game vs punt what difference

what is difference between game and punt

English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: gām, IPA(key): /ɡeɪm/
  • Rhymes: -eɪm

Etymology 1

From Middle English game, gamen, gammen, from Old English gamen (sport, joy, mirth, pastime, game, amusement, pleasure), from Proto-West Germanic *gaman, from Proto-Germanic *gamaną (amusement, pleasure, game”, literally “participation, communion, people together), from *ga- (collective prefix) + *mann- (man); or alternatively from *ga- + a root from Proto-Indo-European *men- (to think, have in mind).

Cognate with Old Frisian game, gome (joy, amusement, entertainment), Middle High German gamen (joy, amusement, fun, pleasure), Swedish gamman (mirth, rejoicing, merriment), Icelandic gaman (fun). Related to gammon, gamble.

Noun

game (countable and uncountable, plural games)

  1. A playful or competitive activity.
    1. A playful activity that may be unstructured; an amusement or pastime.
      Synonyms: amusement, diversion, entertainment, festivity, frolic, fun, gaiety, gambol, lark, merriment, merrymaking, pastime, play, prank, recreation, sport, spree
      Antonyms: drudgery, work, toil
    2. (countable) An activity described by a set of rules, especially for the purpose of entertainment, often competitive or having an explicit goal.
      Synonyms: see Thesaurus:game
    3. (Britain, in the plural) A school subject during which sports are practised.
      • 1991, Stephen Fry, The Liar, p. 37:
        From time to time, track-suited boys ran past them, with all the deadly purpose and humourless concentration of those who enjoyed Games.
    4. (countable) A particular instance of playing a game.
      Synonym: match
    5. That which is gained, such as the stake in a game.
    6. The number of points necessary to win a game.
    7. (card games) In some games, a point awarded to the player whose cards add up to the largest sum.
    8. (countable) The equipment that enables such activity, particularly as packaged under a title.
    9. One’s manner, style, or performance in playing a game.
    10. (countable) Ellipsis of video game.
  2. (now rare) Lovemaking, flirtation.
  3. (slang) Prostitution. (Now chiefly in on the game.)
    • 1755, Tobias Smollett, translating Miguel de Cervantes, Don Quixote, Volume 1, I.2:
      [H]e put spurs to his horse, and just in the twilight reached the gate, where, at that time, there happened to be two ladies of the game [transl. mugeres moças], who being on their journey to Seville, with the carriers, had chanced to take up their night’s lodging in this place.
  4. (countable, informal, nearly always singular) A field of gainful activity, as an industry or profession.
    Synonym: line
  5. (countable, figuratively) Something that resembles a game with rules, despite not being designed.
  6. (countable, military) An exercise simulating warfare, whether computerized or involving human participants.
    Synonym: wargame
  7. (uncountable) Wild animals hunted for food.
  8. (uncountable, informal, used mostly of males) The ability to seduce someone, usually by strategy.
  9. (uncountable, slang) Mastery; the ability to excel at something.
  10. (countable) A questionable or unethical practice in pursuit of a goal.
    Synonyms: scheme, racket
Derived terms
Descendants
  • Dutch: gamen, game
  • Japanese: ゲーム
  • Norman: gamme
  • Norwegian: gamen, game
  • Portuguese: game
  • Spanish: game
  • Welsh: gêm
Translations

Adjective

game (comparative gamer, superlative gamest)

  1. (colloquial) Willing to participate.
    Synonyms: sporting, willing, daring, disposed, favorable, nervy, courageous, valiant
    Antonyms: cautious, disinclined
  2. (of an animal) That shows a tendency to continue to fight against another animal, despite being wounded, often severely.
  3. Persistent, especially in senses similar to the above.
Translations

Verb

game (third-person singular simple present games, present participle gaming, simple past and past participle gamed)

  1. (intransitive) To gamble.
  2. (intransitive) To play card games, board games, or video games.
  3. (transitive) To exploit loopholes in a system or bureaucracy in a way which defeats or nullifies the spirit of the rules in effect, usually to obtain a result which otherwise would be unobtainable.
  4. (transitive, seduction community, slang, of males) To perform premeditated seduction strategy.
Derived terms
  • game the system
  • gamer
Translations

Etymology 2

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Adjective

game (comparative more game, superlative most game)

  1. Injured, lame (of a limb).
    • around 1900, O. Henry, Lost on Dress Parade
      You come with me and we’ll have a cozy dinner and a pleasant talk together, and by that time your game ankle will carry you home very nicely, I am sure.”

