gap vs spread what difference

what is difference between gap and spread

English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: gap, IPA(key): /ɡæp/
  • Rhymes: -æp

Etymology 1

From Middle English gap, gappe, a borrowing from Old Norse gap (an empty space, gap, chasm), related to Danish gab (an expanse, space, gap), Old English ġeap (open space, expanse), Old Norse gapa (to gape); compare gape.

Noun

gap (plural gaps)

  1. An opening in anything made by breaking or parting.
  2. An opening allowing passage or entrance.
  3. An opening that implies a breach or defect.
  4. A vacant space or time.
  5. A hiatus, a pause in something which is otherwise continuous.
  6. A vacancy, deficit, absence, or lack.
    (see also gap-toothed)
  7. A mountain or hill pass.
  8. (Sussex) A sheltered area of coast between two cliffs (mostly restricted to place names).
  9. (baseball) The regions between the outfielders.
  10. (Australia, for a medical or pharmacy item) The shortfall between the amount the medical insurer will pay to the service provider and the scheduled fee for the item.
    • 2008, Eileen Willis, Louise Reynolds, Helen Keleher, Understanding the Australian Health Care System, page 5,
      Under bulk billing the patient does not pay a gap, and the medical practitioner receives 85% of the scheduled fee.
  11. (Australia) (usually written as “the gap”) The disparity between the indigenous and non-indigenous communities with regard to life expectancy, education, health, etc.
  12. (genetics) An unsequenced region in a sequence alignment.
Synonyms
  • (opening made by breaking or parting): break, hole, rip, split, tear, rift, chasm, fissure
  • (opening allowing passage or entrance): break, clearing, hole, opening; see also Thesaurus:hole
  • (opening that implies a breach or defect): space
  • (vacant space or time): break, space, window; see also Thesaurus:interspace or Thesaurus:interim
  • (hiatus): hiatus; see also Thesaurus:pause
  • (mountain pass): col, neck, pass
  • (in baseball):
Hyponyms
Derived terms
  • Gap-1
  • Gap-2
  • gapless
  • gap-toothed
  • mind the gap
  • Scots’ Gap
  • Watford Gap
Related terms
  • bridge the gap
  • gap of danger
  • gap it
  • gap year
  • stand in the gap
  • take the gap
Translations

Verb

gap (third-person singular simple present gaps, present participle gapping, simple past and past participle gapped)

  1. (transitive) To notch, as a sword or knife.
  2. (transitive) To make an opening in; to breach.
  3. (transitive) To check the size of a gap.
  4. (New Zealand, slang) To leave suddenly.
Translations

Etymology 2

Noun

gap (plural gaps)

  1. Alternative form of gup (elected head of a gewog in Bhutan)

Anagrams

  • AGP, APG, GPA, PAG, PGA, Pag

Dutch

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -ɑp

Etymology 1

Verb

gap

  1. first-person singular present indicative of gappen
  2. imperative of gappen

Etymology 2

Borrowed from English gap. Related to gapen, gaap, jaap.

Noun

gap n (plural gappen, diminutive gapje n)

  1. (business) gap
    Synonyms: gat, kloof

French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡap/

Noun

gap m (plural gaps)

  1. (chemistry) gap
  2. gap (difference)

Garo

Noun

gap

  1. snail

Icelandic

Etymology

Back-formation from gapa (to open one’s mouth wide; to yawn).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kaːp/
  • Rhymes: -aːp

Noun

gap n (genitive singular gaps, nominative plural göp)

  1. gap, opening
    Synonyms: op, rifa, glufa

Declension


Indonesian

Etymology 1

Onomatopoeic.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡap/
  • Hyphenation: gap

Noun

gap

  1. beating, the sound of action by which someone or something is beaten.
    Synonym: degap

Etymology 2

From English gap, from Middle English gap, gappe, a borrowing from Old Norse gap (an empty space, gap, chasm).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡɛp/
  • Hyphenation: gap

Noun

gap

  1. gap,
    1. an opening in anything.
      Synonym: celah
    2. the disparity between communities with regard to life expectancy, education, health, etc.
      Synonym: kesenjangan

Further reading

  • “gap” in Kamus Besar Bahasa Indonesia (KBBI) Daring, Jakarta: Badan Pengembangan dan Pembinaan Bahasa, Kementerian Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan Republik Indonesia, 2016.

