game vs lame what difference

what is difference between game and lame

English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: gām, IPA(key): /ɡeɪm/
  • Rhymes: -eɪm

Etymology 1

From Middle English game, gamen, gammen, from Old English gamen (sport, joy, mirth, pastime, game, amusement, pleasure), from Proto-West Germanic *gaman, from Proto-Germanic *gamaną (amusement, pleasure, game”, literally “participation, communion, people together), from *ga- (collective prefix) + *mann- (man); or alternatively from *ga- + a root from Proto-Indo-European *men- (to think, have in mind).

Cognate with Old Frisian game, gome (joy, amusement, entertainment), Middle High German gamen (joy, amusement, fun, pleasure), Swedish gamman (mirth, rejoicing, merriment), Icelandic gaman (fun). Related to gammon, gamble.

Noun

game (countable and uncountable, plural games)

  1. A playful or competitive activity.
    1. A playful activity that may be unstructured; an amusement or pastime.
      Synonyms: amusement, diversion, entertainment, festivity, frolic, fun, gaiety, gambol, lark, merriment, merrymaking, pastime, play, prank, recreation, sport, spree
      Antonyms: drudgery, work, toil
    2. (countable) An activity described by a set of rules, especially for the purpose of entertainment, often competitive or having an explicit goal.
      Synonyms: see Thesaurus:game
    3. (Britain, in the plural) A school subject during which sports are practised.
      • 1991, Stephen Fry, The Liar, p. 37:
        From time to time, track-suited boys ran past them, with all the deadly purpose and humourless concentration of those who enjoyed Games.
    4. (countable) A particular instance of playing a game.
      Synonym: match
    5. That which is gained, such as the stake in a game.
    6. The number of points necessary to win a game.
    7. (card games) In some games, a point awarded to the player whose cards add up to the largest sum.
    8. (countable) The equipment that enables such activity, particularly as packaged under a title.
    9. One’s manner, style, or performance in playing a game.
    10. (countable) Ellipsis of video game.
  2. (now rare) Lovemaking, flirtation.
  3. (slang) Prostitution. (Now chiefly in on the game.)
    • 1755, Tobias Smollett, translating Miguel de Cervantes, Don Quixote, Volume 1, I.2:
      [H]e put spurs to his horse, and just in the twilight reached the gate, where, at that time, there happened to be two ladies of the game [transl. mugeres moças], who being on their journey to Seville, with the carriers, had chanced to take up their night’s lodging in this place.
  4. (countable, informal, nearly always singular) A field of gainful activity, as an industry or profession.
    Synonym: line
  5. (countable, figuratively) Something that resembles a game with rules, despite not being designed.
  6. (countable, military) An exercise simulating warfare, whether computerized or involving human participants.
    Synonym: wargame
  7. (uncountable) Wild animals hunted for food.
  8. (uncountable, informal, used mostly of males) The ability to seduce someone, usually by strategy.
  9. (uncountable, slang) Mastery; the ability to excel at something.
  10. (countable) A questionable or unethical practice in pursuit of a goal.
    Synonyms: scheme, racket
Derived terms
Descendants
  • Dutch: gamen, game
  • Japanese: ゲーム
  • Norman: gamme
  • Norwegian: gamen, game
  • Portuguese: game
  • Spanish: game
  • Welsh: gêm
Translations

Adjective

game (comparative gamer, superlative gamest)

  1. (colloquial) Willing to participate.
    Synonyms: sporting, willing, daring, disposed, favorable, nervy, courageous, valiant
    Antonyms: cautious, disinclined
  2. (of an animal) That shows a tendency to continue to fight against another animal, despite being wounded, often severely.
  3. Persistent, especially in senses similar to the above.
Translations

Verb

game (third-person singular simple present games, present participle gaming, simple past and past participle gamed)

  1. (intransitive) To gamble.
  2. (intransitive) To play card games, board games, or video games.
  3. (transitive) To exploit loopholes in a system or bureaucracy in a way which defeats or nullifies the spirit of the rules in effect, usually to obtain a result which otherwise would be unobtainable.
  4. (transitive, seduction community, slang, of males) To perform premeditated seduction strategy.
Derived terms
  • game the system
  • gamer
Translations

Etymology 2

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Adjective

game (comparative more game, superlative most game)

  1. Injured, lame (of a limb).
    • around 1900, O. Henry, Lost on Dress Parade
      You come with me and we’ll have a cozy dinner and a pleasant talk together, and by that time your game ankle will carry you home very nicely, I am sure.”

