gang vs ring what difference

what is difference between gang and ring

English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: găng, IPA(key): /ɡæŋ/
  • Rhymes: -æŋ

Etymology 1

From Middle English gangen, from Old English gangan (to go, walk, turn out), from Proto-Germanic *ganganą (to go, walk), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰengʰ- (to step, walk). Cognate with Scots gang (to go on foot, walk), Swedish gånga (to walk, go), Faroese ganga (to walk), Icelandic ganga (to walk, go), Vedic Sanskrit जंहस् (jáṃhas). Ultimately: related to etym. 2, see below.

Alternative forms

  • gan

Verb

gang (third-person singular simple present gangs, present participle ganging, simple past and past participle ganged)

  1. (intransitive, chiefly Britain dialectal, Northern England, Scotland) To go; walk; proceed.
    • 1772, Richard Cumberland, The Fashionable Lover. A Comedy. Act III
      (Colin alone) Ah, Colin, thou’rt a prodigal; a thriftless loon thou’st been, that cou’d na’ keep a little pelf to thysall when thou had’st got it; now thou may’st gang in this poor geer to thy live’s end, and worse too for aught I can tell; ’faith, mon, ’twas a smeart little bysack of money thou hadst scrap’d together, an the best part of it had na’ being last amongst thy kinsfolk, in the Isles of Skey and Mull; muckle gude may it do the weams of them that ha’ it! There was Jamie MacGregor and Sawney MacNab, and the twa braw lads of Kinruddin, with old Charley MacDougall, my mother’s first husband’s second cousin: by my sol I cou’d na’ see such near relations, and gentlemen of sich auncient families gang upon bare feet, while I rode a horseback: I had been na’ true Scot, an I cou’d na’ ge’en a countryman a gude last upon occasion (as he is going out, Miss Aubrey enters.)
    • 1828, James Hogg, Mary Burnet
      “And am I to meet my Mary at Moffat? Come away, little, dear, welcome body, thou blessed of heaven, come away, and taste of an auld shepherd’s best cheer, and I’ll gang foot for foot with you to Moffat, and my auld wife shall gang foot for foot with us too. I tell you, little, blessed, and welcome crile, come along with me.”
Derived terms

Etymology 2

From Middle English gang, from Old English gang (a journey; way; passage), from Proto-Germanic *gangaz, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰongʰ-o-s, from *ǵʰengʰ- (to step; stride). Cognate with Saterland Frisian Gong, Dutch gang, German Gang, Norwegian gang, Swedish gång, Icelandic gangur, Vedic Sanskrit जंहस् (jáṃhas).

Noun

gang (plural gangs)

  1. A number going in company; a number of friends or persons associated for a particular purpose.
    the Gashouse Gang
    The gang from our office is going out for drinks Friday night.
  2. A group of laborers under one foreman; a squad.
    a gang of sailors; a railroad gang; a labor gang or pool.
  3. A criminal group with a common cultural background and identifying features, often associated with a particular section of a city.
    a youth gang; a neighborhood gang; motorcycle gang.
  4. A group of criminals or alleged criminals who band together for mutual protection and profit.
    The Winter Hill Gang was quite proficient at murdering rival mobsters in order to take over their rackets.
  5. A group of politicians united in furtherance of a political goal.
    The Gang of Four was led by Jiang Qing, the fourth wife of Mao Zedong.
    Not all members of the Gang of Six are consistent in their opposition to filibuster.
  6. (US) A chain gang.
  7. A combination of similar tools or implements arranged so as, by acting together, to save time or labor; a set.
    a gang of saws; a gang of plows; a gang drill; gang milling.
  8. A set; all required for an outfit.
    a new gang of stays.
  9. (electrics) A number of switches or other electrical devices wired into one unit and covered by one faceplate.
    an outlet gang box; a double gang switch.
  10. (electrics) A group of wires attached as a bundle.
    a gang of wires
    Do a drop for the telephone gang, then another drop for the Internet gang, both through the ceiling of the wiring closet.
  11. (now chiefly dialectal) A going, journey; a course, path, track.
    • 1840, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Woodnotes I.3:
      In unploughed Maine he sought the lumberers’ gang / Where from a hundred lakes young rivers sprang
    • 1869, Papa André, Once a Week, page 418/1:
      That week was also called the Gang Week, from the Saxon ganger, to go; and the Rogation days were termed the Gang Days.
    • 1895, Frederick Tupper Jr., Anglo-Saxon Dæg-Mæl, Modern Language Association of America, page 229:
      Neither Marshall nor Bouterwek makes clear the connection existing between the Gang-days and the Major and Minor Litanies.
  12. (obsolete) An outhouse: an outbuilding used as a lavatory.
    • c. 1000, Aelfric, Homilies, Vol. I, page 290:
      Þaða he to gange com.
Synonyms
  • (outhouse): See Thesaurus:bathroom
Derived terms
Translations
Descendants
  • Portuguese: gangue
  • Thai: แก๊ง (gɛ́ng)

