gal vs gallon what difference

what is difference between gal and gallon

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡæl/
  • Rhymes: -æl

Etymology 1

From gallon.

Noun

gal (plural gal or gals)

  1. Abbreviation of gallon.

Etymology 2

Representing a nonstandard pronunciation of girl.

Noun

gal (plural gals)

  1. (colloquial) A young woman.
Usage notes

As with many colloquial terms relating to women (including, in some cases, “girl” itself), some may perceive the usage of this term to be derogatory. The word, however, is fairly neutral in and of itself.

Synonyms
  • See also Thesaurus:girl
Derived terms

Etymology 3

Shortened from galileo.

Noun

gal (plural gals, symbol Gal)

  1. A galileo (unit of acceleration).

See also

  • guy

Anagrams

  • AGL, ALG, Alg., GLA, LAG, LGA, lag

Afrikaans

Etymology

From Dutch gal. Cognate to English gall.

Noun

gal (uncountable)

  1. The bodily fluid bile

Bouyei

Etymology

From Proto-Tai *p.qaːᴬ (leg). Cognate with Thai ขา (kǎa), Northern Thai ᨡᩣ, Lao ຂາ (khā), ᦃᦱ (ẋaa), Shan ၶႃ (khǎa), Tai Nüa ᥑᥣᥴ (xáa), Ahom ???????? (khā), Zhuang ga.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ka˨˦/

Noun

gal

  1. (anatomy) leg; foot

Catalan

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central, Valencian) IPA(key): /ˈɡal/

Adjective

gal (feminine gal·la, masculine plural gals, feminine plural gal·les)

  1. Gaulish, Gallic (of or pertaining to Gaul)
    Synonym: gàl·lic

Noun

gal m (plural gals, feminine gal·la)

  1. Gaul (a person from Gaul)

Proper noun

gal m

  1. Gaulish (Celtic language that was spoken in Gaul)
    Synonym: gàl·lic

Related terms

Further reading

  • “gal” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.
  • “gal” in Gran Diccionari de la Llengua Catalana, Grup Enciclopèdia Catalana.
  • “gal” in Diccionari normatiu valencià, Acadèmia Valenciana de la Llengua.
  • “gal” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

Chinese

Etymology

Short for galgame, borrowed from Japanese ギャルゲーム (gyaru gēmu), which is wasei eigo (和製英語), from English gal + game.

Noun

gal

  1. (ACG, video games) galge (video or computer game centered around interactions with attractive anime-style girls)
    gal  ―  tuī gal  ―  to play galge

Danish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡaːˀl/, [ˈɡ̊æˀl]

Etymology 1

From Old Danish galæn, from Old Norse galinn (enchanted, mad), a past participle of gala (to sing, chant) (Danish gale (to crow)).

Adjective

gal (neuter galt, plural and definite singular attributive gale)

  1. crazy, mad, insane (mentally ill)
  2. mad, angry (showing temper)
  3. wrong (not the right one)
  4. bad

References

  • “gale,2” in Den Danske Ordbog

Etymology 2

From Old Norse gal (shouting), derived from the verb gala (to sing, chant) (Danish gale (to crow)).

Noun

gal n (singular definite galet, plural indefinite gal)

  1. crow (the sound of a cock)
Inflection

References

  • “gale,1” in Den Danske Ordbog

Etymology 3

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

gal

  1. imperative of gale

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɣɑl/
  • Hyphenation: gal
  • Rhymes: -ɑl

Etymology 1

From Middle Dutch galle, from Old Dutch galla, from Proto-Germanic *gallō.

Noun

gal f (uncountable)

  1. Bile, gall (yellow-green bodily fluid secreted by the liver).
  2. Bile, anger, wrath.
Derived terms
  • galblaas
  • galsteen
Descendants
  • Afrikaans: gal
  • Berbice Creole Dutch: gali
  • Negerhollands: gal
  • Papiamentu: hal, gal

Etymology 2

Ultimately from Latin galla. This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

Noun

gal f (plural gallen, diminutive galletje n)

  1. A gall (abnormal growth on a plant caused by foreign organisms).
Derived terms
  • galappel
  • galnoot
  • galwesp

Anagrams

  • alg, lag

Emilian

Etymology

From Latin gallus.

Noun

gal m

  1. cock

French

Pronunciation

Noun

gal m (plural gals)

  1. A unit of acceleration equal to one centimetre per second per second

Icelandic

Etymology

From gala (to crow).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kaːl/
  • Rhymes: -aːl

Noun

gal n (genitive singular gals, no plural)

  1. crowing (of a rooster)
  2. yelling

Declension


Irish

Etymology

From Old Irish gal, from Proto-Celtic *galā (ability) (compare Welsh gallu (be able)).

