garble vs warp what difference

what is difference between garble and warp

English

Etymology

From Middle English garbelen, from Anglo-Norman garbeler (to sift), from Medieval Latin garbellare (or a similar Italian word), from Arabic غَرْبَلَ(ḡarbala, to sift).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡɑː(ɹ)bəl/
  • Rhymes: -ɑː(ɹ)bəl

Verb

garble (third-person singular simple present garbles, present participle garbling, simple past and past participle garbled)

  1. To pick out such parts (of a text) as may serve a purpose; to mutilate; to pervert
  2. To make false by mutilation or addition [from 17th c.]
  3. (obsolete) To sift or bolt, to separate the fine or valuable parts of from the coarse and useless parts, or from dross or dirt [14th–19th c.]

Derived terms

  • garbley gook

Translations

Noun

garble (countable and uncountable, plural garbles)

  1. Confused or unintelligible speech.
    • 1976, Boating (volume 40, numbers 1-2, page 152)
      The FCC says it decided to attempt standardization of VHF receivers after getting “thousands of complaints” from disgruntled boatmen who found their sets brought in mostly a lot of garble and static.
  2. (obsolete) Refuse; rubbish.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Wolcott to this entry?)
  3. (obsolete) Impurities separated from spices, drugs, etc.; garblings.

Further reading

  • garble in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • garble in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • Gabler, Grable, garbel


English

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /wɔːp/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /wɔɹp/
  • (General New Zealand) IPA(key): /woːp/
  • Rhymes: -ɔː(ɹ)p

Etymology 1

From Middle English warp, werp, from Old English wearp, warp (a warp, threads stretched lengthwise in a loom, twig, osier), from Proto-Germanic *warpą (a warp), from Proto-Indo-European *werb- (to turn, bend). Cognate with Middle Dutch warp, Middle Low German warp, German Warf, Danish varp, Swedish varp.

Noun

warp (countable and uncountable, plural warps)

  1. (uncountable) The state, quality, or condition of being twisted, physically or mentally:
    1. (uncountable) The state, quality, or condition of being physically bent or twisted out of shape.
      • 1920, The British Journal of Photography, volume 67, page 246:
        All frames found to suffer from warp should be broken up straight away before the printer is tempted during a rush to make use of them.
      • 2001, Roland Johnson, Automotive Woodworking : Restoration, Repair and Replacement →ISBN:
        Rough lumber is rarely perfectly straight, and may suffer from warp,
      • 1992, Innovation, volumes 11-12, page 32:
        The part is not fragile, does not need benching to remove “stair-stepping” on curved surfaces and does not need post curing. It does not suffer from warp, sag or curl.
      • 1992, Progrès scientifique au service du bois (International Union of Forestry Research Organizations. Division 5. Conference), page 503:
        [] and Senft found that the fibril angle in both the Pinus and Populus was high in juvenile wood, indicating that both are likely to exhibit warp in drying.
    2. (uncountable) The state, quality, or condition of being deviant from what is right or proper morally or mentally.
      • 1933, Journal of the National Proctologic Association, volume 6, issue 5, page 126:
        He believed that we were suffering from warp or bias, that a blind spot contorted our mental vision.
      • 1966, Man and International Relations: Conflict, page 306:
        [] and may discover that the potency of this politician-father had so altered the freedom with which corrective authority could be imposed on his son that to an extraordinary extent the person as an adult continues to suffer from warp acquired at home as a child.
  2. (countable) A distortion:
    1. (countable) A distortion or twist, such as in a piece of wood (also used figuratively).
      • 1998, Gary May, Hard Oiler!: The Story of Canadians’ Quest for Oil at Home, page 86:
        Wills, too, was struck down by a pole but was saved because a warp in the wood bent upwards, creating a pocket for his body.
      • 2014, July Crisis: The World’s Descent into War, Summer 1914, page 396:
        In yet another ironic twist in a story richly endowed with such warps, the Tsar’s telegram crossed one despatched in the other direction.
    2. (countable) A mental or moral distortion, deviation, or aberration.
      • 1905, Therapeutic Gazette, page 752:
        It is interesting to note that it has been suggested by Lugaro to partially extirpate the thyroid in cases of moral insanity; an excessive secretion of thyroid being regarded as the cause of excessive amativeness, thieving, and other mental warps []
  3. (weaving) The threads that run lengthwise in a woven fabric; crossed by the woof or weft.
  4. (figuratively) The foundation, the basis, the undergirding.
    • 1993, The Sociological Tradition →ISBN, page 251:
      The sense of sin (enforced by piacular rites) is as important to social integration as the committing of crimes (in due proportion) which alone can cause the mobilization of moral values that is the warp of society and of human conscience.
    • 2013, The WPA Guide to North Carolina: The Tar Heel State, page 388:
      This stretch is typical of the Piedmont section, where the warp of the economic structure is agriculture and the woof industry.
  5. (nautical) A line or cable or rode as is used in warping (mooring or hauling) a ship, and sometimes for other purposes such as deploying a seine or creating drag.
    • 1743, Robert Drury, The Pleasant, and Surprizing Adventures of Mr. Robert Drury, during his Fifteen Years Captivity on the Island of Madagascar, London, pp. 11-12,[1]
      We finish’d the Raft that Night, and in the Morning sent Mr. Prat, our Chief Mate, and four Men in the Boat with a long Rope for a Warp, to fasten on the Land.
    • 1966, Peter Tangvald, Sea Gypsy, page 24:
      [] trailed one of my sea anchors or at least some warps in order to ease the ship []
  6. A theoretical construct that permits travel across a medium without passing through it normally, such as a teleporter or time warp.
  7. A situation or place which is or seems to be from another era; a time warp.
    • 2003, Lynne B. Sagalyn, Times Square Roulette: Remaking the City Icon, page 67:
      If Times Square nevertheless remained a metaphor for the city’s changing dynamics, it was stuck in a warp of immobility, unable to push itself forward as it had in the early part of the twentieth century.
    • 2012, Sîan Ede, Art and Science, page 68:
      Evolutionary psychology often seems to be stuck in a warp on the grassy African plains, even though we know that early humans didn’t stay on the Savannah but moved from around 2 million years ago out of Africa into quite different terrains.
    • 2012, Richard Grossinger, Dark Pool of Light, Volume Three, page 105:
      To succeed routinely at mind-reading or telekinesis or love charms would result in no learning, no amusement, no spiritual growth (for a companion parable, check out Bill Murray’s Groundhog Day). We would be stuck in a warp []
  8. The sediment which subsides from turbid water; the alluvial deposit of muddy water artificially introduced into low lands in order to enrich or fertilise them.
    • 1902, C. K. Eddowes, speaking before the Royal Commission on Salmon Fisheries, as recorded in the Parliamentary Papers, House of Commons, volume 13, page 99:
      The silt is brought down and the strong tide of the Humber brings it up in very large quantities, so that the river the whole way through nearly is exceedingly thick. Added to that I may say that we suffer from warp to a tremendous extent.
  9. (obsolete outside dialects) A throw or cast, as of fish (in which case it is used as a unit of measure: about four fish, though sometimes three or even two), oysters, etc.
    a warp of fish
Derived terms
  • warp and weft
  • warp and woof
  • warp drive
  • warp factor
  • warp speed
  • time warp
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English werpen, weorpen, worpen, from Old English weorpan (to throw, cast, cast down, cast away, throw off, throw out, expel, throw upon, throw open, drive away, sprinkle, hit, hand over, lay hands on (a person), cast lots, charge with, accuse of), from Proto-Germanic *werpaną (to throw, turn), from Proto-Indo-European *werb- (to bend, turn). Cognate with Scots warp (to throw, warp), North Frisian werpen (to throw), Dutch werpen (to throw, cast), German werfen (to throw, cast), Icelandic verpa (to throw).

