fuss vs pother what difference

what is difference between fuss and pother

English

Etymology

Of unknown origin. Perhaps from Danish fjas (nonsense), from Middle Low German (compare German faseln (to maunder, talk nonsense))

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fʌs/
  • Rhymes: -ʌs

Noun

fuss (countable and uncountable, plural fusses)

  1. (countable or uncountable) Excessive activity, worry, bother, or talk about something.
    • 1882, Thomas Carlyle, Reminiscences
  2. A complaint or noise; a scene.
  3. An exhibition of affection or admiration.

Translations

Verb

fuss (third-person singular simple present fusses, present participle fussing, simple past and past participle fussed)

  1. (intransitive) To be very worried or excited about something, often too much.
    His grandmother will never quit fussing over his vegetarianism.
  2. (intransitive) To fiddle; fidget; wiggle, or adjust
    Quit fussing with your hair. It looks fine.
  3. (intransitive, especially of babies) To cry or be ill-humoured.
  4. (intransitive, with over) To show affection for, especially animals.
  5. (transitive) To pet.
    He fussed the cat.

Usage notes

  • Generally used with with, over, or about.

Translations

Derived terms

  • fussbudget
  • fussbutton
  • fusspot
  • fussy
  • fuss and bother
  • no muss no fuss

References

Anagrams

  • USSF

Hungarian

Alternative forms

  • fussál

Etymology

fut (to run) +‎ -j (personal suffix)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈfuʃː]
  • Hyphenation: fuss
  • Rhymes: -uʃː

Verb

fuss

  1. second-person singular subjunctive present indefinite of fut


English

Etymology

Origin uncertain. Compare Dutch peuteren (to rummage, poke), and English potter, pudder.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈpʌðə/, /ˈpɒðə/
  • Rhymes: -ʌðə(ɹ)
  • Rhymes: -ɒðə(ɹ)

Noun

pother (countable and uncountable, plural pothers)

  1. A commotion, a tempest.
    • 1605, William Shakespeare, King Lear III.ii:
      Let the great gods, / That keep this dreadful pother o’er our heads, / Find out their enemies now.
    • 1941, Lewiston Morning Tribune, 14th of May:
      (name of the article) Flight Of Hess Causes Pother Among Germans
    • 1951, C. S. Lewis, Prince Caspian, Collins, 1998, Chapter 5,
      After some years there came a time when the Queen seemed to be ill and there was a great deal of bustle and pother about her in the castle and doctors came and the courtiers whispered.

Translations

Verb

pother (third-person singular simple present pothers, present participle pothering, simple past and past participle pothered)

  1. (intransitive) To make a bustle or stir; to be fussy.
  2. (transitive) To puzzle or perplex.

Anagrams

  • Thorpe, Topher, tephro-, thorpe

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