See also

  • game on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Anagrams

  • MEGA, Mega, mage, mega, mega-

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡeːm/
  • Hyphenation: game
  • Rhymes: -eːm

Etymology 1

Borrowed from English game.

Noun

game m (plural games, diminutive gamepje n)

  1. A video game, an electronic game.
    Synonyms: videogame, videospel
Hyponyms
  • computerspel
Related terms
  • gamen
  • gamer

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

game

  1. first-person singular present indicative of gamen
  2. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of gamen
  3. imperative of gamen

Middle English

Etymology 1

From Old English gamen, gomen, from Proto-West Germanic *gaman, from Proto-Germanic *gamaną, of disputed origin.

Alternative forms

  • gamen, gemen, gomen, gome, gammen, gaume, gamme, gamin, gomin, gomyn, gomun, gam, geme

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡaːm(ə)/, /ˈɡam(ə)/, /ˈɡaːmən/, /ˈɡamən/
  • (from OE gomen) IPA(key): /ˈɡɔːm(ə)/, /ˈɡɔːmən/
  • (Kent) IPA(key): /ˈɡɛːm(ə)/, /ˈɡɛːmən/

Noun

game (plural games or game)

  1. Entertainment or an instance of it; that which is enjoyable:
    1. A sport or other outdoor or physical activity.
    2. A game; a codified (and often competitive) form of entertainment.
    3. Sexual or romantic entertainment or activity (including intercourse in itself).
    4. An amusing, joking, or humorous activity or event.
  2. Any kind of event or occurrence; something that happens:
    1. An endeavour; a set of actions towards a goal.
    2. Any kind of activity having competition or rivalry.
  3. The state of being happy or joyful.
  4. Game; wild animals hunted for food.
  5. (rare) One’s quarry; that which one is trying to catch.
  6. (rare) Gamesmanship; gaming behaviour.
  7. (rare) The reward for winning a game.
Derived terms
  • gameful
  • gamely
  • gamen
Descendants
  • English: game, gammon (dialectal gam) (see there for further descendants)
  • Scots: gemme, gem, gyem
  • Yola: gaame, gaaume
References
  • “gāme, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2019-07-09.

Etymology 2

From Old English gæmnian, gamnian, gamenian.

Verb

game

  1. Alternative form of gamen

Portuguese

Etymology 1

Borrowed from English game.

Pronunciation

  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ˈɡejm/, /ˈɡej.mi/

Noun

game m (plural games)

  1. (Brazil, slang) electronic game (game played on an electronic device, such as a computer game, a video game or the like)
Quotations

For quotations using this term, see Citations:game.

See also
  • jogo

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Pronunciation

  • Hyphenation: ga‧me
  • Rhymes: -ɐmɨ, -ɐ̃mi

Verb

game

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of gamar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of gamar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of gamar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of gamar

Spanish

Noun

game m (plural games)

  1. (tennis) game


English

Etymology 1

From Old English [Term?], from Latin pontō (Gaulish flat-bottomed boat, pontoon), from pons (bridge); readopted from Middle Low German punte (ferry boat) or Middle Dutch ponte (ferry boat) of the same origin.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pʌnt/
  • Rhymes: -ʌnt

Noun

punt (plural punts)

  1. (nautical) A pontoon; a narrow shallow boat propelled by a pole.
Translations

Verb

punt (third-person singular simple present punts, present participle punting, simple past and past participle punted)

