gallant vs proud what difference

what is difference between gallant and proud

English

Alternative forms

  • gallaunt (obsolete)

Etymology 1

From Middle English galant, galaunt, from Old French galant (courteous; dashing; brave), present participle of galer (to rejoice; make merry), from gale (pomp; show; festivity; mirth); either from Frankish *wala- (good, well), from Proto-Germanic *wal-, from Proto-Indo-European *welh₁- (to choose, wish); or alternatively from Frankish *gail (merry; mirthful; proud; luxuriant), from Proto-Germanic *gailaz (merry; excited; luxurious), related to Dutch geil (horny; lascivious; salacious; lecherous), German geil (randy; horny; lecherous; wicked), Old English gāl (wanton; wicked; bad).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡælənt/
  • Rhymes: -ælənt

Adjective

gallant (comparative more gallant, superlative most gallant)

  1. Brave, valiant.
  2. honorable.
  3. grand, noble.
  4. (obsolete) Showy; splendid; magnificent; gay; well-dressed.
    • This town [is built in a very gallant place.
Related terms
  • gallantly
  • gallantry
Translations

Etymology 2

From French

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ɡəˈlænt/, /ˈɡælənt/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ɡəˈlɑnt/, /ˈɡælənt/
  • Rhymes: -ænt

Adjective

gallant (comparative more gallant, superlative most gallant)

  1. Polite and attentive to ladies; courteous to women; chivalrous.
Translations

Noun

gallant (plural gallants)

  1. (dated) A fashionable young man who is polite and attentive to women.
    • 1610, The Tempest, by Shakespeare, act 1 scene 2
      PROSPERO: [] this gallant which thou see’st / Was in the wrack; and but he’s something stain’d / with grief,—that beauty’s canker,—thou mightst call him / A goodly person []
  2. One who woos, a lover, a suitor, a seducer.
    • 1749, Henry Fielding, The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling
      [] they were discovered in a very improper manner by the husband of the gypsy, who, from jealousy it seems, had kept a watchful eye over his wife, and had dogged her to the place, where he found her in the arms of her gallant.
    • 1819, John Keats, Otho the Great, Act III, Scene II, verses 140–143
      The ignominy of that whisper’d tale / About a midnight gallant, seen to climb / A window to her chamber neighbour’d near, / I will from her turn off, []
  3. (nautical) topgallant
Translations

Verb

gallant (third-person singular simple present gallants, present participle gallanting, simple past and past participle gallanted)

  1. (obsolete, transitive) To attend or wait on (a lady).
    • During this period, we were the lions of the neighbourhood; and, no doubt, strangers from the distant villages were taken to see the “Karhowrees” (white men), in the same way that countrymen, in a city, are gallanted to the Zoological Gardens.
  2. (obsolete, transitive) To handle with grace or in a modish manner.

References

  • gallant in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.

Welsh

Alternative forms

  • gallan (colloquial)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡaɬant/

Verb

gallant

  1. (literary) third-person plural present/future of gallu

Mutation


English

Alternative forms

  • prowd (obsolete)

Etymology

From Middle English proud, prout, prut, from Old English prūd, prūt (proud, arrogant, haughty) (compare Old English prȳtung (pride); prȳde, prȳte (pride)). Cognate with German Low German praud, Old Norse prúðr (gallant, brave, magnificent, stately, handsome, fine) (Icelandic prúður, Middle Swedish prudh, Danish prud), probably from Old French prod, prud (brave, gallant) (modern French preux), from Late Latin prōde (useful), derived from Latin prōdesse (to be of value); however, the Old English umlaut derivatives prȳte, prȳtian, etc. suggest the word may be older and possibly native. See also pride.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pɹaʊd/
  • Rhymes: -aʊd

Adjective

proud (comparative prouder or more proud, superlative proudest or most proud)

  1. Feeling honoured (by something); feeling happy or satisfied about an event or fact; gratified.
    1. That makes one feel proud (of something one did)
  2. Possessed of a due sense of what one deserves or is worth.
  3. (chiefly biblical) Having too high an opinion of oneself; arrogant, supercilious.
  4. Generating a sense of pride; being a cause for pride.
  5. (Of things) standing upwards as in the manner of a proud person; stately or majestic.
  6. Standing out or raised; swollen.
  7. (obsolete) Brave, valiant; gallant.
  8. (obsolete) Excited by sexual desire; specifically of a female animal: in heat.

Synonyms

  • See also Thesaurus:arrogant

Antonyms

  • ashamed

Derived terms

Related terms

  • pride
  • prude

Translations

Anagrams

  • pour’d, pudor

Czech

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *prǭdъ.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈprou̯t]
  • Rhymes: -out

Noun

proud m

  1. current
  2. (electricity) current

Declension

Derived terms

  • proudění
  • proudící
  • proudit
  • po proudu
  • proti proudu
  • protiproud

Further reading

  • proud in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • proud in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

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