gabardine vs white what difference

what is difference between gabardine and white

English

Alternative forms

  • gaberdine
  • garbardine

Etymology

Recorded since 1904, altering the earlier gaberdine (long, coarse outer garment) (since 1520), from Spanish gabardina (perhaps influenced by gabán (overcoat) and tabardina (coarse coat)), from Middle French galverdine, itself probably from (Old or Middle) High German wallevart (pilgrimage), in the sense of “pilgrim’s cloak” (from wallen (to ambulate) + vart (journey)).

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈɡæbəˌdiːn/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈɡæbɚˌdin/

Noun

gabardine (usually uncountable, plural gabardines)

  1. (uncountable, countable) A type of woolen cloth with a diagonal ribbed texture on one side.
  2. (uncountable, countable) A similar fabric, made from cotton.
  3. (countable) A gaberdine (garment).
  4. (countable, historical) A yellow robe that Jews in England were compelled to wear in the year 1189 as a mark of distinction.

    You call me misbeliever, cut-throat dog,
    And spet upon my Jewish gabardine,

    And all for use of that which is mine own.

Translations

Further reading

  • gabardine on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Anagrams

  • bargained

Dutch

Etymology

Borrowed from English gabardine.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɣɑ.bɑrˈdi.nə/

Adjective

gabardine (not comparable)

  1. made from gabardine

Inflection

Noun

gabardine f (plural gabardines, diminutive gabardinetje n)

  1. The woolen (cloth) Gabardine
  2. An overcoat or raincoat (of this material)

References

  • “gabardine” in Woordenlijst Nederlandse Taal – Officiële Spelling, Nederlandse Taalunie. [the official spelling word list for the Dutch language]

French

Etymology

Borrowed from Spanish gabardina (perhaps influenced by gabán (overcoat) and tabardina (coarse coat)), from Middle French galverdine, itself probably from (Old or Middle) High German wallevart (pilgrimage), in the sense of “pilgrim’s cloak”

Pronunciation

Noun

gabardine f (plural gabardines)

  1. The woolen cloth gaberdine
  2. A long coat with sleeves, notably a raincoat

Further reading

  • “gabardine” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Italian

Etymology

Borrowed from French, from Spanish gabardina (perhaps influenced by gabán (overcoat) and tabardina (coarse coat)), from Middle French galverdine, itself probably from (Old or Middle) High German wallevart (pilgrimage) in the sense of “pilgrim’s cloak”.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡa.barˈdi.ne/

Noun

gabardine m (invariable)

  1. the woolen cloth gabardine
  2. an overcoat or raincoat, (originally) of this material

Portuguese

Noun

gabardine f (plural gabardines)

  1. Alternative form of gabardina


English

Alternative forms

  • whight, whyte, whyght (obsolete)
  • White (race-related)

Etymology

From Middle English whit, hwit, from Old English hwīt, from Proto-West Germanic *hwīt, from Proto-Germanic *hwītaz (whence also West Frisian wyt, Dutch wit, German weiß, Norwegian Bokmål hvit, Norwegian Nynorsk kvit), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱweydós, a byform of *ḱweytós (bright; shine). Compare Lithuanian šviẽsti (to gleam), šviesa (light), Old Church Slavonic свѣтъ (světŭ, light), свѣтьлъ (světĭlŭ, clear, bright), Persian سفید(sefid), Avestan ????????????????????????(spaēta, white), Sanskrit श्वेत (śvetá, white, bright).

Pronunciation

  • enPR: wīt, IPA(key): /waɪt/
  • (without the winewhine merger) enPR: hwīt, IPA(key): /ʍaɪt/
  • Rhymes: -aɪt
  • Homophones: wight, Wight, wite (accents with the wine-whine merger)

Adjective

white (comparative whiter or more white, superlative whitest or most white)

  1. Bright and colourless; reflecting equal quantities of all frequencies of visible light.
    • c. 1878, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, “Holidays”
      white as the whitest lily on a stream.
    • 1381, quoted in Hans Kurath & Sherman M. Kuhn, eds., Middle English Dictionary, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan Press, ISBN 978-0-472-01044-8, page 1242 (1961):
      dorrẹ̅, dōrī adj. & n. [] cook. glazed with a yellow substance; pome(s ~, sopes ~. [] 1381 Pegge Cook. Recipes page 114: For to make Soupys dorry. Nym onyons [] Nym wyn [] toste wyte bred and do yt in dischis, and god Almande mylk.
    Antonyms: black, nonwhite, unwhite
  2. (sometimes capitalized) Of or relating to Caucasians, people of European descent with light-coloured skin.
  3. (chiefly historical) Designated for use by Caucasians.
  4. Relatively light or pale in colour.
  5. Pale or pallid, as from fear, illness, etc.
  6. (of a person or skin) Lacking coloration (tan) from ultraviolet light; not tanned.
    Synonyms: fair, pale
    Antonym: tanned
  7. (of coffee or tea) Containing cream, milk, or creamer.
    Antonym: black
  8. (board games, chess) The standard denomination of the playing pieces of a board game deemed to belong to the white set, no matter what the actual colour.
  9. Pertaining to an ecclesiastical order whose adherents dress in white habits; Cistercian.
  10. Honourable, fair; decent.
    • White as thy fame, and as thy honour clear.
    • 1916, Julia Frankau, Twilight
      He’s a fine fellow, this Gabriel Stanton, a white man all through
    • 1953, Raymond Chandler, The Long Goodbye, Penguin, 2010, p.12:
      ‘We’ve only met twice and you’ve been more than white to me both times.’
  11. Grey, as from old age; having silvery hair; hoary.
  12. (archaic) Characterized by freedom from that which disturbs, and the like; fortunate; happy; favourable.
  13. (obsolete) Regarded with especial favour; favourite; darling.
    • Come forth, my white spouse.
    • c. 1626, John Ford, Tis Pity She’s a Whore
      I am his white boy, and will not be gulled.
  14. (politics) Pertaining to constitutional or anti-revolutionary political parties or movements.
    • 1932, Duff Cooper, Talleyrand, Folio Society, 2010, p.163:
      Aimée de Coigny had always adopted with enthusiasm the political views of her ruling lover and she had thus already held nearly every shade of opinion from red republicanism to white reaction.
  15. (of tea) Made from immature leaves and shoots.
  16. (typography) Not containing characters; see white space.
  17. (typography) Said of a symbol or character outline, not solid, not filled with color. Compare black (said of a character or symbol filled with color).
    Compare two Unicode symbols: = “WHITE RIGHT POINTING INDEX”; = “BLACK RIGHT POINTING INDEX”
  18. Characterised by the presence of snow.

Derived terms

Related terms

Descendants

  • Bislama: waet
  • Tok Pisin: wait
  • Japanese: ホワイト (howaito)
  • white fella
    • Nyunga: wadjela
  • white gin
    • Gamilaraay: waatyin
    • Ngiyambaa: wadjiin
    • Wiradhuri: waajin

Translations

See white/translations § Adjective.

Noun

white (countable and uncountable, plural whites)

  1. The color/colour of snow or milk; the colour of light containing equal amounts of all visible wavelengths.
  2. A person of European descent with light-coloured skin.
  3. Any butterfly of the family Pieridae.
  4. (countable and uncountable) White wine.
  5. (countable) Any object or substance that is of the color white.
    1. The albumen of bird eggs (egg white).
    2. (anatomy) The sclera, white of the eye.
    3. (sports, billiards, snooker, pool) The cue ball in cue games.
    4. (slang, US, MLE) Cocaine
    5. The snow- or ice-covered “green” in snow golf.
    6. A white pigment.
      Venice white
  6. (archery) The central part of the butt, which was formerly painted white; the centre of a mark at which a missile is shot.
  7. The enclosed part of a letter of the alphabet, especially when handwritten.
    • 1594, Hugh Plat, The Jewell House of Art and Nature, London, Chapter 38, p. 42,[3]
      Also it giueth a great grace to your writing, if the whites of certeine letters bee made of one equall bignesse with the o. supposing the same were all round, as the white of the b. of the a. p. y. v. w. x. q. d. g. and s.
    • 1677, Hannah Woolley, The Compleat Servant-Maid, London: T. Passinger, p. 18,[4]
      [] the a. b. d. g. o. p. q. &c. [] must be made with equal whites.
    • 1931, Margery Allingham, Police at the Funeral, Penguin, 1939, Chapter 14, p. 157,[5]
      She copied the whole alphabet like that, as though only the inside whites of the letters registered on her mind.

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

white (third-person singular simple present whites, present participle whiting, simple past and past participle whited)

  1. (transitive) To make white; to whiten; to bleach.
    • whited sepulchres, which indeed appear beautiful outward, but are within full of [] uncleanness
    • so as no fuller on earth can white them

Derived terms

  • white out

See also

  • leucite
  • leukoma
  • leukosis
  • Sauvignon blanc
  • Svetambara
  • terra alba

Further reading

  • white on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Race on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • white on Wikimedia Commons.Wikimedia Commons

Anagrams

  • withe

Middle English

Adjective

white

  1. inflection of whit:
    1. weak singular
    2. strong/weak plural
  2. Alternative form of whit

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