garrote vs scrag what difference

what is difference between garrote and scrag

English

Alternative forms

  • garrotte (UK)

Etymology

From Spanish garrote. Doublet of garrot.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡəˈɹɒt/, /ɡəˈɹoʊt/
  • Rhymes: -ɒt

Noun

garrote (plural garrotes)

  1. an iron collar formerly used in Spain to execute people by strangulation
    • 2004: Chris Wallace, Character: Profiles in Presidential Courage
      The Spanish had responded to the insurgency with characteristic brutality. They gave rebels the “usual four shots in the back” or the garrote – an iron collar tightened around the victim’s neck with a screw until he was strangled to death.
  2. something, especially a cord or wire, used for strangulation
    The mob boss was known for having his enemies executed with a garrote of piano wire.

Translations

Verb

garrote (third-person singular simple present garrotes, present participle garroting, simple past and past participle garroted)

  1. (transitive) to execute by strangulation
  2. (transitive) to kill using a garrote

See also

  • garrot

Galician

Etymology

14th century. From Old French garrot, itself either from Old Occitan garra (leg) and the suffix -ot, from Gaulish *garrā (leg), or from a Germanic source.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡaˈrɔte̝/

Noun

garrote m (plural garrotes)

  1. garrot used to limit the movement of an animal
  2. bolt or garrot which affixes each wheel to the axletree of a traditional Galician cart
    Synonyms: gorrón, torno
  3. (archaic) press
    • 1357, Enrique Cal Pardo (ed.), “De Viveiro en la Edad Media”, Estudios Mindonienses, 7, page 139:
      afforo […] a meatade de toda essa minna binna, con o herdamento que ias a par dela […] con a meatade do lagar et garrote que y esta assy commo esta acaroada de muro

      I rent to you […] half of my vineyard, with the possessions that are adjacent to it […] with half of the winepress that is there, as it is delimited by a wall

References

  • “garrote” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez – Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006-2016.
  • “garrote” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI – ILGA 2006-2013.
  • “garrote” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • “garrote” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

Italian

Noun

garrote f

  1. plural of garrota

Portuguese

Pronunciation

  • Hyphenation: gar‧ro‧te

Etymology 1

Noun

garrote m (plural garrotes)

  1. (historical) an iron necklace used for execution in Spain and Portugal
  2. (medicine) bandage used to compress a limb and prevent bleeding
    Synonyms: torniquete, atadura
  3. withers (part of a quadruped’s body between the shoulder and the neck)
    Synonym: cernelha
  4. needle
    Synonym: agulha
  5. (figuratively) angst
    Synonyms: angústia, aflição
  6. (Brazil) a calf between two and four years old
Derived terms
  • garrotar
  • garrotear

Etymology 2

Verb

garrote

  1. first-person singular (eu) present subjunctive of garrotar
  2. third-person singular (ele and ela, also used with você and others) present subjunctive of garrotar
  3. third-person singular (você) affirmative imperative of garrotar
  4. third-person singular (você) negative imperative of garrotar

Further reading

  • “garrote” in Dicionário Priberam da Língua Portuguesa.

Spanish

Etymology

From French garrot.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡaˈrote/, [ɡaˈro.t̪e]

Noun

garrote m (plural garrotes)

  1. garrote
  2. club, cudgel

Derived terms

  • agarrotar
  • garrotazo

Descendants

  • San Juan Atzingo Popoloca: caroti

Further reading

  • “garrote” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.


English

Etymology

Perhaps related to Norwegian skragg (a lean person), dialectal Swedish skragge (old and torn thing), Danish skrog (hull, carcass); perhaps related to shrink.

Pronunciation

Noun

scrag (plural scrags)

  1. (archaic) A thin or scrawny person or animal. [from the 16th c.]
    • 1946, Mervyn Peake, Titus Groan
      In any event he might have wakened the long scrag by so doing.
  2. (archaic) The lean end of a neck of mutton; the scrag end.
  3. (archaic) The neck, especially of a sheep.
  4. (Scotland) A scrog. (Can we add an example for this sense?)
  5. (Britain, slang, derogatory) A chav or ned; a stereotypically loud and aggressive person of lower social class.
  6. (Australia, slang, derogatory) A rough or unkempt woman.
  7. A ragged, stunted tree or branch.

Verb

scrag (third-person singular simple present scrags, present participle scragging, simple past and past participle scragged)

  1. (obsolete, colloquial) To hang on a gallows, or to choke, garotte, or strangle.
    • Pall Mall Magazine
      An enthusiastic mob will scrag me to a certainty the day war breaks out.
    • 1991, Stephen Fry, The Liar, p. 37:
      Adrian thought it worth while to try out his new slang… ‘That’s beastly talk, Thompson. Jolly well take it back or expect a good scragging.’
  2. To harass; to manhandle.
    • 1958, P. G. Wodehouse, chapter 15, in Cocktail Time:
      ‘…I urged him … to … try the Ickenham System … a little thing I knocked together in my bachelor days … it has a good many points in common with all-in wrestling and osteopathy. I generally recommend it to diffident wooers and it always works like magic…’
      Johnny stared.
      ‘You mean you told McMurdo to … scrag her?’
  3. To destroy or kill.

Translations

Anagrams

  • CAGRs, crags

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