Verb

gang (third-person singular simple present gangs, present participle ganging, simple past and past participle ganged)

  1. (transitive) To attach similar items together to form a larger unit.
    • 1981, United States. Department of Defense, Human Engineering Design Criteria for Military Systems (page 58)
      Volume controls may be ganged to mode switches to provide maximum output []
Derived terms
  • gang up
  • gang up on

See also

  • Appendix:English collective nouns

Etymology 3

See gan.

Verb

gang (second-person singular simple present gangst)

  1. Pronunciation spelling of gan.

Etymology 4

Shortening of gangbang.

Verb

gang (third-person singular simple present gangs, present participle ganging, simple past and past participle ganged)

  1. Synonym of gangbang: to have sex with a single partner as a gang.
    • 2015, Richard Allen, Skinhead, page 80:
      [] there’s a thin line to tread to avoid fights or getting “ganged” when rejecting the sexual overtures of incarcerated women.

References

  • The New Partridge Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English.

Etymology 5

Noun

gang (countable and uncountable, plural gangs)

  1. (mining) Alternative form of gangue

Anagrams

  • gnag

Afrikaans

Etymology

From Dutch gang, from Middle Dutch ganc, from Old Dutch gank, gang, from Proto-Germanic *gangaz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /χaŋ/

Noun

gang (plural gange)

  1. a passageway, alley

Alemannic German

Verb

gang

  1. second-person imperative singular of gaa

Balinese

Etymology

From Dutch gang (passageway, alley).

Noun

gang

  1. alleyway, alley, narrow street. A narrow pathway bound by walls on both sides

Cebuano

Pronunciation

  • Hyphenation: gang

Etymology 1

From English gang.

Noun

gang

  1. a gang; a criminal group with a common cultural background and identifying features, often associated with a particular section of a city

Etymology 2

From langga, pangga. Compare lang.

Noun

gang

  1. a term of address for a beloved person; dear; sweetie

Quotations

For quotations using this term, see Citations:gang.


Danish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡ̊anɡ̊/, [ɡ̊ɑŋˀ]
  • Rhymes: -ɑŋˀ

Etymology 1

From Old Danish gang, from Old Norse gangr, from Proto-Germanic *gangaz, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰengʰ- (stride, step).

Noun

gang c (singular definite gangen, plural indefinite gange)

  1. the act of walking, a walk
  2. a time (an occurrence, an incidence)
    Hvor mange gange slog klokken?

    How many times did the bell toll?
  3. a way or path to walk on, either outdoors or indoors (a corridor)
Inflection

Derived terms

Etymology 2

See gange.

Verb

gang

  1. imperative of gange

References

  • “gang” in Den Danske Ordbog
  • “gang” in Ordbog over det danske Sprog

Dutch

Etymology

From Middle Dutch ganc, from Old Dutch gank, gang, from Proto-Germanic *gangaz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɣɑŋ/
  • Hyphenation: gang
  • Rhymes: -ɑŋ

Noun

gang m (plural gangen, diminutive gangetje n)

  1. passageway, alley
  2. gait, walk (person’s manner of walking or stepping)
  3. journey
  4. hallway, corridor
  5. course

Derived terms

Descendants

  • Afrikaans: gang
  • Petjo: gang
  • Indonesian: gang
  • Papiamentu: gang, han, hangetsji, hangetsje

French

Etymology

Borrowed from English gang.

