fuss vs niggle what difference

what is difference between fuss and niggle

English

Etymology

Of unknown origin. Perhaps from Danish fjas (nonsense), from Middle Low German (compare German faseln (to maunder, talk nonsense))

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fʌs/
  • Rhymes: -ʌs

Noun

fuss (countable and uncountable, plural fusses)

  1. (countable or uncountable) Excessive activity, worry, bother, or talk about something.
    • 1882, Thomas Carlyle, Reminiscences
  2. A complaint or noise; a scene.
  3. An exhibition of affection or admiration.

Translations

Verb

fuss (third-person singular simple present fusses, present participle fussing, simple past and past participle fussed)

  1. (intransitive) To be very worried or excited about something, often too much.
    His grandmother will never quit fussing over his vegetarianism.
  2. (intransitive) To fiddle; fidget; wiggle, or adjust
    Quit fussing with your hair. It looks fine.
  3. (intransitive, especially of babies) To cry or be ill-humoured.
  4. (intransitive, with over) To show affection for, especially animals.
  5. (transitive) To pet.
    He fussed the cat.

Usage notes

  • Generally used with with, over, or about.

Translations

Derived terms

  • fussbudget
  • fussbutton
  • fusspot
  • fussy
  • fuss and bother
  • no muss no fuss

References

Anagrams

  • USSF

Hungarian

Alternative forms

  • fussál

Etymology

fut (to run) +‎ -j (personal suffix)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈfuʃː]
  • Hyphenation: fuss
  • Rhymes: -uʃː

Verb

fuss

  1. second-person singular subjunctive present indefinite of fut


English

Etymology

First attested in 1599. Origin uncertain, but likely borrowed from dialectal Norwegian nigla (to be stingy, to busy oneself with trifles), ultimately from Old Norse hnøggr (stingy; miserly), related to Old English hnēaw (stingy; niggardly). More at niggard.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈnɪɡəl/
  • Rhymes: -ɪɡəl

Noun

niggle (plural niggles)

  1. A minor complaint or problem.
    Synonyms: quibble, split hairs, cavil
    • 2012, The Guardian, London 2012: Christian Taylor aims high as Phillips Idowu stays away, by Anna Kessel
      The Olympic medal contender’s back problem has been described as a “niggle” by the head coach, Charles van Commenee, but Porter’s friend and former team-mate Danielle Carruthers revealed that the injury is playing on the Briton’s mind.
  2. (obsolete) Small, cramped handwriting.

Verb

niggle (third-person singular simple present niggles, present participle niggling, simple past and past participle niggled)

  1. (transitive, obsolete) To trifle with; to deceive; to mock.
    • I shall so feed your fierce vexation , And raise your worship ‘ s storms ; I shall so niggle you , And juggle you , and fiddle you , and firk you
  2. (transitive) To use, spend, or do in a petty or trifling manner.
  3. (intransitive) To dwell too much on minor points or on trifling details.
    Synonyms: nitpick, split hairs, cavil
  4. (intransitive, chiefly Britain) To fidget, fiddle, be restless.

Derived terms

  • niggly

Translations

Anagrams

  • egling, gingle, leggin, leging

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