Pronunciation

  • (Munster) IPA(key): /ɡɑl̪ˠ/
  • (Connacht, Ulster) IPA(key): /ɡal̪ˠ/

Noun 1

gal f or m (genitive singular gaile, nominative plural gala)

  1. warlike ardor
  2. valor, fury
  3. vapor, steam
  4. boiling heat
  5. puff, whiff (of smoke, hot air)
  6. fit, bout, turn
  7. demand

Declension

Derived terms

Noun 2

gal m (genitive singular gail, nominative plural gala)

  1. blusterer
    Synonyms: bliústar, bolscaire, galach

Declension

Mutation

References

  • “gal” in Foclóir Gaeilge–Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “1 gal”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language
  • Entries containing “gal” in English-Irish Dictionary, An Gúm, 1959, by Tomás de Bhaldraithe.
  • Entries containing “gal” in New English-Irish Dictionary by Foras na Gaeilge.

Lithuanian

Etymology

A shortening derived from “gali (it may) būti (be)“.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ɡaːl]

Conjunction

gál

  1. maybe, perhaps
    Synonym: galbūt

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • gol

Etymology

From Old English gāl (lust, luxury, wantonness, folly, levity)

Adjective

gal

  1. lascivious, lustful
    nawt ane euch fleschlich hondlunge, ah ᵹetten euch gal word … — Ancrene Wisse, c1230
    Sweche pinen he þolien schal þat her wes of his fles ful gal And wolde louien his fleses wil. — Eleven Pains of Hell, 1300
  2. overly fond of
    Gripes freteþ hoere mawen And hoere inward everuidel, Ne be þe þarof no so gal, Eft hoe werpeþ al in al. — Eleven Pains of Hell, 1300

Derived terms

References

  • Middle English Dictionary, gol

Nalca

Noun

gal

  1. tree

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology 1

From Old Norse galinn, from gala (sing bewitching songs, in actuality bewitched by magical singing)

Adjective

gal (neuter singular galt, definite singular and plural gale, comparative galere, indefinite superlative galest, definite superlative galeste)

  1. insane; crazy; out of one’s mind; mad
  2. incorrect; erroneous; wrong; illegal; morally reproachable
Derived terms
  • galehus
  • galskap
  • (insane; crazy): stormannsgal
  • (with a very strong interest in): bilgal, fartsgal, guttegal, jentegal, sexgal
  • (phrases): bære galt av sted, det er aldri så galt at det ikke er godt for noe, gå galt, riv ruskende gal, vill og gal

Etymology 2

Related to the verb gale.

Noun

gal n (definite singular galet, indefinite plural gal, definite plural gala or galene)

  1. crow ((instance of) rooster’s crowing)
Derived terms
  • hanegal
Related terms
  • nattergal

Etymology 3

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

gal

  1. imperative of gale

References

  • “gal” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Anagrams

  • lag, gla

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology 1

From gala (to howl).

Noun

gal n (definite singular galet, indefinite plural gal, definite plural gala)

  1. a crow, howl, scream
Related terms
  • galing f

Etymology 2

Abbreviation.

Proper noun

gal (upper case Gal)

  1. Abbreviation of galatarbrevet.

Etymology 3

Possibly from English. An abbreviation.

Symbol

gal

  1. symbol used to represent a gallon

Etymology 4

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

gal

  1. imperative of gala

References

  • “gal” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Anagrams

  • Gal, gla, lag

Occitan

Etymology

From Latin gallus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ɡal]

Noun

gal m (plural gals)

  1. A cock, rooster

Related terms


Old English

Etymology

From Proto-West Germanic *gail.

Cognate with Old Saxon gēl, Dutch geil (salacious, lustful), Old High German geil (German geil (lustful)), Old Norse geiligr (beautiful). The Indo-European root may also be the source of Lithuanian gailùs (sharp, biting), Russian зело́ (zeló, very).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡɑːl/

Adjective

gāl (comparative gālra, superlative gālost)

  1. wanton, lustful; wicked

Declension

Descendants

  • Middle English: gal, gol
    • English: gole (dialectal)

Old French

Noun

gal m (oblique plural gaus or gax or gals, nominative singular gaus or gax or gals, nominative plural gal)

  1. A rock

Descendants

  • French: galet, galette
  • Norman: galet, galette, galiche, galot

References

  • Nouveau Petit Larousse illustré. Dictionnaire encyclopédique. Paris, Librairie Larousse, 1952, 146th edition

Polish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡal/

Etymology 1

From Latin.