  1. (nautical) To propel a punt or similar craft by means of a pole.
Translations

Etymology 2

Possibly a dialectal variant of bunt. Rugby is the origin of the sports usage of the term.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pʌnt/
  • Rhymes: -ʌnt

Verb

punt (third-person singular simple present punts, present participle punting, simple past and past participle punted)

  1. To dropkick; to kick something a considerable distance.
    • 1975, Barry Targan, Harry Belten and the Mendelssohn Violin Concerto, page 133:
      At the dump he emptied the station wagon quickly and only once punted a bag of refuse, exploding it like a pinata at a Mexican Christmas.
    • 2019, Maurice Carlos Ruffin, We Cast a Shadow (One World, →ISBN), page 100:
      He even hated pets—I once saw him punt a cat.
    1. (rugby, American football, Australian Rules football, Gaelic football, soccer, transitive, intransitive) To kick a ball dropped from the hands before it hits the ground. (This puts the ball farther from the goal across which the opposing team is attempting to score, so improves the chances of the team punting.)
    2. (soccer) To kick a bouncing ball far and high.
  2. (colloquial, intransitive) To equivocate and delay or put off (answering a question, addressing an issue, etc).
    • 2014, John Prados, The Family Jewels: The CIA, Secrecy, and Presidential Power, University of Texas Press (→ISBN), page 91:
      The briefer reported it had been terminated on orders from Secretary Schlesinger, but attributed this to a sense Shamrock produced little, not to the fact it had been discovered. The NSA briefer punted on whether Fort Meade had been reading Americans’ private messages, …
  3. To retreat from one’s objective; to abandon an effort one still notionally supports.
  4. (colloquial, intransitive) To make the best choice from a set of non-ideal alternatives.
  5. (colloquial, transitive) To eject; to kick out of a place.
    • 2001, Roger A. Grimes, Malicious Mobile Code: Virus Protection for Windows (page 236)
      The user is punted from the channel, and must rejoin to gain access.
Derived terms
Translations

Noun

punt (plural punts)

  1. (rugby, American football, soccer) A kick made by a player who drops the ball and kicks it before it hits the ground.
See also
  • drop kick
Translations

Etymology 3

Borrowed from French pointe or Spanish punto (point). Doublet of point.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pʌnt/
  • Rhymes: -ʌnt

Noun

punt (plural punts)

  1. A point in the game of faro.
  2. The act of playing at basset, baccara, faro, etc.
  3. A bet or wager.
  4. (Australia) Gambling, as a pastime, especially betting on horseraces or the dogs. E.g anyone up for a punt on Randwick?(Can we add an example for this sense?)
  5. A highly speculative investment or other commitment.
  6. A wild guess.
  7. An indentation in the base of a wine bottle.
  8. (glassblowing) A thin glass rod which is temporarily attached to a larger piece in order to better manipulate the larger piece.
Translations

Verb

punt (third-person singular simple present punts, present participle punting, simple past and past participle punted)

  1. To play at basset, baccara, faro, etc.
  2. (Australia, Ireland, New Zealand, Britain) To stake against the bank, to back a horse, to gamble or take a chance more generally
    • She heard [] of his punting at gaming tables.
  3. (figuratively) To make a highly speculative investment or other commitment, or take a wild guess.
Translations

Related terms

  • punter

Etymology 4

Borrowed from Irish punt, from Middle English pund.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pʊnt/
  • Rhymes: -ʊnt

Noun

punt (plural punts)

  1. The Irish pound, used as the unit of currency of Ireland until it was replaced by the euro in 2002.

Further reading

  • Punt on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Punt in the Encyclopædia Britannica (11th edition, 1911)

Catalan

Etymology

From Latin punctum.

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Valencian) IPA(key): /ˈpunt/
  • (Central) IPA(key): /ˈpun/

Noun

punt m (plural punts)

  1. point (specific location)
  2. (grammar) dot, point (punctuation mark)
  3. (mathematics) point (used for separating the fractional part from the whole part)
  4. dot (used in Morse code)

Derived terms

Related terms

  • puntuar
  • punyir
  • punxar

Further reading

  • “punt” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pʏnt/
  • Hyphenation: punt
  • Rhymes: -ʏnt

Etymology 1

Borrowed from Latin punctum.

