gain vs gather what difference

what is difference between gain and gather

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡeɪn/
  • Rhymes: -eɪn

Etymology 1

From Middle English gayn, gain, gein (profit, advantage), from Old Norse gagn (benefit, advantage, use), from Proto-Germanic *gagną, *gaganą (gain, profit”, literally “return), from Proto-Germanic *gagana (back, against, in return), a reduplication of Proto-Germanic *ga- (with, together), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱóm (next to, at, with, along). Cognate with Icelandic gagn (gain, advantage, use), Swedish gagn (benefit, profit), Danish gavn (gain, profit, success), Gothic ???????????????????????????????? (gageigan, to gain, profit), Old Norse gegn (ready), dialectal Swedish gen (useful, noteful), Latin cum (with); see gain-, again, against. Compare also Middle English gaynen, geinen (to be of use, profit, avail), Icelandic and Swedish gagna (to avail, help), Danish gavne (to benefit).

The Middle English word was reinforced by Middle French gain (gain, profit, advancement, cultivation), from Old French gaaing, gaaigne, gaigne, a noun derivative of gaaignier (to till, earn, win), from Frankish *waidanjan (to pasture, graze, hunt for food), ultimately from Proto-Germanic *waiþiz, *waiþō, *waiþijō (pasture, field, hunting ground); compare Old High German weidōn, weidanōn (to hunt, forage for food) (Modern German Weide (pasture)), Old Norse veiða (to catch, hunt), Old English wǣþan (to hunt, chase, pursue). Related to wathe, wide.

Verb

gain (third-person singular simple present gains, present participle gaining, simple past and past participle gained)

  1. (transitive) To acquire possession of.
    Looks like you’ve gained a new friend.
  2. (intransitive) To have or receive advantage or profit; to acquire gain; to grow rich; to advance in interest, health, or happiness; to make progress.
    The sick man gains daily.
  3. (transitive, dated) To come off winner or victor in; to be successful in; to obtain by competition.
    to gain a battle; to gain a case at law
  4. (transitive) To increase.
    • 1883, Howard Pyle, The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood Chapter V
      Then they had bouts of wrestling and of cudgel play, so that every day they gained in skill and strength.
  5. (intransitive) To be more likely to catch or overtake an individual.
    I’m gaining (on you).
    gain ground
  6. (transitive) To reach.
    to gain the top of a mountain
    • 1907, Jack London, The Iron Heel:
      Ernest laughed harshly and savagely when he had gained the street.
  7. To draw into any interest or party; to win to one’s side; to conciliate.
    • If he shall hear thee, thou hast gained thy brother.
    • to gratify the queen, and gain the court
  8. (intransitive) To put on weight.
    I’ve been gaining.
  9. (of a clock or watch) To run fast.
Derived terms
Translations

Noun

gain (countable and uncountable, plural gains)

  1. The act of gaining; acquisition.
    • 1855, Alfred Tennyson, Maude
      the lust of gain, in the spirit of Cain
  2. What is gained.
  3. (electronics) The factor by which a signal is multiplied.
    • 1987, John Borwick, Sound recording practice (page 238)
      There follows the high and low-frequency replay equalization, which normally involves two adjustments with a further control allowing the replay gain to be set.
Antonyms
  • loss
Derived terms
  • autogain
  • gainful
  • gainsome
  • gain-ground (game)
Translations

Etymology 2

From dialectal English gen, gin, short for again, agen (against); also Middle English gain, gayn, gein, ȝæn (against), from Old English gēan, geġn (against). More at against.

Preposition

gain

  1. (obsolete) Against.
Derived terms
  • gainful

Etymology 3

From Middle English gayn, gein, geyn (straight, direct, short, fit, good), from Old Norse gegn (straight, direct, short, ready, serviceable, kindly), from gegn (opposite, against, adverb) (whence gagna (to go against, meet, suit, be meet)); see below at gain. Adverb from Middle English gayn, gayne (fitly, quickly), from the adjective.

Adjective

gain (comparative more gain, superlative most gain)

  1. (obsolete) Straight, direct; near; short.
    the gainest way
  2. (obsolete) Suitable; convenient; ready.
  3. (dialectal) Easy; tolerable; handy, dexterous.
  4. (dialectal) Honest; respectable; moderate; cheap.

Translations

Derived terms
  • gainly
  • gainsome

Adverb

gain (comparative more gain, superlative most gain)

  1. (obsolete) Straightly; quickly; by the nearest way or means.
  2. (dialectal) Suitably; conveniently; dexterously; moderately.
  3. (dialectal) Tolerably; fairly.
    gain quiet (= fairly/pretty quiet)

Etymology 4

Compare Welsh gan (a mortise).

Noun

gain (plural gains)

  1. (architecture) A square or bevelled notch cut out of a girder, binding joist, or other timber which supports a floor beam, so as to receive the end of the floor beam.

