furtive vs sneaky what difference

what is difference between furtive and sneaky

English

Etymology

Borrowed from French furtif (stealthy), from Latin fūrtīvus (stolen), from fūrtum (theft), from fūr (thief).

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈfɜːtɪv/
  • (General Australian) IPA(key): [ˈfɜːɾɪv]
  • (US) IPA(key): [ˈfɝ.ɽɪv]

Adjective

furtive (comparative more furtive, superlative most furtive)

  1. Stealthy.
  2. Exhibiting guilty or evasive secrecy.
    • 1949, George Orwell, Nineteen Eighty-Four, p31
      But that was merely a piece of furtive knowledge which he happened to possess because his memory was not satisfactorily under control.

Synonyms

  • (stealthy): surreptitious
  • See also Thesaurus:covert

Derived terms

  • furtively
  • furtiveness

Related terms

  • ferret

Translations


French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fyʁ.tiv/

Adjective

furtive

  1. feminine singular of furtif

Italian

Adjective

furtive

  1. feminine plural of furtivo

Latin

Adjective

fūrtīve

  1. masculine vocative singular of fūrtīvus

References

  • furtive in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • furtive in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • furtive in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette


English

Etymology

From sneak +‎ -y.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈsniːki/
  • Rhymes: -iːki

Adjective

sneaky (comparative sneakier, superlative sneakiest)

  1. Difficult to catch due to constantly outwitting the adversaries
    Catching those thieves will be hard: they’re so sneaky!
  2. Dishonest; deceitful.
    They played a sneaky trick on us.

Synonyms

  • slippery
  • evasive, dodgy

Derived terms

  • sneaky suspicion

Related terms

  • sneak

Translations

Further reading

  • sneaky in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • sneaky in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Noun

sneaky (plural sneakies)

  1. (espionage, slang) Any device used for covert surveillance.
    • 1974, Miles Copeland, Without cloak or dagger: the truth about the new espionage (page 244)
      [] in cooperation with the National Security Agency, installs and maintains “sneakies” throughout the U.S.S.R. and Communist China — but increasingly, denied areas are surveyed more simply.
    • 1991, Chapman Pincher, The Truth about Dirty Tricks
      [] has used travellers to plant ‘sneakies’ – small electronic transmitting devices which form part of a surveillance network.

Anagrams

  • Kaysen, Sankey, Yankes, snakey

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