gain vs win what difference

what is difference between gain and win

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡeɪn/
  • Rhymes: -eɪn

Etymology 1

From Middle English gayn, gain, gein (profit, advantage), from Old Norse gagn (benefit, advantage, use), from Proto-Germanic *gagną, *gaganą (gain, profit”, literally “return), from Proto-Germanic *gagana (back, against, in return), a reduplication of Proto-Germanic *ga- (with, together), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱóm (next to, at, with, along). Cognate with Icelandic gagn (gain, advantage, use), Swedish gagn (benefit, profit), Danish gavn (gain, profit, success), Gothic ???????????????????????????????? (gageigan, to gain, profit), Old Norse gegn (ready), dialectal Swedish gen (useful, noteful), Latin cum (with); see gain-, again, against. Compare also Middle English gaynen, geinen (to be of use, profit, avail), Icelandic and Swedish gagna (to avail, help), Danish gavne (to benefit).

The Middle English word was reinforced by Middle French gain (gain, profit, advancement, cultivation), from Old French gaaing, gaaigne, gaigne, a noun derivative of gaaignier (to till, earn, win), from Frankish *waidanjan (to pasture, graze, hunt for food), ultimately from Proto-Germanic *waiþiz, *waiþō, *waiþijō (pasture, field, hunting ground); compare Old High German weidōn, weidanōn (to hunt, forage for food) (Modern German Weide (pasture)), Old Norse veiða (to catch, hunt), Old English wǣþan (to hunt, chase, pursue). Related to wathe, wide.

Verb

gain (third-person singular simple present gains, present participle gaining, simple past and past participle gained)

  1. (transitive) To acquire possession of.
    Looks like you’ve gained a new friend.
  2. (intransitive) To have or receive advantage or profit; to acquire gain; to grow rich; to advance in interest, health, or happiness; to make progress.
    The sick man gains daily.
  3. (transitive, dated) To come off winner or victor in; to be successful in; to obtain by competition.
    to gain a battle; to gain a case at law
  4. (transitive) To increase.
    • 1883, Howard Pyle, The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood Chapter V
      Then they had bouts of wrestling and of cudgel play, so that every day they gained in skill and strength.
  5. (intransitive) To be more likely to catch or overtake an individual.
    I’m gaining (on you).
    gain ground
  6. (transitive) To reach.
    to gain the top of a mountain
    • 1907, Jack London, The Iron Heel:
      Ernest laughed harshly and savagely when he had gained the street.
  7. To draw into any interest or party; to win to one’s side; to conciliate.
    • If he shall hear thee, thou hast gained thy brother.
    • to gratify the queen, and gain the court
  8. (intransitive) To put on weight.
    I’ve been gaining.
  9. (of a clock or watch) To run fast.
Derived terms
Translations

Noun

gain (countable and uncountable, plural gains)

  1. The act of gaining; acquisition.
    • 1855, Alfred Tennyson, Maude
      the lust of gain, in the spirit of Cain
  2. What is gained.
  3. (electronics) The factor by which a signal is multiplied.
    • 1987, John Borwick, Sound recording practice (page 238)
      There follows the high and low-frequency replay equalization, which normally involves two adjustments with a further control allowing the replay gain to be set.
Antonyms
  • loss
Derived terms
  • autogain
  • gainful
  • gainsome
  • gain-ground (game)
Translations

Etymology 2

From dialectal English gen, gin, short for again, agen (against); also Middle English gain, gayn, gein, ȝæn (against), from Old English gēan, geġn (against). More at against.

Preposition

gain

  1. (obsolete) Against.
Derived terms
  • gainful

Etymology 3

From Middle English gayn, gein, geyn (straight, direct, short, fit, good), from Old Norse gegn (straight, direct, short, ready, serviceable, kindly), from gegn (opposite, against, adverb) (whence gagna (to go against, meet, suit, be meet)); see below at gain. Adverb from Middle English gayn, gayne (fitly, quickly), from the adjective.

Adjective

gain (comparative more gain, superlative most gain)

  1. (obsolete) Straight, direct; near; short.
    the gainest way
  2. (obsolete) Suitable; convenient; ready.
  3. (dialectal) Easy; tolerable; handy, dexterous.
  4. (dialectal) Honest; respectable; moderate; cheap.

Translations

Derived terms
  • gainly
  • gainsome

Adverb

gain (comparative more gain, superlative most gain)

  1. (obsolete) Straightly; quickly; by the nearest way or means.
  2. (dialectal) Suitably; conveniently; dexterously; moderately.
  3. (dialectal) Tolerably; fairly.
    gain quiet (= fairly/pretty quiet)

Etymology 4

Compare Welsh gan (a mortise).

