fuss vs spat what difference

what is difference between fuss and spat

English

Etymology

Of unknown origin. Perhaps from Danish fjas (nonsense), from Middle Low German (compare German faseln (to maunder, talk nonsense))

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fʌs/
  • Rhymes: -ʌs

Noun

fuss (countable and uncountable, plural fusses)

  1. (countable or uncountable) Excessive activity, worry, bother, or talk about something.
    • 1882, Thomas Carlyle, Reminiscences
  2. A complaint or noise; a scene.
  3. An exhibition of affection or admiration.

Translations

Verb

fuss (third-person singular simple present fusses, present participle fussing, simple past and past participle fussed)

  1. (intransitive) To be very worried or excited about something, often too much.
    His grandmother will never quit fussing over his vegetarianism.
  2. (intransitive) To fiddle; fidget; wiggle, or adjust
    Quit fussing with your hair. It looks fine.
  3. (intransitive, especially of babies) To cry or be ill-humoured.
  4. (intransitive, with over) To show affection for, especially animals.
  5. (transitive) To pet.
    He fussed the cat.

Usage notes

  • Generally used with with, over, or about.

Translations

Derived terms

  • fussbudget
  • fussbutton
  • fusspot
  • fussy
  • fuss and bother
  • no muss no fuss

References

Anagrams

  • USSF

Hungarian

Alternative forms

  • fussál

Etymology

fut (to run) +‎ -j (personal suffix)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈfuʃː]
  • Hyphenation: fuss
  • Rhymes: -uʃː

Verb

fuss

  1. second-person singular subjunctive present indefinite of fut


English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /spæt/
    • Rhymes: -æt

Etymology 1

Old English spittan, spætan.

Verb

spat

  1. simple past tense and past participle of spit

Etymology 2

Of uncertain origin; perhaps related to spit.

Noun

spat (uncountable)

  1. The spawn of shellfish, especially oysters and similar molluscs.
    • 2005, TVR Pillay & MN Kutty, Aquaculture: Principles and practices, p. 525:
      As spat-fall often occurs in areas away from environments suitable for oyster growing, the collection, transport and sale of oyster spat has developed into a separate industry.
  2. A juvenile shellfish which has attached to a hard surface.
Translations

Verb

spat (third-person singular simple present spats, present participle spatting, simple past and past participle spatted)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To spawn. Used of shellfish as above.

Etymology 3

Shortening of spatterdash, from spatter + dash. 1779.

Noun

spat (plural spats)

  1. (often in the plural) A covering or decorative covering worn over a shoe.
    Coordinate term: gaiter
  2. (automotive, Britain, Australia) A piece of bodywork that covers the upper portions of the rear tyres of a car.
    Synonym: (US) fender skirt
  3. (aviation) A drag-reducing aerodynamic fairing covering the upper portions of the tyres of an aeroplane equipped with non-retractable landing gear.
Translations

Etymology 4

1804. American English, probably imitative.

Noun

spat (plural spats)

  1. A brief argument, falling out, quarrel.
Translations

Verb

spat (third-person singular simple present spats, present participle spatting, simple past and past participle spatted)

  1. To quarrel or argue briefly.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Smart to this entry?)
Translations

Further reading

  • Oxford English Dictionary, 1884–1928, and First Supplement, 1933.

Etymology 5

Attested from 1823.

Noun

spat (plural spats)

  1. A light blow with something flat.

Translations

Verb

spat (third-person singular simple present spats, present participle spatting, simple past and past participle spatted)

  1. (transitive and intransitive) To strike with a spattering sound.
    • 1922, B. M. Bower, The Trail of the White Mule, ch. 3:
      He felt the wind of a second bullet that spatted against a boulder near Barney.
    • 2007, Nolan Clay, “Co-workers testify about Kelsey’s mother,” Daily Oklahoman, 13 July, (retrieved 25 Aug. 2009):
      “She mentioned she had spatted Kelsey on her diaper with a hairbrush,” said Mildred Johnson, a co-worker.
  2. (US, dialect) To slap, as with the open hand; to clap together, as the hands.
    • 1845, Sylvester Judd, Margaret
      Little Isabel leaped up and down, spatting her hands.
Translations

Etymology 6

Latin spatium (space)

Noun

spat (plural spats)

  1. An obsolete unit of distance in astronomy (symbol S), equal to one billion kilometres.

Anagrams

  • APTS, APTs, ATSP, PATs, PSAT, PTAs, PTSA, Pats, TAPs, TPAs, Taps, ap’ts, apts, past, pats, stap, taps

Amis

Etymology

From Proto-Austronesian *Səpat.

Numeral

spat

  1. four

Danish

Etymology

From Middle Low German spat. Compare German Spat and Swedish spatt.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /spat/, [sb̥ad̥]

Noun

spat c (singular definite spatten, not used in plural form)

  1. spavin (disease of horses characterized by a bony swelling developed on the hock as the result of inflammation of the bones)
  2. få spat – get annoyed or angry

Derived terms

  • spattet

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /spɑt/
  • Hyphenation: spat
  • Rhymes: -ɑt

Etymology 1

From Middle Dutch spat.

Noun

spat m (plural spatten)

  1. (obsolete) blowgun
    Synonyms: blaaspijp, blaasroer

Etymology 2

From spatten.

Noun

spat m (plural spatten, diminutive spatje n)

  1. spot, speckle, stain
Derived terms
  • bloedspat
Descendants
  • Papiamentu: spat

Etymology 3

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

spat

  1. first-, second- and third-person singular present indicative of spatten
  2. imperative of spatten

Anagrams

  • past, stap, taps

Lower Sorbian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [spat]

Verb

spat

  1. supine of spaś

Serbo-Croatian

Verb

spat

  1. Short form of spavati: “Cili Trogir ide spat” = “Cijeli Trogir ide spati” = “The whole City of Trogir goes to sleep”

Taroko

Etymology

From Proto-Atayalic *səpat, from Proto-Austronesian *Səpat.

Numeral

spat

  1. four

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