gabardine vs tweed what difference

what is difference between gabardine and tweed

English

Alternative forms

  • gaberdine
  • garbardine

Etymology

Recorded since 1904, altering the earlier gaberdine (long, coarse outer garment) (since 1520), from Spanish gabardina (perhaps influenced by gabán (overcoat) and tabardina (coarse coat)), from Middle French galverdine, itself probably from (Old or Middle) High German wallevart (pilgrimage), in the sense of “pilgrim’s cloak” (from wallen (to ambulate) + vart (journey)).

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈɡæbəˌdiːn/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈɡæbɚˌdin/

Noun

gabardine (usually uncountable, plural gabardines)

  1. (uncountable, countable) A type of woolen cloth with a diagonal ribbed texture on one side.
  2. (uncountable, countable) A similar fabric, made from cotton.
  3. (countable) A gaberdine (garment).
  4. (countable, historical) A yellow robe that Jews in England were compelled to wear in the year 1189 as a mark of distinction.

    You call me misbeliever, cut-throat dog,
    And spet upon my Jewish gabardine,

    And all for use of that which is mine own.

Translations

Further reading

  • gabardine on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Anagrams

  • bargained

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from English gabardine.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɣɑ.bɑrˈdi.nə/

Adjective

gabardine (not comparable)

  1. made from gabardine

Inflection

Noun

gabardine f (plural gabardines, diminutive gabardinetje n)

  1. The woolen (cloth) Gabardine
  2. An overcoat or raincoat (of this material)

References

  • “gabardine” in Woordenlijst Nederlandse Taal – Officiële Spelling, Nederlandse Taalunie. [the official spelling word list for the Dutch language]

French

Etymology

Borrowed from Spanish gabardina (perhaps influenced by gabán (overcoat) and tabardina (coarse coat)), from Middle French galverdine, itself probably from (Old or Middle) High German wallevart (pilgrimage), in the sense of “pilgrim’s cloak”

Pronunciation

Noun

gabardine f (plural gabardines)

  1. The woolen cloth gaberdine
  2. A long coat with sleeves, notably a raincoat

Further reading

  • “gabardine” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Italian

Etymology

Borrowed from French, from Spanish gabardina (perhaps influenced by gabán (overcoat) and tabardina (coarse coat)), from Middle French galverdine, itself probably from (Old or Middle) High German wallevart (pilgrimage) in the sense of “pilgrim’s cloak”.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡa.barˈdi.ne/

Noun

gabardine m (invariable)

  1. the woolen cloth gabardine
  2. an overcoat or raincoat, (originally) of this material

Portuguese

Noun

gabardine f (plural gabardines)

  1. Alternative form of gabardina


English

Etymology

Attested since the 1830s. Probably a shortening or back-formation from Scots tweedling (a type of twilled cloth), attested since the 16th century and related to tweedle; the two words are variants of tweeling and tweel, which go back to Middle English twel, twyle (a type of woven fabric; twill), whence also English twill. Scottish tradition says it derives directly from tweel when an English merchant misread tweels or tweeled (cloth) in an 1831 letter from a Scottish merchant as Tweed(s) and took it to be a trade-name based on the River Tweed, but the DSL says evidence for this is lacking, and because English merchants must have been familiar with tweel(ed cloth) before the 1830s, it seems unlikely to be based on misunderstanding tweel rather than on the well-attested tweedle. Several of the earliest citations, from 1839, 1841, and 1845 treat it as a new name for a familiar cloth.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /twiːd/
  • Rhymes: -iːd

Noun

tweed (countable and uncountable, plural tweeds)

  1. A coarse woolen fabric used for clothing.
    • 1839, Great Britain. Central Criminal Court, Central Criminal Court. Minutes of Evidence, page 75:
      MICHAEL NOWAK, alias John Mazurkiewiez, was indicted for stealing, on the 15th of April, 2 1/4 yards of woollen cloth, called tweed, value 12s., and 2 1/4 yards of woollen cloth, called doe-skin, value 17s., []

Translations

References

Anagrams

  • dewet, dweet, tewed

Finnish

Etymology

Unadapted borrowing from English tweed.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈtʋiːdi/, [ˈt̪ʋiːdi]

Noun

tweed

  1. tweed (fabric)

Declension

Synonyms

  • tweedkangas

Derived terms


French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /twid/

Noun

tweed m (uncountable)

  1. tweed

Further reading

  • “tweed” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Portuguese

Noun

tweed m (uncountable)

  1. tweed (coarse woolen fabric)

Spanish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈtwid/, [ˈt̪wið̞]

Noun

tweed m (uncountable)

  1. tweed

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