Verb

warp (third-person singular simple present warps, present participle warping, simple past and past participle warped)

  1. To twist or become twisted, physically or mentally:
    1. (transitive) To twist or turn (something) out of shape; to deform.
      • 1798, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, The Rime of the Ancient Mariner
        The planks looked warped.
      • Walter warped his mouth at this / To something so mock solemn, that I laughed.
    2. (intransitive) To become twisted out of shape; to deform.
    3. (transitive) To deflect or turn (something) away from a true, proper or moral course; to pervert; to bias.
      • This first avowed, nor folly warped my mind.
    4. (intransitive) To go astray or be deflected from a true, proper or moral course; to deviate.
  2. (transitive, intransitive, obsolete, ropemaking) To run (yarn) off the reel into hauls to be tarred.
  3. (transitive) To arrange (strands of thread, etc) so that they run lengthwise in weaving.
  4. (transitive, intransitive, rare, obsolete, figuratively) To plot; to fabricate or weave (a plot or scheme).
    • (Can we find and add a quotation of Nares to this entry?)
  5. (transitive, rare, obsolete, poetic) To change or fix (make fixed, for example by freezing).
  6. To move:
    1. (transitive, nautical) To move a vessel by hauling on a line or cable that is fastened to an anchor or pier; (especially) to move a sailing ship through a restricted place such as a harbour.
    2. (intransitive, nautical, of a ship) To move or be moved by this method.
    3. (intransitive, rare, dated) To fly with a bending or waving motion, like a flock of birds or insects.
    4. (transitive, intransitive, science fiction) To travel or transport across a medium without passing through it normally, as by using a teleporter or time warp.
  7. (transitive, intransitive, obsolete outside dialects, of an animal) To bring forth (young) prematurely.
  8. (transitive, intransitive, agriculture) To fertilize (low-lying land) by letting the tide, a river, or other water in upon it to deposit silt and alluvial matter.
  9. (transitive, very rare, obsolete) To throw.
Derived terms
  • warped (adjective)
Descendants
  • Japanese: ワープ (wāpu)
Translations

Further reading

  • warp at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • warp in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • wrap

Middle Dutch

Verb

warp

  1. first/third-person singular past indicative of werpen

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • warpe, werp, werpe, werppe

Etymology

From Old English wearp, warp, from Proto-West Germanic *warp, from Proto-Germanic *warpą. Related to werpen.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /warp/, /wɛrp/

Noun

warp

  1. warp (lengthwise threads)
  2. warp thread
  3. (rare) weft (horizontal threads)
  4. (rare) cast of fish
  5. (nautical, rare) rope for hauling ships

Descendants

  • English: warp
  • Scots: warp

References

  • “warp, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007.

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