gaiter vs spat what difference

what is difference between gaiter and spat

English

Etymology

Borrowed from French guêtre, from Middle French guiestres, guestes pl, from Old French *gueste, from Frankish *wasta, *wastija, from Proto-Germanic *wastijō (garment; dress).

Cognate with Middle High German wester (a child’s chrisom-cloth), Middle High German westebarn (godchild), Old English wæstling (a coverlet), Gothic ???????????????????? (wasti, garment; dress).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈɡeɪ.tə/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈɡeɪ.təɹ/
  • Rhymes: -eɪtə(ɹ)

Noun

gaiter (plural gaiters)

  1. A covering of cloth or leather for the ankle and instep.
    Coordinate term: spats
  2. A covering cloth or leather for the whole leg from the knee to the instep, fitting down upon the shoe.
  3. Part of the ecclesiastical garb of a bishop.

Translations

See also

  • spat

Verb

gaiter (third-person singular simple present gaiters, present participle gaitering, simple past and past participle gaitered)

  1. To dress with gaiters.

Further reading

  • gaiters on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Anagrams

  • aigret, tirage, triage, trigae

Catalan

Etymology

gaita +‎ -er

Noun

gaiter m (plural gaiters, feminine gaitera)

  1. bagpiper

Further reading

  • “gaiter” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.

Old French

Verb

gaiter

  1. Alternative form of gaitier

Conjugation

This verb conjugates as a first-group verb ending in -er. The forms that would normally end in *-ts, *-tt are modified to z, t. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.



English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /spæt/
    • Rhymes: -æt

Etymology 1

Old English spittan, spætan.

Verb

spat

  1. simple past tense and past participle of spit

Etymology 2

Of uncertain origin; perhaps related to spit.

Noun

spat (uncountable)

  1. The spawn of shellfish, especially oysters and similar molluscs.
    • 2005, TVR Pillay & MN Kutty, Aquaculture: Principles and practices, p. 525:
      As spat-fall often occurs in areas away from environments suitable for oyster growing, the collection, transport and sale of oyster spat has developed into a separate industry.
  2. A juvenile shellfish which has attached to a hard surface.
Translations

Verb

spat (third-person singular simple present spats, present participle spatting, simple past and past participle spatted)

  1. (transitive, intransitive) To spawn. Used of shellfish as above.

Etymology 3

Shortening of spatterdash, from spatter + dash. 1779.

Noun

spat (plural spats)

  1. (often in the plural) A covering or decorative covering worn over a shoe.
    Coordinate term: gaiter
  2. (automotive, Britain, Australia) A piece of bodywork that covers the upper portions of the rear tyres of a car.
    Synonym: (US) fender skirt
  3. (aviation) A drag-reducing aerodynamic fairing covering the upper portions of the tyres of an aeroplane equipped with non-retractable landing gear.
Translations

Etymology 4

1804. American English, probably imitative.

Noun

spat (plural spats)

  1. A brief argument, falling out, quarrel.
Translations

Verb

spat (third-person singular simple present spats, present participle spatting, simple past and past participle spatted)

  1. To quarrel or argue briefly.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Smart to this entry?)
Translations

Further reading

  • Oxford English Dictionary, 1884–1928, and First Supplement, 1933.

Etymology 5

Attested from 1823.

Noun

spat (plural spats)

  1. A light blow with something flat.

Translations

Verb

spat (third-person singular simple present spats, present participle spatting, simple past and past participle spatted)

  1. (transitive and intransitive) To strike with a spattering sound.
    • 1922, B. M. Bower, The Trail of the White Mule, ch. 3:
      He felt the wind of a second bullet that spatted against a boulder near Barney.
    • 2007, Nolan Clay, “Co-workers testify about Kelsey’s mother,” Daily Oklahoman, 13 July, (retrieved 25 Aug. 2009):
      “She mentioned she had spatted Kelsey on her diaper with a hairbrush,” said Mildred Johnson, a co-worker.
  2. (US, dialect) To slap, as with the open hand; to clap together, as the hands.
    • 1845, Sylvester Judd, Margaret
      Little Isabel leaped up and down, spatting her hands.
Translations

Etymology 6

Latin spatium (space)

Noun

spat (plural spats)

  1. An obsolete unit of distance in astronomy (symbol S), equal to one billion kilometres.

Anagrams

  • APTS, APTs, ATSP, PATs, PSAT, PTAs, PTSA, Pats, TAPs, TPAs, Taps, ap’ts, apts, past, pats, stap, taps

Amis

Etymology

From Proto-Austronesian *Səpat.

Numeral

spat

  1. four

Danish

Etymology

From Middle Low German spat. Compare German Spat and Swedish spatt.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /spat/, [sb̥ad̥]

Noun

spat c (singular definite spatten, not used in plural form)

  1. spavin (disease of horses characterized by a bony swelling developed on the hock as the result of inflammation of the bones)
  2. få spat – get annoyed or angry

Derived terms

  • spattet

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /spɑt/
  • Hyphenation: spat
  • Rhymes: -ɑt

Etymology 1

From Middle Dutch spat.

Noun

spat m (plural spatten)

  1. (obsolete) blowgun
    Synonyms: blaaspijp, blaasroer

Etymology 2

From spatten.

Noun

spat m (plural spatten, diminutive spatje n)

  1. spot, speckle, stain
Derived terms
  • bloedspat
Descendants
  • Papiamentu: spat

Etymology 3

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

spat

  1. first-, second- and third-person singular present indicative of spatten
  2. imperative of spatten

Anagrams

  • past, stap, taps

Lower Sorbian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [spat]

Verb

spat

  1. supine of spaś

Serbo-Croatian

Verb

spat

  1. Short form of spavati: “Cili Trogir ide spat” = “Cijeli Trogir ide spati” = “The whole City of Trogir goes to sleep”

Taroko

Etymology

From Proto-Atayalic *səpat, from Proto-Austronesian *Səpat.

Numeral

spat

  1. four

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