Noun

gain (plural gains)

  1. (architecture) A square or bevelled notch cut out of a girder, binding joist, or other timber which supports a floor beam, so as to receive the end of the floor beam.

Anagrams

  • Agin, Agni, Angi, Gina, NGIA, Nagi, Ngai, a- -ing, ag’in, agin, gina, inga

Basque

Noun

gain

  1. summit

French

Etymology

From Middle French gain, from Old French gaaing, from the verb gaaignier (to earn, gain, seize, conquer by force), from Frankish *waidanjan (to graze, forage, hunt), from Proto-Germanic *waiþō (a hunt, pasture, food), from Proto-Indo-European *weyh₁- (to seek, crave, hunt). Cognate with Old High German weidanōn (to hunt, chase), German Weide (pasture, pasturage). Compare also related Old French gain (harvest time, revival), from Frankish *waida (income, food, fodder) (whence French regain), from the same Germanic source.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡɛ̃/

Noun

gain m (plural gains)

  1. (usually in the plural) winnings, earnings, takings
  2. (finance) gain, yield

Derived terms

  • gain de cause
  • gain du temps

Further reading

  • “gain” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Louisiana Creole French

Etymology

From French gagner (to gain), compare Haitian Creole gen.

Verb

gain

  1. to have

Middle English

Etymology 1

From Old Norse gegn.

Adjective

gain

  1. Alternative form of gayn (direct, fast, good, helpful)

Etymology 2

From Old Norse gagn.

Noun

gain

  1. Alternative form of gayn (gain, reward, advantage)

Etymology 3

From Old Norse gegna.

Verb

gain

  1. Alternative form of gaynen

Etymology 4

From Old English ġeġn, gæġn, from Proto-Germanic *gagin; also influenced by Old Norse gegn, from the same Proto-Germanic form. Doublet of gayn (direct, fast, good, helpful).

Alternative forms

  • gayn, gein, ȝæn, ȝein, ȝean, gayne, gen, gan, gaine, geyn

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡɛi̯n/, /ɡeːn/, /jɛi̯n/, /jeːn/

Preposition

gain

  1. against, next to, touching
  2. (figuratively) against, opposed to, counter to, opposing (usually used in religious and spiritual contexts)
  3. towards, to, nearing
  4. (rare) on, on top of
  5. (rare) facing, pointed towards
Descendants
  • English: gain (obsolete)
  • Scots: gain, gin
References
  • “yẹ̄n, prep.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-04-23.

Adverb

gain

  1. back (to), returning (to)
References
  • “yẹ̄n, adv.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-04-23.

Middle French

Etymology

Old French gaaing.

Noun

gain m (plural gains)

  1. income (financial)

Descendants

  • French: gain

References

  • gain on Dictionnaire du Moyen Français (1330–1500) (in French)

Welsh

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡai̯n/

Adjective

gain

  1. Soft mutation of cain.

Mutation


English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /wɪn/
  • Rhymes: -ɪn
  • Homophones: wynn, Nguyen, winne

Etymology 1

From Middle English winnen, from Old English winnan (to labour, swink, toil, trouble oneself; resist, oppose, contradict; fight, strive, struggle, rage; endure) (compare Old English ġewinnan (conquer, obtain, gain; endure, bear, suffer; be ill)), from Proto-Germanic *winnaną (to swink, labour, win, gain, fight), from Proto-Indo-European *wenh₁- (to strive, wish, desire, love). Cognate with Low German winnen, Dutch winnen, German gewinnen, Norwegian Bokmål vinne, Norwegian Nynorsk and Swedish vinna.

Verb

win (third-person singular simple present wins, present participle winning, simple past and past participle won or (obsolete) wan)

  1. (obsolete, transitive) To conquer, defeat.
    • 1485, Sir Thomas Malory, Le Morte Darthur, Book IV:
      For and we doo bataille we two wyl fyghte with one knyȝt at ones / and therfore yf ye wille fyghte soo we wille be redy at what houre ye wille assigne / And yf ye wynne vs in bataille the lady shal haue her landes ageyne / ye say wel sayd sir Vwayne / therfor make yow redy so that ye be here to morne in the defence of the ladyes ryght
  2. (transitive, intransitive) To reach some destination or object, despite difficulty or toil (now usually intransitive, with preposition or locative adverb).
    • c. 17th century, unknown author, The Baron of Brackley (traditional folk song)
      I well may gang out, love, but I’ll never win home.
  3. (transitive) To triumph or achieve victory in (a game, a war, etc.).
  4. (transitive) To gain (a prize) by succeeding in competition or contest.
  5. (transitive) To obtain (someone) by wooing; to make an ally or friend of (frequently with over).
    • 1589, Sir Philip Sidney, The Countess of Pembroke’s Arcadia
      Thy virtue won me; with virtue preserve me.
    • 1591, William Shakespeare, Henry VI, Part 1, Act V, Scene 3
      She is a woman; therefore to be won.
  6. (intransitive) To achieve victory.
  7. (intransitive) To have power, coercion or control.
  8. (transitive) To obtain (something desired).
  9. (transitive) To cause a victory for someone.
  10. (transitive, mining) To extract (ore, coal, etc.).
Conjugation
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English winn, winne, from Old English winn (toil, labor, trouble, hardship; profit, gain; conflict, strife, war), from Proto-Germanic *winną (labour, struggle, fight), from Proto-Indo-European *wenh₁- (to strive, desire, wish, love). Cognate with German Gewinn (profit, gain), Dutch gewin (profit, gain).