Anagrams

  • Agin, Agni, Angi, Gina, NGIA, Nagi, Ngai, a- -ing, ag’in, agin, gina, inga

Basque

Noun

gain

  1. summit

French

Etymology

From Middle French gain, from Old French gaaing, from the verb gaaignier (to earn, gain, seize, conquer by force), from Frankish *waidanjan (to graze, forage, hunt), from Proto-Germanic *waiþō (a hunt, pasture, food), from Proto-Indo-European *weyh₁- (to seek, crave, hunt). Cognate with Old High German weidanōn (to hunt, chase), German Weide (pasture, pasturage). Compare also related Old French gain (harvest time, revival), from Frankish *waida (income, food, fodder) (whence French regain), from the same Germanic source.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡɛ̃/

Noun

gain m (plural gains)

  1. (usually in the plural) winnings, earnings, takings
  2. (finance) gain, yield

Derived terms

  • gain de cause
  • gain du temps

Further reading

  • “gain” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Louisiana Creole French

Etymology

From French gagner (to gain), compare Haitian Creole gen.

Verb

gain

  1. to have

Middle English

Etymology 1

From Old Norse gegn.

Adjective

gain

  1. Alternative form of gayn (direct, fast, good, helpful)

Etymology 2

From Old Norse gagn.

Noun

gain

  1. Alternative form of gayn (gain, reward, advantage)

Etymology 3

From Old Norse gegna.

Verb

gain

  1. Alternative form of gaynen

Etymology 4

From Old English ġeġn, gæġn, from Proto-Germanic *gagin; also influenced by Old Norse gegn, from the same Proto-Germanic form. Doublet of gayn (direct, fast, good, helpful).

Alternative forms

  • gayn, gein, ȝæn, ȝein, ȝean, gayne, gen, gan, gaine, geyn

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡɛi̯n/, /ɡeːn/, /jɛi̯n/, /jeːn/

Preposition

gain

  1. against, next to, touching
  2. (figuratively) against, opposed to, counter to, opposing (usually used in religious and spiritual contexts)
  3. towards, to, nearing
  4. (rare) on, on top of
  5. (rare) facing, pointed towards
Descendants
  • English: gain (obsolete)
  • Scots: gain, gin
References
  • “yẹ̄n, prep.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-04-23.

Adverb

gain

  1. back (to), returning (to)
References
  • “yẹ̄n, adv.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-04-23.

Middle French

Etymology

Old French gaaing.

Noun

gain m (plural gains)

  1. income (financial)

Descendants

  • French: gain

References

  • gain on Dictionnaire du Moyen Français (1330–1500) (in French)

Welsh

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡai̯n/

Adjective

gain

  1. Soft mutation of cain.

Mutation


English

Alternative forms

  • gether (obsolete or regional)

Etymology

From Middle English gaderen, from Old English gaderian (to gather, assemble), from Proto-West Germanic *gadurōn (to bring together, unite, gather), from Proto-Indo-European *gʰedʰ- (to unite, assemble, keep).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈɡæðə/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈɡæðɚ/
  • Rhymes: -æðə(ɹ)

Verb

gather (third-person singular simple present gathers, present participle gathering, simple past and past participle gathered)

  1. To collect; normally separate things.
    1. Especially, to harvest food.
    2. To accumulate over time, to amass little by little.
    3. (intransitive) To congregate, or assemble.
      • ?, Alfred Tennyson, Tears
        Tears from the depth of some divine despair / Rise in the heart, and gather to the eyes.
    4. (intransitive) To grow gradually larger by accretion.
      • Their snow-ball did not gather as it went.
  2. To bring parts of a whole closer.
    1. (sewing) To add pleats or folds to a piece of cloth, normally to reduce its width.
    2. (knitting) To bring stitches closer together.
    3. (architecture) To bring together, or nearer together, in masonry, as for example where the width of a fireplace is rapidly diminished to the width of the flue.
    4. (nautical) To haul in; to take up.
  3. To infer or conclude; to know from a different source.
  4. (intransitive, medicine, of a boil or sore) To be filled with pus
  5. (glassblowing) To collect molten glass on the end of a tool.
  6. To gain; to win.

Synonyms

  • (to bring together): aggroup, togetherize; see also Thesaurus:round up
    (—to accumulate over time): accrue, add up; see also Thesaurus:accumulate
    (—to congregate): assemble, begather; see also Thesaurus:assemble

Derived terms

Translations

Noun

gather (plural gathers)

  1. A plait or fold in cloth, made by drawing a thread through it; a pucker.
  2. The inclination forward of the axle journals to keep the wheels from working outward.
  3. The soffit or under surface of the masonry required in gathering. See gather (transitive verb).
  4. (glassblowing) A blob of molten glass collected on the end of a blowpipe.
  5. A gathering.
    • 2007, John Barnes, The Sky So Big and Black (Tor Books, →ISBN):
      “I’ll tell you all about it at the Gather, win or lose.”
    • 2014, Paul Lederer, Dark Angel Riding (Open Road Media, →ISBN):
      What bothered him more, he thought as he started Washoe southward, was Spikes’s animosity, the bearded man’s sudden violent reaction to his arrival at the gather.

Derived terms

  • gathering iron

Translations

Anagrams

  • Gareth, rageth

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