Pronunciation

  • (France) IPA(key): /ɡɑ̃ɡ/
  • (Canadian French) IPA(key): /ɡaŋ/

Noun

gang m (plural gangs)

  1. gang, group of ill-doers

Derived terms

  • en gang

Further reading

  • “gang” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Garo

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

gang

  1. river

References

  • Burling, R. (2003) The Language of the Modhupur Mandi (Garo) Vol. II: The Lexicon[1], Bangladesh: University of Michigan, page 114

German

Verb

gang

  1. obsolete form of geh, second-person imperative singular of gehen

Hungarian

Etymology

From German Gang.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈɡɒŋɡ]
  • Rhymes: -ɒŋɡ

Noun

gang (plural gangok)

  1. (informal) hanging corridor (along the main walls of the courtyard of a tenement building, a major venue of socializing with neighbours)
    Synonym: (mainly as an architectural term) függőfolyosó

Declension

Derived terms

  • gangos
  • körgang

Further reading

  • gang in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN

Indonesian

Etymology 1

From Dutch gang (passageway, alley), from Middle Dutch ganc, from Old Dutch gank, gang, from Proto-Germanic *gangaz, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰongʰ-o-s, from *ǵʰengʰ- (to step; stride). Doublet of geng.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡaŋ/
  • Hyphenation: gang

Noun

gang (first-person possessive gangku, second-person possessive gangmu, third-person possessive gangnya)

  1. alleyway, alley, narrow street. A narrow pathway bound by walls on both sides
    Synonym: lorong

Descendants

  • Min Nan: (kàn, narrow street)

Etymology 2

Noun

gang (first-person possessive gangku, second-person possessive gangmu, third-person possessive gangnya)

  1. Alternative spelling of geng (gang)

Verb

gang

  1. Alternative spelling of geng

References

Further reading

  • “gang” in Kamus Besar Bahasa Indonesia (KBBI) Daring, Jakarta: Badan Pengembangan dan Pembinaan Bahasa, Kementerian Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan Republik Indonesia, 2016.

Italian

Alternative forms

  • ganga, ghenga, ghega (dated)

Etymology

Unadapted borrowing from English gang.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡɛnɡ/

Noun

gang f (invariable, dated plural gangs)

  1. gang, specifically:
  2. (dated) a group of people
  3. (dated) a group of laborers under one foreman
  4. a criminal group

Related terms

  • gangster

References

  • gang in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell’Enciclopedia Italiana

Mandarin

Pronunciation

Romanization

gang

  1. Nonstandard spelling of gāng.
  2. Nonstandard spelling of gǎng.
  3. Nonstandard spelling of gàng.

Usage notes

  • English transcriptions of Mandarin speech often fail to distinguish between the critical tonal differences employed in the Mandarin language, using words such as this one without the appropriate indication of tone.

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Old Norse gangr, also related to .

Noun

gang m (definite singular gangen, indefinite plural ganger, definite plural gangene)

  1. hall, hallway
    Sett fra deg skoene i gangen.

    Leave your shoes in the hallway.
  2. passage, corridor
    I enden av den lange gangen er klasserommet.

    The classroom is at the end of the long corridor.
  3. aisle
  4. walk, path
  5. walk, walking, going
  6. walk, gait
    Gangen hans er litt merkelig.

    His gait is a bit weird
  7. working, running, action, movement, motion, operation
  8. course; passage
  9. course; march
  10. time
    Vi vant fem ganger på rad!

    We won five times in a row!
  11. plot, action
    Historiens gang var litt komplisert.

    The plot of the story was somewhat complicated.
  12. (mining) dike, lode
  13. vein
  14. (anatomy) duct

Derived terms

References

  • “gang” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Old Norse gangr, also related to .

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡɑŋː/

Noun

gang m (definite singular gangen, indefinite plural gangar, definite plural gangane)

  1. hall, hallway
    Sett frå deg skorne i gangen.

