garland vs wreath what difference

what is difference between garland and wreath

English

Etymology

From Middle English garland, garlaunde, gerland, from Old French garlande, garlaunde, gerlande, guerlande (compare French guirlande), from Frankish *wierlōn, *wieralōn, a frequentative form of Frankish *wierōn (to adorn, bedeck), from *wiera (a gold thread), akin to Old High German wieren (to adorn), Old High German wiara (gold thread). More at wire.

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈɡɑɹlənd/

Noun

garland (plural garlands)

  1. A wreath, especially one of plaited flowers or leaves, worn on the body or draped as a decoration.
    • Bestow a Garland only on a Bier
  2. An accolade or mark of honour.
  3. (mining) A metal gutter placed round a mineshaft on the inside, to catch water running down inside the shaft and run it into a drainpipe.
  4. The crown of a monarch.
    • 1569, Richard Grafton, A Chronicle at Large
      [she] joyfully receyued and welcommed mee, as the onely type and garland of her noble stirpe and linage
  5. (dated) A book of extracts in prose or poetry; an anthology.
    • 1765, Thomas Percy, Reliques of Ancient English Poetry
      They [ballads] began to be collected into little miscellanies under the name of garlands.
  6. The top; the thing most prized.
  7. (nautical) A sort of netted bag used by sailors to keep provisions in.
  8. (nautical) A grommet or ring of rope lashed to a spar for convenience in handling.

Translations

See also

  • chaplet

Verb

garland (third-person singular simple present garlands, present participle garlanding, simple past and past participle garlanded)

  1. (transitive) To deck or ornament something with a garland.
  2. (transitive) To form something into a garland.

Anagrams

  • Ragland


English

Etymology

See writhe.

This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: rēth, IPA(key): /ɹiːθ/
  • Rhymes: -iːθ

Noun

wreath (plural wreaths)

  1. Something twisted, intertwined, or curled.
  2. An ornamental circular band made, for example, of plaited flowers and leaves, and used as decoration; a garland or chaplet, especially one given to a victor.
  3. (heraldry) An appendage to the shield, placed above it, and supporting the crest; an orle, a torse. It generally represents a twist of two cords of silk, one tinctured like the principal metal, the other like the principal color in the coat of arms.
    Synonyms: orle, torse
  4. A defect in glass.

Translations

Verb

wreath (third-person singular simple present wreaths, present participle wreathing, simple past and past participle wreathed)

  1. To place an entwined circle of flowers upon or around something.
    • 1958, The Greek Anthology, p. 349:
      Old Nico wreathed the tomb of maiden Melitê.
  2. (transitive) To wrap around something in a circle.
    At the funeral, a circle of comrades wreathed the grave of the honored deceased.
  3. (intransitive) To curl, writhe or spiral in the form of a wreath.
    • 1816, Lord Byron, “Stanzas for Music,” 4,[1]
      Though wit may flash from fluent lips, and mirth distract the breast,
      Through midnight hours that yield no more their former hope of rest;
      ’Tis but as ivy-leaves around the ruined turret wreath
      All green and wildly fresh without, but worn and grey beneath.

Translations

See also

  • wreathe

Anagrams

  • rethaw, thawer, wahter, what’re, wrathe

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