Norwegian Bokmål

Verb

gap

  1. imperative of gape

Old Norse

Etymology

Presumably from gapa (to gape).

Pronunciation

  • (12th century Icelandic) IPA(key): /ˈɡɑp/

Noun

gap n (genitive gaps, plural gǫp)

  1. gap, empty space
    • Vǫluspá, verse 3, lines 7-8, in 1860, T. Möbius, Edda Sæmundar hins fróða: mit einem Anhang zum Theil bisher ungedruckter Gedichte. Leipzig, page 1:
      [] gap var ginnunga, / en gras hvergi.
      [] gap was of void, / but grass nowhere.
  2. (figuratively) shouting, crying, gab
    • Haralds saga herdráða 64, in 1868, C. R. Unger, G. Vigfússon, Flateyjarbok. Udg. efter offentlig foranstaltning, Volume 3. Christiania, page 425:
      [] þar uar suo mikit hareyste og gap []
      [] there was so much noise and gab []

Declension

Derived terms

Related terms

Descendants

References

  • gap in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • gap in An Icelandic-English Dictionary, R. Cleasby and G. Vigfússon, Clarendon Press, 1874, at Internet Archive.
  • gap in A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, G. T. Zoëga, Clarendon Press, 1910, at Internet Archive.

Polish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡap/

Noun

gap m pers

  1. (usually in the plural, derogatory) gawker, gaper, mindless onlooker, rubbernecker
    Synonym: gapowicz

Usage notes

  • Because this word inflects as if it contained a terminal [pʲ], which no longer exists in Polish and cannot be represented in Polish orthography, the nominative singular form is in practice used only as a lemma in dictionaries. Most native speakers only recognize this word in its inflected forms.

Declension

Noun

gap f

  1. genitive plural of gapa

Verb

gap

  1. second-person singular imperative of gapić

Further reading

  • gap in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • gap in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Swedish

Etymology

From Old Norse gap

Noun

gap n

  1. chasm or abyss
  2. gap; an opening that implies a breach or defect.
  3. a mouth, especially when wide open
  4. the space between the jaws of a wrench

Declension

Related terms

Anagrams

  • Apg., p.g.a., pga


English

Etymology

From Middle English spreden, from Old English sprǣdan (to spread, expand), from Proto-Germanic *spraidijaną (to spread), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)per- (to strew, sow, sprinkle). Cognate with Saterland Frisian spreede (to spread), West Frisian spriede (to spread), North Frisian spriedjen (to spread), Dutch spreiden (to spread), Low German spreden (to spread), German spreiten (to spread, spread out), Norwegian spre, spreie (to spread, disseminate), Swedish sprida (to spread), Latin spernō, spargō, Ancient Greek σπείρω (speírō), Persian سپردن(sepordan, to deposit), English spurn.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /spɹɛd/
  • Rhymes: -ɛd

Verb

spread (third-person singular simple present spreads, present participle spreading, simple past and past participle spread)

