gap vs opening what difference

what is difference between gap and opening

English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: gap, IPA(key): /ɡæp/
  • Rhymes: -æp

Etymology 1

From Middle English gap, gappe, a borrowing from Old Norse gap (an empty space, gap, chasm), related to Danish gab (an expanse, space, gap), Old English ġeap (open space, expanse), Old Norse gapa (to gape); compare gape.

Noun

gap (plural gaps)

  1. An opening in anything made by breaking or parting.
  2. An opening allowing passage or entrance.
  3. An opening that implies a breach or defect.
  4. A vacant space or time.
  5. A hiatus, a pause in something which is otherwise continuous.
  6. A vacancy, deficit, absence, or lack.
    (see also gap-toothed)
  7. A mountain or hill pass.
  8. (Sussex) A sheltered area of coast between two cliffs (mostly restricted to place names).
  9. (baseball) The regions between the outfielders.
  10. (Australia, for a medical or pharmacy item) The shortfall between the amount the medical insurer will pay to the service provider and the scheduled fee for the item.
    • 2008, Eileen Willis, Louise Reynolds, Helen Keleher, Understanding the Australian Health Care System, page 5,
      Under bulk billing the patient does not pay a gap, and the medical practitioner receives 85% of the scheduled fee.
  11. (Australia) (usually written as “the gap”) The disparity between the indigenous and non-indigenous communities with regard to life expectancy, education, health, etc.
  12. (genetics) An unsequenced region in a sequence alignment.
Synonyms
  • (opening made by breaking or parting): break, hole, rip, split, tear, rift, chasm, fissure
  • (opening allowing passage or entrance): break, clearing, hole, opening; see also Thesaurus:hole
  • (opening that implies a breach or defect): space
  • (vacant space or time): break, space, window; see also Thesaurus:interspace or Thesaurus:interim
  • (hiatus): hiatus; see also Thesaurus:pause
  • (mountain pass): col, neck, pass
  • (in baseball):
Hyponyms
Derived terms
  • Gap-1
  • Gap-2
  • gapless
  • gap-toothed
  • mind the gap
  • Scots’ Gap
  • Watford Gap
Related terms
  • bridge the gap
  • gap of danger
  • gap it
  • gap year
  • stand in the gap
  • take the gap
Translations

Verb

gap (third-person singular simple present gaps, present participle gapping, simple past and past participle gapped)

  1. (transitive) To notch, as a sword or knife.
  2. (transitive) To make an opening in; to breach.
  3. (transitive) To check the size of a gap.
  4. (New Zealand, slang) To leave suddenly.
Translations

Etymology 2

Noun

gap (plural gaps)

  1. Alternative form of gup (elected head of a gewog in Bhutan)

Anagrams

  • AGP, APG, GPA, PAG, PGA, Pag

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -ɑp

Etymology 1

Verb

gap

  1. first-person singular present indicative of gappen
  2. imperative of gappen

Etymology 2

Borrowed from English gap. Related to gapen, gaap, jaap.

Noun

gap n (plural gappen, diminutive gapje n)

  1. (business) gap
    Synonyms: gat, kloof

French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡap/

Noun

gap m (plural gaps)

  1. (chemistry) gap
  2. gap (difference)

Garo

Noun

gap

  1. snail

Icelandic

Etymology

Back-formation from gapa (to open one’s mouth wide; to yawn).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kaːp/
  • Rhymes: -aːp

Noun

gap n (genitive singular gaps, nominative plural göp)

  1. gap, opening
    Synonyms: op, rifa, glufa

Declension


Indonesian

Etymology 1

Onomatopoeic.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡap/
  • Hyphenation: gap

Noun

gap

  1. beating, the sound of action by which someone or something is beaten.
    Synonym: degap

Etymology 2

From English gap, from Middle English gap, gappe, a borrowing from Old Norse gap (an empty space, gap, chasm).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡɛp/
  • Hyphenation: gap

Noun

gap

  1. gap,
    1. an opening in anything.
      Synonym: celah
    2. the disparity between communities with regard to life expectancy, education, health, etc.
      Synonym: kesenjangan

Further reading

  • “gap” in Kamus Besar Bahasa Indonesia (KBBI) Daring, Jakarta: Badan Pengembangan dan Pembinaan Bahasa, Kementerian Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan Republik Indonesia, 2016.

Norwegian Bokmål

Verb

gap

  1. imperative of gape

Old Norse

Etymology

Presumably from gapa (to gape).