Noun

punt n (plural punten, diminutive puntje n)

  1. point
    1. A position, place, or spot
    2. A moment in time
    3. A central idea, argument, or opinion of a discussion or presentation
    4. A tally of worth or score (such as in a game)
    5. A mark, note, or grade (as in for a class)
    6. (geometry) geometric point
Derived terms

Etymology 2

From French point, from Latin punctus.

Noun

punt m (plural punten, diminutive puntje n)

  1. The terminal point of something
  2. dot
  3. full stop, period
  4. A pointy slice of a cake, pie or pizza.
    Synonym: taartpunt
Derived terms

Irish

Etymology 1

From Middle Irish punt, from Middle English pund (pound), from Old English pund (a pound, weight), from Proto-Germanic *pundą (pound, weight), from pondus (weight), from Proto-Indo-European *pend-, *spend- (to pull, stretch).

Alternative forms

  • punnt (obsolete)
  • púnt (Munster)

Pronunciation

  • (Munster) IPA(key): /pˠuːn̪ˠt̪ˠ/ (also spelled púnt)
  • (Connacht, Ulster) IPA(key): /pˠʊn̪ˠt̪ˠ/

Noun

punt m (genitive singular puint, nominative plural puint or punta)

  1. pound (unit of weight, unit of currency)
Declension
  • Alternative plural: punta (Cois Fharraige)
Derived terms

Etymology 2

From English pound.

Noun

punt m (genitive singular puint, nominative plural puint)

  1. (of enclosure) pound
Declension

Etymology 3

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

punt m (genitive singular puint, nominative plural puint)

  1. butt(-end)
  2. tip (of finger)
Declension
Derived terms

Etymology 4

Noun

punt

  1. Alternative form of puinn

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pˠʊnˠt̪ˠ/

Mutation

Further reading

  • “punt” in Foclóir Gaeilge–Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “punt”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language
  • Entries containing “punt” in English-Irish Dictionary, An Gúm, 1959, by Tomás de Bhaldraithe.
  • Entries containing “punt” in New English-Irish Dictionary by Foras na Gaeilge.
  • “punt” in the National Terminology Database for Irish, Fiontar & Scoil na Gaeilge, DCU and Foras na Gaeilge.

Manx

Etymology

From Middle Irish punt, from Middle English pund (pound).

Noun

punt m (genitive singular punt, plural puint)

  1. (numismatics, unit of measure) pound

Derived terms

Mutation

References

  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “punt”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language

Old French

Noun

punt m (oblique plural punz or puntz, nominative singular punz or puntz, nominative plural punt)

  1. Alternative form of pont

Romansch

Alternative forms

  • (Sutsilvan) pùnt

Etymology

From Latin pōns, pōntem (compare Catalan pont, French pont, Italian ponte, Occitan pònt, Portuguese ponte, Spanish puente), from Proto-Indo-European *pont- (path, road).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [punt]

Noun

punt m (plural punts)

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Surmiran, Puter, Vallader) bridge

Slovene

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /púnt/

Noun

pȕnt m inan

  1. revolt

Inflection


Welsh

Etymology

Borrowed from Old English pund.

Pronunciation

  • (North Wales) IPA(key): /pɨ̞nt/
  • (South Wales) IPA(key): /pɪnt/

Noun

punt f (plural punnoedd or punnau)

  1. (numismatics) pound (sterling)
  2. pound (weight)
    Synonym: pwys

Mutation

References

  • R. J. Thomas, G. A. Bevan, P. J. Donovan, A. Hawke et al., editors (1950–present), “punt”, in Geiriadur Prifysgol Cymru Online (in Welsh), University of Wales Centre for Advanced Welsh & Celtic Studies

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