fusion vs merger what difference

what is difference between fusion and merger

English

Etymology

1555, from Middle French fusion, from Latin fūsiōnem (the accusative of fūsiō), from fusus, past participle of fundō (I pour, I melt) (see also found). Doublet of foison.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈfjuː.ʒən/
  • Rhymes: -uːʒən

Noun

fusion (countable and uncountable, plural fusions)

  1. The act of merging separate elements, or the result thereof.
    1. (physics) A nuclear reaction in which nuclei combine to form more massive nuclei with the concomitant release of energy.
    2. (music) A style of music that blends disparate genres; especially types of jazz.
    3. A style of cooking that combines ingredients and techniques from different countries or cultures
    4. The act of melting or liquefying something by heating it.
    5. (genetics) The result of the hybridation of two genes which originally coded for separate proteins.
    6. (cytology) The process by which two distinct lipid bilayers merge their hydrophobic core, resulting in one interconnected structure.
    7. (fiction) The act of two characters merging into one, typically more powerful, being; or the merged being itself.

Antonyms

  • (nuclear reaction in which nuclei combine): fission

Derived terms

  • fusion reactor
  • fusion torch
  • reggae fusion
  • jazz fusion
  • nuclear fusion

Related terms

  • fuse

Translations

Verb

fusion (third-person singular simple present fusions, present participle fusioning, simple past and past participle fusioned)

  1. (nonstandard) to combine; to fuse

French

Etymology

From Middle French fusion, from Old French fusion, a borrowing from Latin fūsiō, fūsiōnem. Doublet of foison.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fy.zjɔ̃/

Noun

fusion f (plural fusions)

  1. (physics, chemistry) fusion (act of melting or liquefying something by heating it)
  2. (figuratively) mix; mixture
  3. (nuclear physics) fusion
    Antonym: fission

Derived terms

  • en fusion
  • point de fusion

Further reading

  • “fusion” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Middle French

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin fūsiō, fūsiōnem.

Noun

fusion f (plural fusions)

  1. fusion (act of melting or liquefying something by heating it)

Descendants

  • English: fusion
  • French: fusion

Swedish

Etymology

From Latin fusiō, fusiōnem.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fɵˈɧuːn/

Noun

fusion c

  1. (physics) nuclear fusion
  2. The process whereby two companies merge to become one.

Declension

See also

  • fission

References

  • fusion in Svensk ordbok (SO)


English

Pronunciation

  • (General American) enPR: mûrʹjər, IPA(key): /ˈmɝdʒɚ/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈmɜːdʒə/
  • Rhymes: -ɜː(ɹ)dʒə(ɹ)
  • Hyphenation: merg‧er

Etymology 1

From merge +‎ -er.

Noun

merger (plural mergers)

  1. One that merges.

Etymology 2

Anglo-Norman merger (verb used as noun)

Noun

merger (plural mergers)

  1. The act or process of merging two or more parts into a single unit.
    Club mergers reduced the number of teams by half
  2. (economics) The legal union of two or more corporations into a single entity, typically assets and liabilities being assumed by the buying party.
  3. (law) An absorption of one or more estate(s) or contract(s) into one other, all being held by the same owner; of several counts of accusation into one judgement, etc.
  4. (phonology) A type of sound change where two or more sounds merge into one.
    the cot-caught merger
Synonyms
  • combination
  • fusion
  • (linguistics): phonemic merger
Antonyms
  • division
Derived terms
Related terms
  • mergence
Translations

See also

  • alliance
  • buyout
  • sellout
  • takeover

References

  • merger at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • merger in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

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