galvanize vs startle what difference

what is difference between galvanize and startle

English

Alternative forms

  • galvanise (British)

Etymology

From French galvaniser, from galvanisme, named after Italian physiologist Luigi Aloisio Galvani (1737–1798).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡælvənaɪ̯z/

Verb

galvanize (third-person singular simple present galvanizes, present participle galvanizing, simple past and past participle galvanized) (transitive)

  1. (chemistry) To coat with a thin layer of metal by electrochemical means.
    Synonyms: electroplate, (rare) zinc
  2. To coat with rust-resistant zinc.
  3. (figuratively) To shock or stimulate into sudden activity, as if by electric shock.
    Synonyms: animate, startle, urge
  4. (archaic) To electrify.
    • 1835, Thomas Babington Macaulay, History (essay in the Edinburgh Review)
      The agitations resembled the grinnings and writhings of a galvanized corpse, not the struggles of an athletic man.
  5. (historical, US) To switch sides between Union and Confederate in the American Civil War.

Derived terms

  • galvanization

Related terms

  • galvanic

Translations


Portuguese

Verb

galvanize

  1. first-person singular present subjunctive of galvanizar
  2. third-person singular present subjunctive of galvanizar
  3. first-person singular imperative of galvanizar
  4. third-person singular imperative of galvanizar


English

Etymology

From Middle English startlen, stertlen, stertyllen (to rush, stumble along), from Old English steartlian (to kick with the foot, struggle, stumble), equivalent to start +‎ -le. Cognate with Old Norse stirtla (to hobble, stagger), Icelandic stirtla (to straighten up, erect). Compare also Middle English stertil (hasty). More at start.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈstɑːt(ə)l/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈstɑɹt(ə)l/
  • Rhymes: -ɑː(ɹ)təl

Verb

startle (third-person singular simple present startles, present participle startling, simple past and past participle startled)

  1. (intransitive) To move suddenly, or be excited, on feeling alarm; to start.
    • Why shrinks the soul / Back on herself, and startles at destruction?
  2. (transitive) To excite by sudden alarm, surprise, or apprehension; to frighten suddenly and not seriously; to alarm; to surprise.
    • 1896, Joseph Conrad, “An Outcast of the Islands”
      Nothing could startle her, make her scold or make her cry. She did not complain, she did not rebel.
  3. (transitive, obsolete) To deter; to cause to deviate.
    • 1660, Edward Hyde, 1st Earl of Clarendon, The Life of Edward Earl of Clarendon, Lord High Chancellor of England
      it would blast all their hopes, and startle all other princes from joining

Synonyms

  • (to move suddenly): start
  • (to excite suddenly): alarm, frighten, scare, surprise
  • (deter): deter

Derived terms

  • startling

Translations

Noun

startle (plural startles)

  1. A sudden motion or shock caused by an unexpected alarm, surprise, or apprehension of danger.

Derived terms

  • startler
  • startlish

Translations

See also

  • skittish

Anagrams

  • Slatter, Stalter, Statler, rattles, slatter, starlet

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