Noun

win (plural wins)

  1. An individual victory.
    Antonym: loss
    Our first win of the season put us in high spirits.
  2. (slang) A feat carried out successfully; a victorious achievement.
    Antonym: fail
  3. (obsolete) Gain; profit; income.
  4. (obsolete) Wealth; goods owned.
Translations
Derived terms

Etymology 3

From Middle English wynne, winne, wunne, from Old English wynn (joy, rapture, pleasure, delight, gladness), from Proto-West Germanic *wunnju, from Proto-Germanic *wunjō (joy, delight, pleasure, lust), from Proto-Indo-European *wenh₁- (to strive, wish, desire, love).

Cognate with German Wonne (bliss, joy, delight), archaic Dutch wonne (joy), Danish ynde (grace), Icelandic yndi (delight).

Noun

win

  1. (Scotland) Pleasure; joy; delight.
Derived terms
  • worldly win

Etymology 4

From wind.

Verb

win

  1. (transitive, Scotland) To dry by exposure to the wind.

References


Chuukese

Etymology

Borrowed from English win.

Noun

win

  1. win
  2. victory
  3. prize

Verb

win

  1. to win

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -ɪn
  • IPA(key): /ʋɪn/

Verb

win

  1. first-person singular present indicative of winnen
  2. imperative of winnen

Kis

Noun

win

  1. woman

Further reading

  • Malcolm Ross, Proto Oceanic and the Austronesian Languages of Western Melanesia, Pacific Linguistics, series C-98 (1988)
  • Stephen Adolphe Wurm, New Guinea Area Languages and Language Study (1976)

Middle English

Etymology 1

Noun

win (uncountable)

  1. Alternative form of wynne (happiness)

Etymology 2

From Old English winn, from Proto-West Germanic *winnan, from Proto-Germanic *winną, *winnaną; akin to winnen. Reinforced by earlier iwin, from Old English ġewinn.

Alternative forms

  • winn, winne, wynne, wunne

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /win/

Noun

win (uncountable)

  1. benefit, gain, profit
  2. (Late Middle English) wealth, riches
  3. (Early Middle English) discord, conflict, turmoil
  4. (Early Middle English, rare) exertion, work
Descendants
  • English: win
References
  • “win, n.(1).”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 3 April 2020.

Etymology 3

Verb

win

  1. Alternative form of winnen (to win)

Etymology 4

Noun

win

  1. Alternative form of vine (grapevine)

North Frisian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /vɪn/

Etymology 1

From Old Frisian wind, from Proto-Germanic *windaz.

Noun

win m

  1. (Mooring) wind

Etymology 2

From Old Frisian wīn, from Proto-West Germanic *wīn, from Latin vīnum.

Noun

win m

  1. (Mooring) wine

Old Dutch

Etymology

From Proto-West Germanic *wīn, from Latin vīnum.

Noun

wīn m

  1. wine

Descendants

  • Middle Dutch: wijn
    • Dutch: wijn
      • Afrikaans: wyn
      • Berbice Creole Dutch: win
      • Negerhollands: wien, win
    • Limburgish: wien

Further reading

  • “wīn”, in Oudnederlands Woordenboek, 2012

Old English

Etymology

From Proto-West Germanic *wīn from Latin vīnum.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /wiːn/
  • Homophone: wynn

Noun

wīn n

  1. wine

Declension

Derived terms

  • æppelwīn
  • wīntrēow

Descendants

  • Middle English: wyn, win, wine, wyne, wijn, vine, vyn, vyne, wyen, weyn, wynne
    • English: wine (see there for further descendants)
    • Scots: wyne

Polish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /vʲin/

Noun

win f

  1. genitive plural of wina

Noun

win n

  1. genitive plural of wino

Tok Pisin

Etymology

From English wind.

Noun

win

  1. wind

Related terms

  • winim

Torres Strait Creole

Etymology

From English wind.

Noun

win

  1. wind

Derived terms

  • big win

Welsh

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /wiːn/

Noun

win

  1. Soft mutation of gwin.

Mutation

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