    Leave your shoes in the hallway.
  2. passage, corridor
  3. aisle
  4. walk, path
  5. walk, walking, going
  6. walk, gait
    Gangen hans er litt merkeleg.

    His gait is a bit weird
  7. working, running, action, movement, motion, operation
  8. course; passage
  9. course; march
  10. plot, action
    Gangen i soga var litt komplisert.

    The plot of the story was somewhat complicated.
  11. (mining) dike, lode
  12. vein
  13. (anatomy) duct

Derived terms

See also

  • gong

References

  • “gang” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Old English

Alternative forms

  • geng, gong, gung

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *gangaz, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰengʰ- (to step; stride). Related to Old English gangan (to go, walk).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡɑnɡ/, [ɡɑŋɡ]

Noun

gang m

  1. going, walking
  2. path
  3. gait
  4. toilet

Declension

Derived terms

  • gangsetl
  • gangstōl
  • ingang
  • niþergang
  • ūpgang
  • ūtgang
  • ymbgang

Descendants

  • Middle English: gang, gong
    • Scots: gang
    • English: gang, gong, goung
      • Dutch: gang
      • Portuguese: gangue
      • Norman: dgaîngue

Derived terms


Old High German

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *gangaz.

Noun

gang m (plural ganga)

  1. A path, course, way, journey; a going

Declension

Derived terms

  • ubargang
  • Wolfgang

Descendants

  • Middle High German: ganc
    • German: Gang

Polish

Etymology

From English gang, from Middle English gang, from Old English gang, from Proto-Germanic *gangaz, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵʰongʰ-o-s, from *ǵʰengʰ-.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡank/

Noun

gang m inan

  1. gang (criminal group with a common background)

Declension

Related terms

  • (nouns) gangster, gangsterstwo, gangsteryzm
  • (adjective) gangsterski

Further reading

  • gang in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • gang in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese

Noun

gang m (Portugal) or f (Brazil) (plural gangs)

  1. Dated spelling of gangue.

Romanian

Etymology

From German Gang

Noun

gang n (plural ganguri)

  1. passageway

Declension


Scots

Alternative forms

  • gae
  • gan

Etymology

From Middle English gangen, from Old English gangan, Old Norse ganga, with inflected forms from Old English gān (like English go).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡɑŋ/

Verb

gang (third-person singular present gangs, present participle gaun, past gaed, past participle gaen)

  1. To go.
    • 1794, Robert Burns, “A Red, Red, Rose”:
      And I will love thee still, my dear
      Till a’ the seas gang dry.
    • 1902, John Buchan, The Outgoing of the Tide
      ‘There you gang,’ she cries, ‘broking wi’ thae wearifu’ Pharisees o’ Caulds, whae daurna darken your mither’s door! A bonnie dutiful child, quotha! Wumman, hae ye nae pride, or even the excuse o’ a tinkler-lass?’

Spanish

Etymology

From English gang.

Noun

gang m (plural gangs)

  1. gang

Vietnamese

Pronunciation

  • (Hà Nội) IPA(key): [ɣaːŋ˧˧]
  • (Huế) IPA(key): [ɣaːŋ˧˧]
  • (Hồ Chí Minh City) IPA(key): [ɣaːŋ˧˧]

Etymology 1

From Proto-Vietic *c-kaːŋ (handspan).

Noun

gang

  1. a handspan

See also

Etymology 2

From Proto-Vietic *t-kaːŋ, from Old Chinese (OC *C.kˤaŋ) (B-S) (SV: cương).

Noun

gang

  1. cast iron


English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: rĭng, IPA(key): /ɹɪŋ/
  • Rhymes: -ɪŋ
  • Homophone: wring

Etymology 1

From Middle English ring, from Old English hring (ring, circle), from Proto-Germanic *hringaz (ring), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)krengʰ-, extended nasalized form of *(s)ker- (to turn, bend). Cognate with West Frisian ring, Low German Ring, Dutch ring, German Ring, Swedish ring, also Finnish rengas. Doublet of rink.

Noun

ring (plural rings)

  1. (physical) A solid object in the shape of a circle.
    1. A circumscribing object, (roughly) circular and hollow, looking like an annual ring, earring, finger ring etc.
      Synonyms: annulus, hoop, torus
    2. A round piece of (precious) metal worn around the finger or through the ear, nose, etc.
    3. (Britain) A bird band, a round piece of metal put around a bird’s leg used for identification and studies of migration.
    4. (Britain) A burner on a kitchen stove.
    5. In a jack plug, the connector between the tip and the sleeve.
    6. (historical) An instrument, formerly used for taking the sun’s altitude, consisting of a brass ring suspended by a swivel, with a hole at one side through which a solar ray entering indicated the altitude on the graduated inner surface opposite.
    7. (botany) A flexible band partly or wholly encircling the spore cases of ferns.
  2. (physical) A group of objects arranged in a circle.
    1. A circular group of people or objects.
    2. (astronomy) A formation of various pieces of material orbiting around a planet or young star.
    3. (Britain) A large circular prehistoric stone construction such as Stonehenge.
  3. A piece of food in the shape of a ring.
  4. A place where some sports or exhibitions take place; notably a circular or comparable arena, such as a boxing ring or a circus ring; hence the field of a political contest.
    • 1707, Edmund Smith, Phaedra and Hippolitus
      Place me, O, place me in the dusty ring, / Where youthful charioteers contend for glory.
    1. The open space in front of a racecourse stand, used for betting purposes.
  5. An exclusive group of people, usually involving some unethical or illegal practices.
    • 1877, Edward Augustus Freeman, The History of the Norman Conquest of England
      the ruling ring at Constantinople
    • 1928, Upton Sinclair, Boston
      It’s a blackmail ring, and the district attorneys get a share of the loot.
  6. (chemistry) A group of atoms linked by bonds to form a closed chain in a molecule.
  7. (geometry) A planar geometrical figure included between two concentric circles.
  8. (typography) A diacritical mark in the shape of a hollow circle placed above or under the letter; a kroužek.
  9. (historical) An old English measure of corn equal to the coomb or half a quarter.
    • 1866, James Edwin Thorold Rogers, A History of Agriculture and Prices in England, Volume 1, page 168.
      The ring is common in the Huntingdonshire accounts of Ramsey Abbey. It was equal to half a quarter, i.e., is identical with the coomb of the eastern counties
  10. (computing theory) A hierarchical level of privilege in a computer system, usually at hardware level, used to protect data and functionality (also protection ring).
    • 2007, Steve Anson, Steve Bunting, Mastering Windows Network Forensics and Investigation (page 70)
      Kernel Mode processes run in ring 0, and User Mode processes run in ring 3.
  11. (firearms) Either of the pair of clamps used to hold a telescopic sight to a rifle.
  12. (cartomancy) The twenty-fifth Lenormand card.
Derived terms
Translations
Gallery

Verb

ring (third-person singular simple present rings, present participle ringing, simple past and past participle ringed)

  1. (transitive) To enclose or surround.
  2. (transitive, figuratively) To make an incision around; to girdle.
  3. (transitive) To attach a ring to, especially for identification.
    • 1919, Popular Science (volume 95, number 4, page 31)
      Ringing a pig of ordinary size is easy, but special arrangements must be made for handling the big ones.
  4. (transitive) To surround or fit with a ring, or as if with a ring.
  5. (falconry) To rise in the air spirally.
  6. (transitive) To steal and change the identity of (cars) in order to resell them.
    • A. Woodley, Trio: 3 short stories
      Gabe said that as Derry had only caught part of the conversation, it’s possible that they were discussing a film, it was bad enough that they’d unwittingly been brought into ringing cars, adding drugs into it was far more than either of them could ever be comfortable with.
    • 2019 (10 December), Ross McCarthy, Digbeth chop shop gang jailed over £2m stolen car racket (in Birmingham Live) [2]
      They used two bases in Digbeth to break down luxury motors, some of which were carjacked or stolen after keys were taken in house raids. The parts were then fitted to salvaged cars bought online. [] Jailing the quartet, a judge at Birmingham Crown Court said it was a “car ringing on a commercial and substantial scale”.
Derived terms
  • ringer
  • ring-fence, ringfence
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English ringen, from Old English hrinġan (to ring), from Proto-Germanic *hringijaną. Cognate with Dutch ringen, Swedish ringa.

Noun

ring (plural rings)

  1. The resonant sound of a bell, or a sound resembling it.
  2. (figuratively) A pleasant or correct sound.
  3. (figuratively) A sound or appearance that is characteristic of something.
  4. (colloquial) A telephone call.
  5. Any loud sound; the sound of numerous voices; a sound continued, repeated, or reverberated.
    • the ring of acclamations fresh in his ears
  6. A chime, or set of bells harmonically tuned.
    • as great and tunable a ring of bells as any in the world
Derived terms
  • give a ring
  • ringtone
  • ringback
Translations

Verb

ring (third-person singular simple present rings, present participle ringing, simple past rang or (nonstandard) rung, past participle rung)

  1. (intransitive) Of a bell, etc., to produce a resonant sound.
  2. (transitive) To make (a bell, etc.) produce a resonant sound.
  3. (transitive) To produce (a sound) by ringing.
    They rang a Christmas carol on their handbells.
  4. (intransitive, figuratively) To produce the sound of a bell or a similar sound.
  5. (intransitive, figuratively) Of something spoken or written, to appear to be, to seem, to sound.
  6. (transitive, colloquial, Britain, Australia, New Zealand) To telephone (someone).
  7. (intransitive) to resound, reverberate, echo.
    • 1898, J. Meade Falkner, Moonfleet Chapter 4
      So he spoke, and it seemed there was a little halting at first, as of men not liking to take Blackbeard’s name in Blackbeard’s place, or raise the Devil by mocking at him. But then some of the bolder shouted ‘Blackbeard’, and so the more timid chimed in, and in a minute there were a score of voices calling ‘Blackbeard, Blackbeard’, till the place rang again.
    • 1919, Boris Sidis, The Source and Aim of Human Progress:
      It is instructive for us to learn as well as to ponder on the fact that “the very men who looked down with delight, when the sand of the arena reddened with human blood, made the arena ring with applause when Terence in his famous line: ‘Homo sum, Nihil humani alienum puto’ proclaimed the brotherhood of man.”
  8. (intransitive) To produce music with bells.
    • 1669, William Holder, Elements of Speech
      Four Bells admit Twenty-four changes in Ringing
  9. (dated) To repeat often, loudly, or earnestly.
Derived terms
Translations

Etymology 3

From a shortening of German Zahlring (number(s) ring) (coined by German mathematician David Hilbert in 1892). Apparently first used in English in 1930, E. T. Bell, “Rings whose elements are ideals,” Bulletin of the American Mathematical Society.

Noun

ring (plural rings)

  1. (algebra) An algebraic structure which consists of a set with two binary operations: an additive operation and a multiplicative operation, such that the set is an abelian group under the additive operation, a monoid under the multiplicative operation, and such that the multiplicative operation is distributive with respect to the additive operation.
  2. (algebra) An algebraic structure as above, but only required to be a semigroup under the multiplicative operation, that is, there need not be a multiplicative identity element.
Hypernyms
  • pseudo-ring
  • semiring
Hyponyms
  • algebra over a field
  • commutative ring
    • integral domain
      • unique factorization domain, Noetherian domain
        • principal ideal domain
          • Euclidean domain
            • field
Meronyms
  • group of units
  • ideal
Derived terms
  • Boolean ring
  • polynomial ring
Translations

Etymology 4

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

ring (plural rings)

  1. (mathematical analysis, measure theory) A family of sets that is closed under finite unions and differences.
Hyponyms
  • algebra (of sets)
  • σ-ring
Translations

References

Anagrams

  • NGRI, girn, grin

Afrikaans

Etymology

From Dutch ring, from Middle Dutch rinc, from Old Dutch ring, from Proto-West Germanic *hring, from Proto-Germanic *hringaz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /rəŋ/

Noun

ring (plural ringe)

  1. ring, hollow circular object

Atong (India)

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.).

Noun

ring

  1. taro

References

  • van Breugel, Seino. 2015. Atong-English dictionary, second edition. Available online: https://www.academia.edu/487044/Atong_English_Dictionary.

Balinese

Preposition

ring

  1. in, at (basa alus)
    Synonym: di (basa biasa)

Cimbrian

Adjective

ring

  1. (of weight) light

References

  • Umberto Patuzzi, ed., (2013) Ünsarne Börtar, Luserna: Comitato unitario delle linguistiche storiche germaniche in Italia / Einheitskomitee der historischen deutschen Sprachinseln in Italien

Czech

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈrɪŋk/
  • Rhymes: -ɪŋk
  • Homophone: rynk

Noun

ring m inan

  1. ring (place where some sports take place; boxing ring and similar)

Declension

Further reading

  • ring in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • ring in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Danish

Etymology 1

From Old Norse hringr, from Proto-Germanic *hringaz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /renɡ/, [ʁæŋˀ]

Noun

ring c (singular definite ringen, plural indefinite ringe)

  1. ring
  2. circle
  3. halo
  4. hoop
  5. coil
Inflection
Derived terms
  • vielsesring

Etymology 2

Verbal noun to ringe (to ring).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /renɡ/, [ʁæŋˀ]

Noun

ring n (singular definite ringet, plural indefinite ring)

  1. (archaic) ring (the resonant sound of a bell, a telephone call)
Inflection

Etymology 3

See ringe.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /renɡ/, [ʁæŋˀ]

Verb

ring

  1. imperative of ringe

Dutch

Etymology

From Middle Dutch rinc, from Old Dutch ring, from Proto-West Germanic *hring, from Proto-Germanic *hringaz.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /rɪŋ/
  • Hyphenation: ring
  • Rhymes: -ɪŋ

Noun

ring m (plural ringen, diminutive ringetje n)

  1. ring, hollow circular object
  2. (gymnastics) ring
  3. beltway, ring road

Derived terms

Descendants

  • Afrikaans: ring
  • Negerhollands: rink, riṅ
  • Indonesian: ring
  • Papiamentu: renchi, ringtsje (from the diminutive)

See also

  • kring

Estonian

Etymology

From Middle Low German rink. Compare German Ring. See also rõngas.

Noun

ring (genitive ringi, partitive ringi)

  1. circle

Declension

See also

  • rõngas

French

Etymology

From English ring (sense 1) and Dutch ring (sense 2).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʁiŋɡ/

Noun

ring m (plural rings)

  1. (sports, chiefly combat sports) ring
  2. (Belgium) ring road, beltway

Derived terms

  • ring de boxe

Further reading

  • “ring” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Garo

Noun

ring

  1. boat

German

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ʁɪŋ]

Verb

ring

  1. singular imperative of ringen
  2. (colloquial) first-person singular present of ringen

Hungarian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈriŋɡ]
  • Hyphenation: ring
  • Rhymes: -iŋɡ

Etymology 1

From an onomatopoeic (sound-imitative) root + -g (frequentative suffix).

Verb

ring

  1. (intransitive) to swing, to rock
    Synonyms: billeg, inog, ingadozik, himbálózik, himbálódzik
  2. (intransitive, of a ship) to sway, to roll
    Synonyms: ringatózik, ringatódzik, dülöng, dülöngél, himbálódzik, himbálózik

Conjugation

or

Derived terms
  • ringat

Etymology 2

From English ring.

Noun

ring (plural ringek)

  1. (dated, boxing) ring, boxing ring (space in which a boxing match is contested)
    Synonym: szorító
Declension

References

Further reading

  • (to roll, sway, swing): ring in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN
  • (boxing ring): ring in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN
  • (in economy, cf. cartel): ring in Bárczi, Géza and László Országh. A magyar nyelv értelmező szótára (’The Explanatory Dictionary of the Hungarian Language’). Budapest: Akadémiai Kiadó, 1959–1962. Fifth ed., 1992: →ISBN

Indonesian

Etymology 1

Onomatopoeic.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈrɪŋ]
  • Hyphenation: ring

Noun

ring (first-person possessive ringku, second-person possessive ringmu, third-person possessive ringnya)

  1. (onomatopoeia) sound of bell.