Pronunciation

  • (12th century Icelandic) IPA(key): /ˈɡɑp/

Noun

gap n (genitive gaps, plural gǫp)

  1. gap, empty space
    • Vǫluspá, verse 3, lines 7-8, in 1860, T. Möbius, Edda Sæmundar hins fróða: mit einem Anhang zum Theil bisher ungedruckter Gedichte. Leipzig, page 1:
      [] gap var ginnunga, / en gras hvergi.
      [] gap was of void, / but grass nowhere.
  2. (figuratively) shouting, crying, gab
    • Haralds saga herdráða 64, in 1868, C. R. Unger, G. Vigfússon, Flateyjarbok. Udg. efter offentlig foranstaltning, Volume 3. Christiania, page 425:
      [] þar uar suo mikit hareyste og gap []
      [] there was so much noise and gab []

Declension

Derived terms

Related terms

Descendants

References

  • gap in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • gap in An Icelandic-English Dictionary, R. Cleasby and G. Vigfússon, Clarendon Press, 1874, at Internet Archive.
  • gap in A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, G. T. Zoëga, Clarendon Press, 1910, at Internet Archive.

Polish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡap/

Noun

gap m pers

  1. (usually in the plural, derogatory) gawker, gaper, mindless onlooker, rubbernecker
    Synonym: gapowicz

Usage notes

  • Because this word inflects as if it contained a terminal [pʲ], which no longer exists in Polish and cannot be represented in Polish orthography, the nominative singular form is in practice used only as a lemma in dictionaries. Most native speakers only recognize this word in its inflected forms.

Declension

Noun

gap f

  1. genitive plural of gapa

Verb

gap

  1. second-person singular imperative of gapić

Further reading

  • gap in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • gap in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Swedish

Etymology

From Old Norse gap

Noun

gap n

  1. chasm or abyss
  2. gap; an opening that implies a breach or defect.
  3. a mouth, especially when wide open
  4. the space between the jaws of a wrench

Declension

Related terms

Anagrams

  • Apg., p.g.a., pga


English

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈoʊ.pə.nɪŋ/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈəʊ.pə.nɪŋ/

Verb

opening

  1. present participle of open

Derived terms

  • eye-opening (adjective)

Noun

opening (plural openings)

  1. An act or instance of making or becoming open.
    The daily openings of the day lily bloom gives it its name.
    He remembered fondly the Christmas morning opening of presents.
  2. Something that is open.
    A salamander darted out of an opening in the rocks.
    He slipped through an opening in the crowd.
  3. An act or instance of beginning.
    There have been few factory and store openings in the US lately.
    Their opening of the concert with Brass in Pocket always fires up the crowd.
  4. Something that is a beginning.
    1. The first performance of a show or play by a particular troupe.
      They were disappointed at the turnout for their opening, but hoped that word would spread.
    2. The initial period a show at an art gallery or museum is first opened, especially the first evening.
    3. The first few measures of a musical composition.
    4. (chess) The first few moves in a game of chess.
      John spends two hours a day studying openings, and another two hours studying endgames.
  5. A vacant position, especially in an array.
    Are there likely to be any openings on the Supreme Court in the next four years?
    1. A time available in a schedule.
      If you’d like to make a booking with us, we have an opening at twelve o’clock.
      The only two-hour openings for the hockey rink are between 1AM and 5AM.
    2. An unoccupied employment position.
      We have an opening in our marketing department.
  6. An opportunity, as in a competitive activity.
  7. (mathematics) In mathematical morphology, the dilation of the erosion of a set.

Synonyms

  • (something that is open): hole, gap, crevice; see also Thesaurus:hole or Thesaurus:interspace
  • (available time): availability, slot
  • (unoccupied employment position): job opening

Coordinate terms

  • (opening of an art show): vernissage

Descendants

  • Japanese: オープニング (ōpuningu)

Translations

Adjective

opening (not comparable)

  1. Pertaining to the start or beginning of a series of events.
    The opening theme of Beethoven’s Fifth Symphony is, perhaps, the most recognizable in all of European art music.
    The opening act of the battle for Fort Sumter was the firing of a single 10-inch mortar round from Fort Johnson at 4:30 a.m. on April 12, 1861, by Lt. Henry S. Farley, who acted upon the command of Capt. George S. James, which round exploded over Fort Sumter as a signal to open the general bombardment from 43 guns and mortars at Fort Moultrie, Fort Johnson, the floating battery, and Cummings Point.
  2. (cricket) describing the first period of play, usually up to the fall of the first wicket; describing a batsman who opens the innings or a bowler who opens the attack

Derived terms

References

  • “opening”, in Lexico, Dictionary.com; Oxford University Press, 2019–present.
  • “opening” in the Collins English Dictionary
  • “opening” in the Cambridge English Dictionary, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Dutch

Etymology

From openen +‎ -ing.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈoːpənɪŋ/

Noun

opening f (plural openingen, diminutive openinkje n)

  1. opening, gap
  2. the act or process of being opened

Spanish

Noun

opening m (plural openings)

  1. opening sequence; title sequence

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