See also

  • game on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Anagrams

  • MEGA, Mega, mage, mega, mega-

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡeːm/
  • Hyphenation: game
  • Rhymes: -eːm

Etymology 1

Borrowed from English game.

Noun

game m (plural games, diminutive gamepje n)

  1. A video game, an electronic game.
    Synonyms: videogame, videospel
Hyponyms
  • computerspel
Related terms
  • gamen
  • gamer

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

game

  1. first-person singular present indicative of gamen
  2. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of gamen
  3. imperative of gamen

Middle English

Etymology 1

From Old English gamen, gomen, from Proto-West Germanic *gaman, from Proto-Germanic *gamaną, of disputed origin.

Alternative forms

  • gamen, gemen, gomen, gome, gammen, gaume, gamme, gamin, gomin, gomyn, gomun, gam, geme

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡaːm(ə)/, /ˈɡam(ə)/, /ˈɡaːmən/, /ˈɡamən/
  • (from OE gomen) IPA(key): /ˈɡɔːm(ə)/, /ˈɡɔːmən/
  • (Kent) IPA(key): /ˈɡɛːm(ə)/, /ˈɡɛːmən/

Noun

game (plural games or game)

  1. Entertainment or an instance of it; that which is enjoyable:
    1. A sport or other outdoor or physical activity.
    2. A game; a codified (and often competitive) form of entertainment.
    3. Sexual or romantic entertainment or activity (including intercourse in itself).
    4. An amusing, joking, or humorous activity or event.
  2. Any kind of event or occurrence; something that happens:
    1. An endeavour; a set of actions towards a goal.
    2. Any kind of activity having competition or rivalry.
  3. The state of being happy or joyful.
  4. Game; wild animals hunted for food.
  5. (rare) One’s quarry; that which one is trying to catch.
  6. (rare) Gamesmanship; gaming behaviour.
  7. (rare) The reward for winning a game.
Derived terms
  • gameful
  • gamely
  • gamen
Descendants
  • English: game, gammon (dialectal gam) (see there for further descendants)
  • Scots: gemme, gem, gyem
  • Yola: gaame, gaaume
References
  • “gāme, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2019-07-09.

Etymology 2

From Old English gæmnian, gamnian, gamenian.

Verb

game

  1. Alternative form of gamen

Portuguese

Etymology 1

Borrowed from English game.

Pronunciation

  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ˈɡejm/, /ˈɡej.mi/

Noun

game m (plural games)

  1. (Brazil, slang) electronic game (game played on an electronic device, such as a computer game, a video game or the like)
Quotations

For quotations using this term, see Citations:game.

See also
  • jogo

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Pronunciation

  • Hyphenation: ga‧me
  • Rhymes: -ɐmɨ, -ɐ̃mi

Verb

game

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of gamar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of gamar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of gamar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of gamar

Spanish

Noun

game m (plural games)

  1. (tennis) game


English

Pronunciation

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /leɪm/
  • Rhymes: -eɪm
  • Hyphenation: lame

Etymology 1

From Middle English lame, from Old English lama (lame), from Proto-Germanic *lamaz (lame), from Proto-Indo-European *lem- (to crush; fragile). Akin to German lahm and Dutch lam, Old Norse lami, Swedish, Danish and Norwegian lam, akin to Old Church Slavonic ломити (lomiti, to break).

Adjective

lame (comparative lamer, superlative lamest)

  1. Unable to walk properly because of a problem with one’s feet or legs.
  2. Moving with pain or difficulty on account of injury, defect or temporary obstruction of a function.
  3. (by extension) Hobbling; limping; inefficient; imperfect.
    • a. 1677, Isaac Barrow, Of Industry in General (sermon)
      a lame endeavour
    • c. 1603, William Shakespeare, Othello, Act II scene i[1]:
      O, most lame and impotent conclusion! []
  4. (slang) Unconvincing or unbelievable.
  5. (slang) Failing to be cool, funny, interesting or relevant.
Usage notes

Referring to a person without a disability as “lame” is offensive to many as it suggests a derogatory characterization of the physical condition from which the term was derived.

Synonyms
  • (unable to walk properly because of a problem with one’s feet or legs): crippled
  • (moving with difficulty):
  • (by extension, hobbling): hobbling, limping, inefficient, imperfect
  • (slang, unconvincing): weak, unbelievable
  • (slang, failing to be cool, funny, interesting, or relevant): boring, pathetic, uncool, unfunny, uninteresting, irrelevant
Antonyms
  • (unable to walk properly because of a problem with one’s feet or legs):
  • (moving with difficulty):
  • (by extension, hobbling): efficient, perfect
  • (slang, unconvincing): convincing, believable
  • (slang, failing to be cool, funny, interesting, or relevant): cool, funny, interesting, relevant
Derived terms
Translations

Verb

lame (third-person singular simple present lames, present participle laming, simple past and past participle lamed)

  1. (transitive) To cause (a person or animal) to become lame.
Translations

Noun

lame (plural lames)

  1. (prison slang) A stupid or undesirable person.
    • 2011, Lil’ Kim, Black Friday (song)
      You lames tryna clone my style and run wit it.

Etymology 2

From Middle French lame, from Latin lamina.

Noun

lame (plural lames)

  1. A lamina; a thin layer or plate of material, as in certain kinds of armor.
    • 2013, Paul F Walker, History of Armour 1100-1700, Crowood (→ISBN):
      This rim involved a raised rolled edge on the rerebrace that was inserted into a raised lip on the lower lame of the pauldron. This lip allows the arm to rotate without the need for leather straps and can be clearly seen carved on to the effigy []
    • 2015, Anne Curry, Malcolm Mercer, The Battle of Agincourt, Yale University Press (→ISBN), page 120:
      These pauldrons are generally asymmetrical with the left pauldron wider than the right, which is cut away for the passage of the lance. It would be attached to the shoulder by points through a restored leather tab on the top lame at the apex []
  2. (in the plural) A set of joined overlapping metal plates.
  3. Kitchen tool for scoring bread dough before baking.
Related terms
  • lamé
  • lamella, lamellar

References

Anagrams

  • -meal, Elam, Elma, Leam, Lema, Malé, alme, amel, leam, lema, male, meal, mela, mela-

Esperanto

Adverb

lame

  1. lamely

Estonian

Etymology

From lamama +‎ -e.

Adjective

lame (genitive lameda, partitive lamedat)

  1. flat

Declension


French

Etymology

Inherited from Latin lāmina, through the accusative lāminam. Doublet of lamine, a borrowing.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /lam/
  • Rhymes: -am
  • Homophone: lames

Noun

lame f (plural lames)

  1. lamina
  2. blade
  3. wave

Related terms

  • lamé m
  • lamer
  • lamellaire
  • lamelle
  • laminer
  • lamineur m

Descendants

  • Italian: lama
  • Persian: لام(lâm, microscope slide)

Further reading

  • “lame” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • mâle, mêla

Friulian

Etymology

Ultimately from Latin lamina. Compare Romansch loma, lama, French lame, Italian and Venetian lama.

Noun

lame f (plural lamis)

  1. blade

German

Etymology

From the English adjective lame.

Adjective

lame

  1. (slang) boring; unimpressive
  2. (slang) unskilled; useless

Declension

This entry needs an inflection-table template.

Further reading

  • “lame” in Duden online

Italian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈla.me/

Noun

lame f

  1. plural of lama

Anagrams

  • alme, male, mela

Mauritian Creole

Etymology

From French main.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [lame]

Noun

lame

  1. hand

Middle English

Verb

lame

  1. To shine.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Piers Plowman to this entry?)

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology 1

Adjective

lame

  1. (non-standard since 2012) definite singular of lam
  2. (non-standard since 2012) plural of lam

Etymology 2

Noun

lame m (definite singular lameen, indefinite plural lamear, definite plural lameane)

  1. alternative spelling of lamé

Old French

Noun

lame f (oblique plural lames, nominative singular lame, nominative plural lames)

  1. blade (of a weapon)

Romanian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈlame]

Noun

lame f

  1. indefinite plural of lamă
  2. indefinite genitive/dative singular of lamă

Spanish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈlame/, [ˈla.me]

Verb

lame

  1. Informal second-person singular () affirmative imperative form of lamer.
    ¡Lame mi culo! — “Lick my asshole!”
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present indicative form of lamer.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present indicative form of lamer.
    Lame. — “[He/she/it] licks.”

Swedish

Adjective

lame

  1. absolute definite natural masculine singular of lam.

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