  1. (transitive) To stretch out, open out (a material etc.) so that it more fully covers a given area of space. [from 13th c.]
  2. (transitive) To extend (individual rays, limbs etc.); to stretch out in varying or opposing directions. [from 13th c.]
  3. (transitive) To disperse, to scatter or distribute over a given area. [from 13th c.]
  4. (intransitive) To proliferate; to become more widely present, to be disseminated. [from 13th c.]
  5. (transitive) To disseminate; to cause to proliferate, to make (something) widely known or present. [from 14th c.]
  6. (intransitive) To take up a larger area or space; to expand, be extended. [from 14th c.]
  7. (transitive) To smear, to distribute in a thin layer. [from 16th c.]
  8. (transitive) To cover (something) with a thin layer of some substance, as of butter. [from 16th c.]
  9. To prepare; to set and furnish with provisions.
    to spread a table
    • ?, Alfred Tennyson, The Marriage of Geraint
      Boiled the flesh, and spread the board.
  10. (intransitive, slang) To open one’s legs, especially for sexual favours. [from 20th c.]
    • 1984, Martin Amis, Money:
      This often sounds like the rap of a demented DJ: the way she moves has got to be good news, can’t get loose till I feel the juice— suck and spread, bitch, yeah bounce for me baby.
    • 1991, Tori Amos, Me and a Gun:
      Yes I wore a slinky red thing. Does that mean I should spread for you, your friends, your father, Mr Ed?
    • 2003, Outkast, “Spread” (from the album Speakerboxxx/The Love Below):
      I don’t want to move too fast, but / Can’t resist your sexy ass / Just spread, spread for me; / (I can’t, I can’t wait to get you home)

Synonyms

  • disseminate
  • circulate
  • propagate
  • diffuse
  • put about

Derived terms

Translations

Noun

spread (countable and uncountable, plural spreads)

  1. The act of spreading.
  2. Something that has been spread.
  3. (cartomancy) A layout, pattern or design of cards arranged for a reading.
  4. An expanse of land.
    • November 29, 1712, Andrew Freeport, a letter to The Spectator
      I have got a fine spread of improvable lands.
  5. A large tract of land used to raise livestock; a cattle ranch.
    • 2005, Brokeback Mountain (film), 00:11:50:
      – Can’t wait till I get my own spread and won’t have to put up with Joe Aguirre’s crap no more.
      – I’m savin’ for a place myself.
  6. A piece of material used as a cover (such as a bedspread).
    • 1975, Douglas Matthews, ‎Suzanne Wymelenberg, ‎Susan Cheever Cowley, Secondhand is Better (page 166)
      Linen shawls and spreads show up in secondhand clothing stores like those in the row on St. Marks Place in New York City.
  7. A large meal, especially one laid out on a table.
  8. (bread, etc.) Any form of food designed to be spread, such as butters or jams.
  9. (prison slang, uncountable) Food improvised by inmates from various ingredients to relieve the tedium of prison food.
    Synonym: swole
  10. An item in a newspaper or magazine that occupies more than one column or page.
  11. Two facing pages in a book, newspaper etc.
  12. A numerical difference.
  13. (business, economics) The difference between the wholesale and retail prices.
  14. (trading, economics, finance) The difference between the price of a futures month and the price of another month of the same commodity.
  15. (trading, finance) The purchase of a futures contract of one delivery month against the sale of another futures delivery month of the same commodity.
  16. (trading, finance) The purchase of one delivery month of one commodity against the sale of that same delivery month of a different commodity.
  17. (trading) An arbitrage transaction of the same commodity in two markets, executed to take advantage of a profit from price discrepancies.
  18. (trading) The difference between bidding and asking price.
  19. (finance) The difference between the prices of two similar items.
  20. (geometry) An unlimited expanse of discontinuous points.
  21. The surface in proportion to the depth of a cut gemstone.

Synonyms

  • straddle

Translations

Further reading

  • spread in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • spread in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • Padres, Persad, drapes, dreaps, padres, parsed, rasped, repads, spader, spared

Italian

Etymology

English spread

Noun

spread m (invariable)

  1. (trading, finance) the difference between returns or between quotations of multiple securities or of the same security over the course of a day
  2. a contract awarding which offers the buyer the widest range of bargaining possibilities

Anagrams

  • sperda

Portuguese

Etymology

Borrowed from English spread.

Noun

spread m (plural spreads)

  1. (business, economics) spread (the difference between the wholesale and retail prices)
  2. (finance, economics) difference between the interest rate a bank charges to a client and the interest rate it pays

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial