garnish vs trim what difference

what is difference between garnish and trim

English

Etymology

From Middle English garnischen, from Old French garniss-, stem of certain forms of the verb garnir, guarnir, warnir (to provide, furnish, avert, defend, warn, fortify, garnish), from a conflation of Old Frankish *warnjan (to refuse, deny) and *warnōn (warn, protect, prepare, beware, guard oneself), from Proto-Germanic *warnijaną (to worry, care, heed) and Proto-Germanic *warnōną (to warn); both from Proto-Indo-European *wer- (to defend, protect, cover). Cognate with Old English wiernan (to withhold, be sparing of, deny, refuse, reject, decline, forbid, prevent from, avert) and warnian (to warn, caution, take warning, take heed, guard oneself against, deny). More at warn.

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈɡɑɹnɪʃ/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈɡɑːnɪʃ/

Verb

garnish (third-person singular simple present garnishes, present participle garnishing, simple past and past participle garnished)

  1. To decorate with ornaments; to adorn; to embellish.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, London: William Ponsonbie, Book 2, Canto 5, p. 253,[2]
      And all within with flowres was garnished,
    • 1710, Joseph Addison, The Tatler, No. 163, 25 April, 1710, Glasgow: Robert Urie, 1754, p. 165,[3]
      [] as that admirable writer has the best and worst verses of any among our English poets, Ned Softly has got all the bad ones without book, which he repeats upon occasion, to shew his reading, and garnish his conversation.
    • 1848, Anne Brontë, The Tenant of Wildfell Hall, Chapter 14,[4]
      [] the whip [] was garnished with a massive horse’s head of plated metal.
  2. (cooking) To ornament with something placed around it.
    a dish garnished with parsley
  3. (archaic) To furnish; to supply.
    • 1611, King James Version of the Bible, Job 26.13,[5]
      By his spirit he hath garnished the heavens; his hand hath formed the crooked serpent.
    • 1861, George Eliot, Silas Marner, Part One, Chapter 3,[6]
      [] the good-humoured, affectionate-hearted Godfrey Cass was fast becoming a bitter man, visited by cruel wishes, that seemed to enter, and depart, and enter again, like demons who had found in him a ready-garnished home.
  4. (slang, archaic) To fit with fetters; to fetter.
  5. (law) To warn by garnishment; to give notice to.
  6. (law) To have (money) set aside by court order (particularly for the payment of alleged debts); to garnishee.
    • 1966, Langston Hughes, “The Twenties: Harlem and Its Negritude” in Christopher C. De Santis (ed.), The Collected Works of Langston Hughes, Volume 9, p. 473,
      When the editorial board of Fire met again, we did not plan a new issue, but emptied our pockets to help poor Thurman whose wages were being garnished weekly because he had signed for the printer’s bills.

Derived terms

  • garnishee
  • garnishment
  • garnishor

Related terms

  • garrison
  • garment

Translations

Noun

garnish (plural garnishes)

  1. A set of dishes, often pewter, containing a dozen pieces of several types.
  2. Pewter vessels in general.
  3. Something added for embellishment.
    Synonyms: decoration, ornament
    • 1718, Matthew Prior, Alma: or, The Progress of the Mind, Canto 1, in Poems on Several Occasions, London: Jacob Tonson, p. 333,[7]
      First Poets, all the World agrees,
      Write half to profit, half to please
      Matter and figure They produce;
      For Garnish This, and That for Use;
    • 1872, George Eliot, Middlemarch, Book I, Chapter 12,[8]
      This hard-headed old Overreach approved of the sentimental song, as the suitable garnish for girls, and also as fundamentally fine, sentiment being the right thing for a song.
    • 1972, William Trevor, “The Grass Widows” in The Collected Stories, New York: Viking, 1992, p. 228,[9]
      There had been a semblance of chivalry in the attitude from which, at the beginning of their marriage, he had briefly regarded her; but forty-seven years had efficiently disposed of that garnish of politeness.
  4. Clothes; garments, especially when showy or decorative.
    • c. 1596, William Shakespeare, The Merchant of Venice, Act II, Scene 6,[10]
      So are you, sweet,
      Even in the lovely garnish of a boy.
  5. (cooking) Something set round or upon a dish as an embellishment.
  6. (slang, obsolete) Fetters.
  7. (slang, historical) A fee; specifically, in English jails, formerly an unauthorized fee demanded from a newcomer by the older prisoners.
    • 1699, B. E., A New Dictionary of the Canting Crew, London: W. Hawes et al.,[11]
      Garnish money, what is customarily spent among the Prisoners at first coming in.
    • 1751, Henry Fielding, Amelia, London: C. Cooke, 1793, Volume I, Chapter 3, p. 13,[12]
      This person then [] acquainted him that it was the custom of the place for every prisoner, upon his first arrival there, to give something to the former prisoners to make them drink. This, he said, was what they called garnish; and concluded with advising his new customer to draw his purse upon the present occasion.
  8. (US, slang) Cash.

Translations

References

Further reading

  • garnish in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • garnish in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • garnish at OneLook Dictionary Search

Anagrams

  • Harings, rashing, sharing


English

Etymology

From Middle English trimen, trymen, trümen, from Old English trymman (to make firm; strengthen), from Proto-Germanic *trumjaną (to make fast; strengthen), from Proto-Germanic *trumaz (firm; strong; sound).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tɹɪm/, [t̠ʰɹ̠̊ɪm]
  • Rhymes: -ɪm

Verb

trim (third-person singular simple present trims, present participle trimming, simple past and past participle trimmed)

  1. (transitive) To reduce slightly; to cut; especially, to remove excess.
  2. (transitive) To decorate or adorn; especially of a Christmas tree.
  3. (transitive, aviation, of an aircraft) To adjust the positions of control surfaces, sometimes using trim tabs, so as to modify or eliminate the aircraft’s tendency to pitch, roll, or yaw when the cockpit controls are released.
  4. (transitive, nautical, of a vessel) To modify the angle relative to the water by shifting cargo or ballast; to adjust for sailing; to assume, or cause to assume a certain position, or trim, in the water.
    • 1883, Robert Louis Stevenson, Treasure Island
      The captain made us trim the boat, and we got her to lie a little more evenly.
  5. (transitive, nautical, of a vessel’s sails) To modify the angle (of the sails) relative to the wind, especially to set them at the most advantageous angle.
  6. (dated) To balance; to fluctuate between parties, so as to appear to favour each.
  7. (transitive) To make trim; to put in due order for any purpose; to make right, neat, or pleasing; to adjust.
    • The hermit trimmed his little fire.
  8. (transitive, carpentry, of timber) To dress; to make smooth.
  9. (transitive, dated) To rebuke; to reprove.
  10. (transitive, dated) To beat or thrash.
  11. (transitive, historical) To cut back the wick of (a lamp) to maintain a clean, bright flame.
    • 1811, The Tradesman (volume 7, page 420)
      The lamp, or candle, which lights the binnacle, is placed in the cabin, of course the expence of one light is saved, and all the inconveniences of blowing out in a squally night, and likewise the trouble of trimming the lamp, are avoided.
  12. (transitive, by extension) To change the carbon rods of (an arc lamp).
    • 1892, English Mechanic and World of Science (page 444)
      To trim an arc lamp, first remove the old carbons and carefully and thoroughly wipe the carbon rods, holders, &c. with a clean, dry rag. [] Having cleaned the rods, next wipe out the globe and get ready the fresh carbons.

Derived terms

  • betrim

Translations

Noun

trim (countable and uncountable, plural trims)

  1. (uncountable) Decoration; especially, decoration placed along edges or borders.
  2. (countable) A haircut, especially a moderate one to touch up an existing style.
  3. Dress; gear; ornaments.
  4. (countable) The manner in which something is equipped or adorned; order; disposition.
    • 1614, George Chapman, Andromeda Liberata
      The measure and whole trim of comeliness
  5. (uncountable, aviation, of an aircraft) The state of adjustment of control surfaces such that the desired attitude can be maintained without requiring the continuous application of force to the cockpit controls.
  6. (uncountable, aviation, by extension) The mechanism(s) used to trim an aircraft in roll, pitch, and/or yaw.
  7. (uncountable, slang, mildly vulgar) Sexual intercourse.
    • 1969, Maya Angelou, I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, New York: Bantam, 1971, Chapter 35, pp. 239-240,[3]
      “Take me somewhere.”
      His response lacked dignity, but in fairness to him I admit that I had left him little chance to be suave.
      He asked, “You mean, you’re going to give me some trim?”
  8. (nautical) The fore-and-aft angle of the vessel to the water, with reference to the cargo and ballast; the manner in which a vessel floats on the water, whether on an even keel or down by the head or stern.
  9. (nautical) The arrangement of the sails with reference to the wind.

Translations

Adjective

trim (comparative trimmer, superlative trimmest)

  1. Physically fit.
  2. Slender, lean.
  3. Neat or smart in appearance.
    • 1599, William Shakespeare, Much Ado About Nothing, Act 4 Scene 1
      [] manhood is melted into curtsies, valour into compliment, and men are only turned into tongue, and trim ones too: he is now as valiant as Hercules that only tells a lie and swears it.
    • “A tight little craft,” was Austin’s invariable comment on the matron; and she looked it, always trim and trig and smooth of surface like a converted yacht cleared for action. ¶ Near her wandered her husband, orientally bland, invariably affable, [].

Translations

Adverb

trim (not comparable)

  1. (nautical) In good order; properly managed or maintained.
  2. (nautical) With sails well trimmed.

Anagrams

  • MIRT, RMIT

Albanian

Alternative forms

  • (Gheg) trajm [tɾajm]

Etymology

From Proto-Albanian *trim-, from Proto-Indo-European *ter- (soft, weak, young). Cognate with Sanskrit तरुण (táruṇa, young) and Armenian թարմ (tʿarm, young, fresh). Alternatively from Proto-Indo-European *trem(s)- (to thump; to tremble). Compare Latin tremō (tremble), Lithuanian trìmti (shake, tremble), Tocharian A tröm (in rage, fury) and Tocharian B tremi (rage, fury).

Noun

trim m (indefinite plural trima, definite singular trimi, definite plural trimat)

  1. man, manful
  2. hero
  3. courageous
  4. valiant, valorous
  5. brave, hardy

References


Dutch

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -ɪm

Verb

trim

  1. first-person singular present indicative of trimmen
  2. imperative of trimmen

Latvian

Numeral

trim

  1. dative plural masculine form of trīs
  2. instrumental plural masculine form of trīs
  3. dative plural feminine form of trīs
  4. instrumental plural feminine form of trīs

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