garish vs loud what difference

what is difference between garish and loud

English

Etymology

Of unknown origin, possibly from obsolete Middle English gawren (to stare) which is of uncertain origin, probably from Old Norse (to watch, heed) or gaurr (rough fellow) (Proto-Indo-European *gʰow-rós, from *gʰew- (to be angry)). Compare with English gaw.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡɛəɹɪʃ/

Adjective

garish (comparative more garish, superlative most garish)

  1. Overly ostentatious; so colourful as to be in bad taste. [from 1540s]
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:gaudy

Derived terms

  • garishly
  • garishness

Translations

References

Anagrams

  • Harigs, girahs, girsha


English

Alternative forms

  • lowd (obsolete)

Pronunciation

  • enPR: loud, IPA(key): /laʊd/
  • Rhymes: -aʊd

Etymology 1

From Middle English loude, loud, lud, from Old English hlūd (loud, noisy, sounding, sonorous), from Proto-West Germanic *hlūd, from Proto-Germanic *hlūdaz, *hlūþaz (heard), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱlewtos (heard, famous), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱlew- (to hear). More at listen.

Adjective

loud (comparative louder, superlative loudest)

  1. (of a sound) Of great intensity.
  2. (of a person, thing, event, etc.) Noisy.
    • 1611, Bible (King James Version), Proverbs vii. 11
      She is loud and stubborn.
  3. (of a person, event, etc.) Not subtle or reserved, brash.
  4. (of clothing, decorations, etc.) Having unpleasantly and tastelessly contrasting colours or patterns; gaudy.
  5. (of marijuana, slang) High-quality; premium; (by extension) having a strong or pungent odour indicating good quality
Synonyms
  • (of clothing, etc): garish, gaudy
Antonyms
  • (sound): quiet, soft
  • (person): quiet
Derived terms
Translations

Noun

loud (countable and uncountable, plural louds)

  1. (colloquial) A loud sound or part of a sound.
    • 2012, Sam McGuire, Paul Lee, The Video Editor’s Guide to Soundtrack Pro (page 103)
      The expander doesn’t really make the louds louder and the softs softer in one step []
  2. (slang, uncountable) High-quality marijuana.
See also
  • dank

Etymology 2

From Middle English loude, from Old English hlūde (loudly), from Proto-Germanic *hlūda, *hlūdô (loudly), related to Etymology 1.

Adverb

loud (comparative louder, superlative loudest)

  1. Loudly.
    • c. 1597, William Shakespeare, Henry IV, Part 2, Act II, Scene 4,[1]
      Who knocks so loud at door?
    • 1749, Henry Fielding, The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling, Dublin: John Smith, Volume 2, Book 7, Chapter 14, pp. 71-72,[2]
      Unluckily that worthy Officer having, in a literal Sense, taken his Fill of Liquor, had been some Time retired to his Bolster, where he was snoaring so loud, that it was not easy to convey a Noise in at his Ears capable of drowning that which issued from his Nostrils.

Anagrams

  • Ludo, ludo, ludo-, ould

Middle English

Etymology 1

From Old English hlūd.

Adjective

loud

  1. Alternative form of loude (loud)

Etymology 2

From Old English hlūde.

Adverb

loud

  1. Alternative form of loude (loudly)

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