Noun

gal m inan

  1. gallium
Declension

Etymology 2

Named in honour of Galileo Galilei

Noun

gal m inan

  1. A galileo
Declension

Etymology 3

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Noun

gal

  1. genitive plural of gala

Further reading

  • gal in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Rohingya

Alternative forms

  • ????????????????(gal)Hanifi Rohingya script

Noun

gal (Hanifi spelling ????????????????)

  1. mouth

Romagnol

Etymology

From Latin gallus.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡal/

Noun

gal m (plural ghël)

  1. rooster (male domestic fowl)
    • September 2012, Loris Pasini, E’ gal in la Ludla, il Papiro, page 15:
      E’ gal

      The rooster

Romanian

Etymology 1

Borrowed from Latin Gallus.

Noun

gal m (plural gali)

  1. a Gaul

Etymology 2

Borrowed from French gal.

Noun

gal m (plural gali)

  1. (physics) unit of measurement of acceleration, equal to 1 centimeter per second squared

See also

  • gâl

Scottish Gaelic

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kal̪ˠ/

Etymology 1

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Noun

gal m (genitive singular gail, plural gail)

  1. verbal noun of gail (cry, weep)
  2. (act of) crying, wailing
  3. wail

Etymology 2

From Old Irish gal (warlike ardour, fury, valour).

Noun

gal m (genitive singular gail, plural gail)

  1. burst of light/heat
  2. ardour
  3. valour
  4. fury
  5. vapour, steam

Mutation

References

  • “gal” in Edward Dwelly, Faclair Gàidhlig gu Beurla le Dealbhan/The Illustrated [Scottish] Gaelic–English Dictionary, 10th edition, Edinburgh: Birlinn Limited, 1911, →ISBN.
  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “1 gal”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language

Serbo-Croatian

Alternative forms

  • gȃo

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *galъ.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡâːl/
  • Hyphenation: gal

Adjective

gȃl (Cyrillic spelling га̑л)

  1. (dated) black, dark (physical attributes)
  2. (dated) dark fur

Synonyms

  • cȓn
  • mȑk

Derived terms

  • gàljan

Related terms

  • gȁlica

Somali

Verb

gal

  1. enter

Sumerian

Romanization

gal

  1. Romanization of ???? (gal)

Swedish

Verb

gal

  1. present tense of gala.
  2. imperative of gala.

Anagrams

  • alg, lag

Zou

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡal˧/

Noun

gal

  1. war

References

  • Lukram Himmat Singh (2013) A Descriptive Grammar of Zou, Canchipur: Manipur University, page 44


English

Etymology

From Middle English gallon, galoun, galun, from Old Northern French galun, galon (liquid measure) (compare Old French jalon), from Late Latin galum, galus (measure of wine), from Vulgar Latin *galla (vessel), possibly from Gaulish [Term?], ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *kel- (goblet). Cognate with Ancient Greek κύλιξ (kúlix, cup), Sanskrit कलश (kalaśa, jar, pitcher; measure of liquid). Related to Old French gille (wine measure) (from Medieval Latin gillō (earthenware jar)), Old French jale (bowl), Old French jaloie (measure of capacity).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡælən/
  • Rhymes: -ælən
  • Hyphenation: gal‧lon

Noun

gallon (plural gallons)

  1. A unit of volume, equivalent to eight pints
  2. (Britain, Canada) exactly 4.54609 liters; an imperial gallon
  3. (US) 231 cubic inches or approximately 3.785 liters for liquids (a “U.S. liquid gallon“)
  4. (US) one-eighth of a U.S. bushel or approximately 4.405 liters for dry goods (a “U.S. dry gallon“).
  5. (in the plural, informal) A large quantity (of any liquid).
    The pipe burst and gallons of water flooded into the kitchen.

Translations

Descendants

  • Cebuano: galon
  • Czech: galon
  • Serbo-Croatian: galon
  • Turkish: galon

Further reading

  • gallon on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Anagrams

  • Loglan

French

Noun

gallon m (plural gallons)

  1. gallon

Norman

Etymology

From Old Northern French galon, from Late Latin galum, galus (measure of wine), from Vulgar Latin *galla (vessel), possibly from Gaulish [Term?], ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *kel- (goblet).

Noun

gallon m (plural gallons)

  1. (Jersey) gallon

Tatar

Noun

gallon

  1. gallon (a unit of volume)

References

[1]

Declension


Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial