gabble vs jabber what difference

what is difference between gabble and jabber

English

Etymology

gab +‎ -le, frequentative.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡæbəl/
  • Rhymes: -æbəl

Verb

gabble (third-person singular simple present gabbles, present participle gabbling, simple past and past participle gabbled)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To talk fast, idly, foolishly, or without meaning.
    • 1611, William Shakespeare, The Tempest, Act I, scene II :
      I pitied thee, took pains to make thee speak, taught thee each hour one thing or other; when thou didst not, savage, know thine own meaning, but wouldst gabble like a thing most brutish
    • 2013, J. M. Coetzee, The Childhood of Jesus. Melbourne, Australia: The Text Publishing Company. chapter 16. p. 144.
      Does she regard him simply as a workman come to do a job for her, someone whom she need never lay eyes on again; or is she gabbling to hide discomfiture?
  2. To utter inarticulate sounds with rapidity.
    • 1709, John Dryden, Pastorals
      gabble like a goose

Translations

Synonyms

  • babble; See also Thesaurus:prattle

Noun

gabble (uncountable)

  1. Confused or unintelligible speech.
    • 1914, G. K. Chesterton, The Wisdom of Father Brown
      a lot of gabble from witnesses

Synonyms

  • See also Thesaurus:chatter

Yola

Etymology

Cognate with English gabble.

Noun

gabble

  1. talk, prattle

Verb

gabble

  1. talk. prattle

References

  • Jacob Poole (1867), William Barnes, editor, A Glossary, With some Pieces of Verse, of the old Dialect of the English Colony in the Baronies of Forth and Bargy, County of Wexford, Ireland, London: J. Russell Smith


English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈdʒæbə(ɹ)/
  • Rhymes: -æbə(ɹ)

Etymology 1

Imitative.

Verb

jabber (third-person singular simple present jabbers, present participle jabbering, simple past and past participle jabbered)

  1. (intransitive) To talk rapidly, indistinctly, or unintelligibly; to utter gibberish or nonsense.
    • 1829, James Hogg, The Shepherd’s Calendar, New York: A.T. Goodrich, Volume I, Chapter 9, “Mary Burnet,” p. 184,[1]
      Allanson made some sound in his throat, as if attempting to speak, but his tongue refused its office, and he only jabbered.
    • 1851, Herman Melville, Moby-Dick, Chapter 19,[2]
      “What are you jabbering about, shipmate?” said I.
  2. (transitive) To utter rapidly or indistinctly; to gabble.
    • 1939, H. G. Wells, The Holy Terror, Book One, Chapter 1, Section 2,[3]
      He wept very little, but when he wept he howled aloud, and jabbered wild abuse, threats and recriminations through the wet torrent of his howling.
Translations

Noun

jabber (uncountable)

  1. Rapid or incoherent talk, with indistinct utterance; gibberish.
    • 1735, Jonathan Swift, Gulliver’s Travels, in The Works of Jonathan Swift, edited by George Faulkner, Dublin, 1735, Volume 3, A Letter from Capt. Gulliver to his Cousin Sympson, pp. v-vi,[4]
      And, is there less Probability in my Account of the Houyhnhnms or Yahoos, when it is manifest as to the latter, there are so many Thousands even in this City, who only differ from their Brother Brutes in Houyhnhnmland, because they use a Sort of a Jabber, and do not go naked.
    • 1918, Carl Sandburg, “Jabberers” in Cornhuskers, New York: Henry Holt & Co., p. 68,[5]
      Two tongues from the depths,
      Alike only as a yellow cat and a green parrot are alike,
      Fling their staccato tantalizations
      Into a wildcat jabber
      Over a gossamer web of unanswerables.
Derived terms
  • jabberment (obsolete)
Translations

Etymology 2

jab +‎ -er

Noun

jabber (plural jabbers)

  1. One who or that which jabs.
  2. A kind of hand-operated corn planter.
    • 1999, Nicholas P. Hardeman, Across the Bloody Chasm
      The jabber was the most popular hand-operated corn planter ever devised. [] Inset shows jaws closed for jabbing (left) and open for depositing kernels (right).

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