German rot, Old Saxon rōd, Old Dutch rōd (modern Dutch rood)

Adjective

rūt

  1. red

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial