gangrene vs mortification what difference

what is difference between gangrene and mortification

English

Etymology

From French gangrène, from Latin gangraena, from Ancient Greek γάγγραινα (gángraina, gangrene), from γράω (gráō, I gnaw).

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈɡaŋˌɡɹiːn/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈɡæŋˌɡɹin/
  • Hyphenation: gan‧grene

Noun

gangrene (countable and uncountable, plural gangrenes)

  1. The necrosis or rotting of flesh, usually caused by lack of blood supply.
    If gangrene sets in, we may have to amputate the foot.
  2. (figuratively) A damaging or corrupting influence.
    • 1960, Cora Vreede-de Stuers, The Indonesian woman: struggles and achievements
      Women should earn equal wages with men for equal work done. Child marriages and polygamy are a gangrene on society.

Derived terms

  • gas gangrene

Translations

Verb

gangrene (third-person singular simple present gangrenes, present participle gangrening, simple past and past participle gangrened)

  1. (transitive) To produce gangrene in.
  2. (intransitive) To be affected with gangrene.
  3. (transitive) To corrupt; To cause to become degenerate.

Anagrams

  • gangreen

Dutch

Noun

gangrene n (uncountable)

  1. (Belgium) Alternative form of gangreen.

Italian

Noun

gangrene f

  1. plural of gangrena

Anagrams

  • gnagnere

Spanish

Verb

gangrene

  1. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of gangrenar.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of gangrenar.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of gangrenar.
  4. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of gangrenar.


English

Etymology

From Middle French mortification, from Old French, from Latin mortificatio.

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -eɪʃən

Noun

mortification (countable and uncountable, plural mortifications)

  1. The act of mortifying.
  2. A sensation of extreme shame or embarrassment.
  3. (medicine) The death of part of the body.
    • 1913, D.H. Lawrence, Sons and Lovers, chapter 5
      And then there’s the fever and the mortification—if it took bad ways he’d quickly be gone.
  4. A bringing under of the passions and appetites by a severe or strict manner of living.
  5. (law, Scotland) A bequest to a charitable institution.

Synonyms

  • (a sensation of extreme shame): shame, humiliation

Antonyms

  • (a sensation of extreme shame): honor, exaltation

Translations


French

Noun

mortification f (plural mortifications)

  1. mortification

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