fuss vs tiff what difference

what is difference between fuss and tiff

English

Etymology

Of unknown origin. Perhaps from Danish fjas (nonsense), from Middle Low German (compare German faseln (to maunder, talk nonsense))

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fʌs/
  • Rhymes: -ʌs

Noun

fuss (countable and uncountable, plural fusses)

  1. (countable or uncountable) Excessive activity, worry, bother, or talk about something.
    • 1882, Thomas Carlyle, Reminiscences
  2. A complaint or noise; a scene.
  3. An exhibition of affection or admiration.

Translations

Verb

fuss (third-person singular simple present fusses, present participle fussing, simple past and past participle fussed)

  1. (intransitive) To be very worried or excited about something, often too much.
    His grandmother will never quit fussing over his vegetarianism.
  2. (intransitive) To fiddle; fidget; wiggle, or adjust
    Quit fussing with your hair. It looks fine.
  3. (intransitive, especially of babies) To cry or be ill-humoured.
  4. (intransitive, with over) To show affection for, especially animals.
  5. (transitive) To pet.
    He fussed the cat.

Usage notes

  • Generally used with with, over, or about.

Translations

Derived terms

  • fussbudget
  • fussbutton
  • fusspot
  • fussy
  • fuss and bother
  • no muss no fuss

References

Anagrams

  • USSF

Hungarian

Alternative forms

  • fussál

Etymology

fut (to run) +‎ -j (personal suffix)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈfuʃː]
  • Hyphenation: fuss
  • Rhymes: -uʃː

Verb

fuss

  1. second-person singular subjunctive present indefinite of fut


English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tɪf/
  • Rhymes: -ɪf

Etymology 1

Originally, a sniff, sniffing; compare Icelandic word for a smell.

Noun

tiff (plural tiffs)

  1. A small argument; a petty quarrel.
  2. Liquor; especially, a small draught of liquor.
Translations

Verb

tiff (third-person singular simple present tiffs, present participle tiffing, simple past and past participle tiffed)

  1. (intransitive) To quarrel.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:squabble
    • 1846, Walter Savage Landor, untitled
      She tiff’d at Tim, she ran from Ralph.
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English tiffen, Old French tiffer, tifer (“to bedizen”; > Modern French attifer), from Frankish *tipfōn, *tippōn (to decorate), perhaps related to Proto-Germanic *tuppaz (top, tip). Compare Dutch tippen (to clip the points or ends of the hair), Old Norse tippa (point, tip), English tip (noun), Middle High German zipfen (to prance; skip; sashay; bob; flutter; frisk).

Verb

tiff (third-person singular simple present tiffs, present participle tiffing, simple past and past participle tiffed)

  1. (obsolete, transitive) To deck out; to dress.
    • 1768-1777, Abraham Tucker, The Light of Nature Pursued
      Is the Miss under a force when she culls among her trinkets with curious toil to tiff herself out in the most engaging manner

Etymology 3

Verb

tiff (third-person singular simple present tiffs, present participle tiffing, simple past and past participle tiffed)

  1. (British India, intransitive) To have lunch.
    • 1841, The Asiatic journal and monthly register
      Besides that one to which the permanent residence was attached, Mr. Augustus had several outlaying factories, which he visited from time to time, to superintend the manufacture of his indigo; at all of these he had little bungalows, or temporary abodes, where we tiffed and passed the heat of the day.
Related terms
  • tiffin

Etymology 4

Noun

tiff (plural tiffs)

  1. Alternative form of TIFF

References

Anagrams

  • fift

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