gab vs yak what difference

what is difference between gab and yak

English

Etymology

From Middle English gabben, from Old English gabban (to scoff, mock, delude, jest) and Old Norse gabba (to mock, make sport of); both from Proto-Germanic *gabbōną (to mock, jest), from Proto-Indo-European *ghabh- (to be split, be forked, gape). Cognate with Scots gab (to mock, prate), North Frisian gabben (to jest, sport), Middle Dutch gabben (to mock), Middle Low German gabben (to jest, have fun).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡæb/
  • Rhymes: -æb

Noun

gab (countable and uncountable, plural gabs)

  1. Idle chatter.
  2. The mouth or gob.
  3. One of the open-forked ends of rods controlling reversing in early steam engines.

Synonyms

  • See also Thesaurus:talkative

Derived terms

  • bafflegab
  • begab
  • gabby
  • gift of the gab

Translations

Verb

gab (third-person singular simple present gabs, present participle gabbing, simple past and past participle gabbed)

  1. (intransitive, obsolete) To jest; to tell lies in jest; exaggerate; lie.
  2. (intransitive) To talk or chatter a lot, usually on trivial subjects.
  3. (transitive, obsolete) To speak or tell falsely.

Translations

Anagrams

  • ABG, AGB, BGA, GBA, bag

Amanab

Noun

gab

  1. a large dove

Danish

Etymology

From Old Norse gap, verbal noun to gapa (to gape).

Noun

gab n (singular definite gabet, plural indefinite gab)

  1. mouth, jaws
  2. yawn
  3. gap

Inflection


German

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡaːp/
  • Rhymes: -aːp

Verb

gab

  1. first/third-person singular preterite of geben

Old French

Alternative forms

  • gaab
  • gap

Etymology

Borrowed from Old Norse gabb.

Noun

gab m (oblique plural gas, nominative singular gas, nominative plural gab)

  1. joke

Related terms

  • gaber

References

  • Godefroy, Frédéric, Dictionnaire de l’ancienne langue française et de tous ses dialectes du IXe au XVe siècle (1881) (gab)
  • gab on the Anglo-Norman On-Line Hub


English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /jæk/
  • Rhymes: -æk
  • Homophone: yack

Etymology 1

Borrowed from Tibetan གཡག (g.yag), from Proto-Sino-Tibetan *g-jak ~ g-jaŋ.

Noun

yak (plural yak or yaks)

  1. An ox-like mammal native to the Himalayas, Mongolia, Burma, and Tibet with dark, long, and silky hair, a horse-like tail, and a full, bushy mane.
    • 2008, Scott R. R. Haskell, Blackwell’s Five-Minute Veterinary Consult: Ruminant, John Wiley & Sons (→ISBN), page 619
      Utilization efficiency of dietary protein in the yak differs with diet composition and feeding level, age, sex, body condition score, and animal production level (e.g., growth, lactation). Researchers reported no difference between lactating and dry cows in crude protein digestibility, although lactating yak tend to consume more feed than dry yak.
    • 2004, Wilson G. Pond, Encyclopedia of Animal Science (Print), CRC Press (→ISBN), page 899
      Attempts are now being made, by selection, to create a new breed of yak (the Datong yak) from such crosses. Hybridization of domestic yak with local cattle, at intermediate elevations, has been practiced for generations. The hybrids inherit some of the good characteristics from each species, but lack the adaptation of the yak to the harsh conditions at higher elevations.
Hyponyms
  • Bos mutus
  • Bos grunniens
  • Bos mutus grunniens, wild yak
  • Poephagus grunniens, domestic yak
Derived terms
  • domestic yak
  • wild yak
  • yak lace
  • yakless
  • yaklike
  • yak shaving
  • yakskin
Translations

Etymology 2

Apparently an onomatopoeia.

Alternative forms

  • yack

Verb

yak (third-person singular simple present yaks, present participle yakking, simple past and past participle yakked)

  1. (slang, intransitive) To talk, particularly informally but persistently; to chatter or prattle.
    • 1960, P. G. Wodehouse, Jeeves in the Offing, chapter XI
      “You’ll like Poppet. Nice dog. Wears his ears inside out. Why do dachshunds wear their ears inside out?” “I could not say, sir.” “Nor me. I’ve often wondered. But this won’t do, Jeeves. Here we are, yakking about Jezebels and dachshunds, when we ought to be concentrating our minds []
  2. (slang, intransitive) To vomit, usually as a result of excessive alcohol consumption.
Translations

Noun

yak (countable and uncountable, plural yaks)

  1. (slang) A talk, particular an informal talk; chattering; gossip.
    • 1983, Nicolas Freeling, The Back of the North Wind (→ISBN)
      The sudden head-down butt jabbed into someone’s face, is a highly effective way of putting a stop to his yack.
  2. (slang) A laugh.
    • 1951, Fredric Brown and Mack Reynolds, Cartoonist
      Would-be gags from would-be gagsters. And, nine chances out of ten, not a yak in the lot.
  3. (slang) Vomit.
Translations

Related terms

  • yackety-yak
  • yakfest
  • yakky

Etymology 3

Shortening.

Noun

yak (plural yaks)

  1. (slang) A kayak.

Anagrams

  • ‘kay, Kay, kay, kya

Choctaw

Adverb

yak

  1. thus

References

  • Cyrus Byington, A Dictionary of the Choctaw Language

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /jɑk/
  • Hyphenation: yak
  • Rhymes: -ɑk

Noun

yak m (plural yakken or yaks, diminutive yakje n)

  1. Alternative spelling of jak

French

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -jak

Noun

yak m (plural yaks)

  1. Alternative spelling of yack

Further reading

  • “yak” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Italian

Etymology

From Tibetan གཡག (g.yag), from Proto-Sino-Tibetan *g-jak ~ g-jaŋ.

Noun

yak m (invariable)

  1. a yak (bovine)
    Synonym: bue tibetano


Kokborok

Alternative forms

  • jak

Etymology

From Proto-Bodo-Garo *yak (hand; arm). Cognate with Garo jak (hand).

Noun

yak

  1. hand

References

  • Debbarma, Binoy (2001), “yak”, in Concise Kokborok-English-Bengali Dictionary, Language Wing, Education Department, TTAADC, →ISBN, page 142

Manx

Etymology

Borrowed from English yak, from Tibetan གཡག (g.yag), from Proto-Sino-Tibetan *g-jak ~ g-jaŋ.

Noun

yak m (genitive singular yak, plural yakkyn)

  1. yak

Savi

Etymology

From Sanskrit एक (eka).

Numeral

yak

  1. (cardinal) one

References

  • Nina Knobloch (2020) A grammar sketch of Sauji: An Indo-Aryan language of Afghanistan[1], Stockholm University

Spanish

Alternative forms

  • yac

Etymology

From Tibetan གཡག (g.yag), from Proto-Sino-Tibetan *g-jak ~ g-jaŋ.

Pronunciation

Noun

yak m (plural yak or yaks)

  1. yak (bovine)

Tagalog

Etymology

From English yuck.

Interjection

yak

  1. An expression to indicate disgust.
  2. yuck!

Synonyms

  • kadiri

Turkish

Etymology

From Tibetan གཡག (g.yag), from Proto-Sino-Tibetan *g-jak ~ g-jaŋ.

Noun

yak (definite accusative yakı, plural yaklar)

  1. yak (ox-like mammal)

Synonyms

  • Tibet öküzü
  • Tibet sığırı

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