gambit vs ploy what difference

what is difference between gambit and ploy

English

Alternative forms

  • gambett (obsolete)

Etymology

From Italian gambetto (gambit, trip), from Italian gamba (leg), from Late Latin gamba.

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈɡæmbɪt/

Noun

gambit (plural gambits)

  1. (chess) An opening in chess, in which a minor piece or a pawn is sacrificed to gain an advantage.
  2. Any ploy or stratagem.
  3. A remark intended to open a conversation.

Derived terms

  • countergambit
  • Evans Gambit
  • Kings’s Gambit
  • Queen’s Gambit
  • Queen’s Gambit Declined
  • Tennison Gambit
  • Stafford Gambit

Translations

Verb

gambit (third-person singular simple present gambits, present participle gambiting, simple past and past participle gambited)

  1. (chess, transitive) To sacrifice (a pawn or minor piece) to gain an advantage.

French

Pronunciation

Noun

gambit m (plural gambits)

  1. gambit

Romanian

Etymology

From French gambit.

Noun

gambit n (plural gambituri)

  1. gambit

Declension



English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /plɔɪ/
  • Rhymes: -ɔɪ

Etymology 1

Possibly from a shortened form of employ or deploy. Or from earlier ploye, from Middle English, borrowed from Middle French ployer (compare modern plier), from Latin plicāre.

Noun

ploy (countable and uncountable, plural ploys)

  1. A tactic, strategy, or scheme.
    • 1902, John Buchan, The Outgoing of the Tide
      ‘Bide here,’ he says, ‘and boil the wine till I return. This is a ploy of my own on which no man follows me.’ And there was that in his face, as he spoke, which chilled the wildest, and left them well content to keep to the good claret and the saft seat, and let the daft laird go his own ways.
  2. (Britain, Scotland, dialect) Sport; frolic.
  3. (obsolete) Employment.
Translations

Etymology 2

Probably abbreviated from deploy.

Verb

ploy (third-person singular simple present ploys, present participle ploying, simple past and past participle ployed)

  1. (military) To form a column from a line of troops on some designated subdivision.
    • 1881, Thomas Wilhelm, A Military Dictionary and Gazetteer
      Troops drawn up so as to show an extended front, with slight depth, are said to be deployed; when the depth is considerable and the front comparatively small, they are said to be in ployed formation.
Antonyms
  • deploy

References

ploy in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.

Anagrams

  • -poly, poly, poly-

Sranan Tongo

Verb

ploy

  1. To flex.
  2. To curve.

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