futile vs otiose what difference

what is difference between futile and otiose

English

Etymology

From Middle French futile, from Latin fūtilis.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈfjuː.taɪl/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈfju.taɪ.əl/, /ˈfju.təl/
  • Rhymes: -uːtəl (US)

Adjective

futile (comparative more futile, superlative most futile)

  1. Incapable of producing results; doomed not to be successful; not worth attempting.

Synonyms

  • useless, see also Thesaurus:futile

Antonyms

  • effectual
  • effective
  • fruitful

Related terms

  • futility
  • futilitarian

Translations


French

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin fūtilis.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /fy.til/
  • Rhymes: -il

Adjective

futile (plural futiles)

  1. futile

Related terms

  • futilité

Further reading

  • “futile” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Italian

Etymology

From Latin fūtilis (futile, worthless, literally that easily pours out).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈfu.ti.le/
  • Rhymes: -utile
  • Hyphenation: fù‧ti‧le

Adjective

futile (plural futili)

  1. futile, frivolous, worthless

Derived terms

  • futilmente

Related terms

  • futilità

References

  • futile in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell’Enciclopedia Italiana

Anagrams

  • fluite

Latin

Etymology 1

Alternative forms

  • futtile

Adverb

fūtile (not comparable)

  1. in vain
Synonyms
  • frustrā
  • in cassum

Etymology 2

Adjective

fūtile

  1. nominative neuter singular of fūtilis
  2. accusative neuter singular of fūtilis
  3. vocative neuter singular of fūtilis

References

  • futile in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • futile in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • futile in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette


English

Etymology

From Latin ōtiōsus (idle), from ōtium (ease)

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈəʊ.ʃi.əʊs/ or /ˈəʊ.ti.əʊs/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈoʊ.ʃi.oʊs/ or /ˈoʊ.ti.oʊs/
  • IPA(key): /ˈoʊ.ʃi.əs/

Adjective

otiose (comparative more otiose, superlative most otiose)

  1. Having no effect.
  2. Done in a careless or perfunctory manner.
  3. Reluctant to work or to exert oneself.
  4. Of a person, possessing a bored indolence.
  5. Having no reason for being (raison d’être); having no point, reason, or purpose.
    • 1895, Robert Louis Stevenson, Vailima Letters, ch 3
      On Friday morning, I had to be at my house affairs before seven; and they kept me in Apia till past ten, disputing, and consulting about brick and stone and native and hydraulic lime, and cement and sand, and all sorts of otiose details about the chimney – just what I fled from in my father’s office twenty years ago;

Synonyms

  • (resulting in no effect): futile, ineffective
  • (reluctant to work): indolent, lazy, sluggish
  • (having no reason or purpose): superfluous, irrelevant, pointless

Antonyms

  • (resulting in no effect): productive, useful
  • (reluctant to work): hardworking
  • (having no reason or purpose): essential, necessary

Derived terms

  • otiosely
  • otioseness
  • otiosity

Related terms

  • negotiate
  • negotiation

Translations


Latin

Adjective

ōtiōse

  1. vocative masculine singular of ōtiōsus

References

  • otiose in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • otiose in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • otiose in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette

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