Etymology 2

From Dutch ring, from Middle Dutch rinc, from Old Dutch ring, from Proto-Germanic *hringaz. Doublet of langsir.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈrɪŋ]
  • Hyphenation: ring

Noun

ring

  1. ring,
    1. a circumscribing object, (roughly) circular and hollow, looking like an annual ring, earring, finger ring etc.
      Synonyms: cincin, gelang
    2. boxing ring.
  2. (colloquial) circle
    Synonym: lingkaran

Further reading

  • “ring” in Kamus Besar Bahasa Indonesia (KBBI) Daring, Jakarta: Badan Pengembangan dan Pembinaan Bahasa, Kementerian Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan Republik Indonesia, 2016.

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology 1

From Old Norse hringr, from Proto-Germanic *hringaz.

Noun

ring m (definite singular ringen, indefinite plural ringer, definite plural ringene)

  1. ring; a circular piece of material
  2. The ring, place where sports such as boxing takes place
Derived terms

Etymology 2

Verb

ring

  1. imperative of ringe

References

  • “ring” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Old Norse hringr, from Proto-Germanic *hringaz.

Noun

ring m (definite singular ringen, indefinite plural ringar, definite plural ringane)

  1. ring; a circular piece of material
  2. The ring, place where sports such as boxing takes place

Derived terms

Verb

ring

  1. imperative of ringja, ringje, ringa and ringe

References

  • “ring” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Old Dutch

Etymology

From Proto-West Germanic *hring, from Proto-Germanic *hringaz.

Noun

ring m

  1. ring, circle

Descendants

  • Middle Dutch: rinc
    • Dutch: ring
      • Afrikaans: ring
      • Negerhollands: rink, riṅ
      • Indonesian: ring
      • Papiamentu: renchi, ringtsje (from the diminutive)
    • Limburgish: rink

Further reading

  • “rink”, in Oudnederlands Woordenboek, 2012

Old High German

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *hringaz.

Noun

ring m

  1. ring (object in the shape of a circle)

Descendants

  • Middle High German: rinc, ring
    • German: Ring
    • Luxembourgish: Rank
    • Yiddish: רינג(ring)

Polish

Etymology

From English ring, from Middle English ring, from Old English hring (ring, circle), from Proto-Germanic *hringaz (ring), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)krengʰ-, extended nasalized form of *(s)ker- (to turn, bend). Doublet of rynek (market, marketplace).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /rʲink/

Noun

ring m inan

  1. (boxing) boxing ring

Declension

Derived terms

  • (adjective) ringowy

Further reading

  • ring in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • ring in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese

Noun

ring m (plural rings)

  1. Alternative form of ringue

Serbo-Croatian

Etymology

From English ring.

Noun

rȉng m (Cyrillic spelling ри̏нг)

  1. the ring (place where some sports take place; boxing ring and similar)

Declension

This entry needs an inflection-table template.


Spanish

Etymology

From English ring. Doublet of rancho.

Noun

ring m (plural rings)

  1. (boxing) ring

Swedish

Pronunciation

Etymology 1

From Old Swedish ringer, from Old Norse hringr, from Proto-Germanic *hringaz.

Noun

ring c

  1. ring; a circular piece of material
  2. The ring, place where sports such as boxing takes place
  3. (mathematics) A ring, algebraic structure
  4. (mathematics) A ring, planar geometrical figure
  5. (astronomy) A ring, collection of material orbiting some planets
  6. Each of the (usually three) years in a Swedish gymnasium (highschool)
Declension
Derived terms
  • vigselring

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

ring

  1. imperative of ringa.

West Frisian

Etymology

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

Noun

ring c (plural ringen, diminutive rinkje)

  1. ring, circle
  2. ring (jewelry)

Derived terms

  • ringje
  • earring

Further reading

  • “ring”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011

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