gash vs slash what difference

what is difference between gash and slash

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡæʃ/
  • Rhymes: -æʃ

Etymology 1

Alteration of older garsh, from Middle English garsen, from Old French garser, jarsier (Modern French gercer), from Vulgar Latin *charaxāre, from Ancient Greek χαρακτήρ (kharaktḗr, engraver).

Alternative forms

  • garsh (dated)

Noun

gash (countable and uncountable, plural gashes)

  1. A deep cut.
    • 2006, New York Times, “Bush Mourns 9/11 at Ground Zero as N.Y. Remembers”, [1]:
      Vowing that he was “never going to forget the lessons of that day,” President Bush paid tribute last night to the victims of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attack, laying wreaths at ground zero, attending a prayer service at St. Paul’s Chapel and making a surprise stop at a firehouse and a memorial museum overlooking the vast gash in the ground where the twin towers once stood.
  2. (slang, vulgar) A vulva.
    • 1959, William S. Burroughs, Naked Lunch, 50th anniversary edition (2009), p. 126:
      “Oh Gertie it’s true. It’s all true. They’ve got a horrid gash instead of a thrilling thing.”
  3. (slang, offensive) A woman
    • 1934, James T. Farrell, The Young Manhood of Studs Lonigan, Ch. 19:
      “Will you bastards quit singing the blues? You’re young, and there’s plenty of gash in the world, and the supply of moon goes on forever,” Simonsky said.
  4. (slang, British Royal Navy) Rubbish, spare kit
  5. (slang) Rubbish on board an aircraft
  6. (slang) Unused film or sound during film editing
  7. (slang) Poor quality beer, usually watered down.
Translations

Adjective

gash (comparative more gash, superlative most gash)

  1. (slang) Of poor quality; makeshift; improvised; temporary; substituted.

Verb

gash (third-person singular simple present gashes, present participle gashing, simple past and past participle gashed)

  1. To make a deep, long cut; to slash.
Translations

Etymology 2

From ghastful, by association with gash.

Adjective

gash (comparative more gash, superlative most gash)

  1. (Britain, Scotland, dialect) ghastly; hideous
Related terms
  • gashful
  • gashly

Anagrams

  • HAGS, hags, shag


English

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /slaʃ/
  • (US) IPA(key): /slæʃ/
  • Hyphenation: slash
  • Rhymes: -æʃ

Etymology 1

Originally a verb of uncertain etymology. Possibly from French esclachier (to break). Used once in the Wycliffe Bible as slascht but otherwise unattested until 16th century. Conjunctive use from various applications of the punctuation mark ⟨/⟩. See also slash fiction.

Noun

slash (plural slashes)

  1. A slashing action or motion, particularly:
    1. A swift, broad, cutting stroke made by an edged weapon or whip.
    2. (cricket) A wild swinging strike of the bat.
    3. (ice hockey, lacrosse) A hard swift lateral strike with a hockey or lacrosse stick, usually across another player’s arms or legs.
    4. Any similar wide striking motion.
    5. (figuratively) A sharp reduction.
  2. A mark made by a slashing motion, particularly:
    1. A cut or laceration, often deep, made by an edged weapon or whip.
    2. (botany) A deep taper-pointed incision in a plant.
  3. Something resembling such a mark, particularly:
    1. (fashion) A slit in an outer garment exposing a lining or inner garment, usually of a contrasting color or design; any intentional long vertical cut in a garment.
    2. (US and Canada) A clearing in a forest, (particularly) those made by logging, fire, or other violent action.
      • 1895, Henry Van Dyke, Little Rivers: A Book of Essays in Profitable Idleness
        We passed over the shoulder of a ridge and around the edge of a fire slash, and then we had the mountain fairly before us.
    3. (originally US, typography) The slash mark: the punctuation mark ⟨/⟩, sometimes (often proscribed) inclusive of any mark produced by a similar slashing movement of the pen, as the backslash ⟨\⟩.
      • 1965, Dmitri A. Borgmann, Language on Vacation, page 240:
        Initial inquiries among professional typists uncover names like slant, slant line, slash, and slash mark. Examination of typing instruction manuals discloses additional names such as diagonal and diagonal mark, and other sources provide the designation oblique.
    4. (vulgar, slang) Female genitalia.
  4. (US and Canada) The loose woody debris remaining from a slash, (particularly forestry) the trimmings left while preparing felled trees for removal.
  5. (fandom slang) Slash fiction.
    • 2013, Katherine Arcement, “Diary”, London Review of Books, vol. 35, no. 5:
      Comments merely allow readers to proclaim themselves mortally offended by the content of a story, despite having been warned in large block letters of INCEST or SLASH (any kind of sex between two men or two women: the term originated with the Kirk/Spock pairing – it described the literal slash between their names).
Synonyms
  • (deep cut): gash
  • (typographic mark): slash mark; solidus (formal name); stroke (chiefly UK); forward slash, forward stroke, foreslash, frontslash, front slash (sometimes proscribed); virgule (marking line breaks); shilling mark (UK, historical currency sign); slants, slant lines (marking pronunciations); separatrix (proofreading mark); scratch comma (former use as a form of comma); oblique, oblique mark, oblique stroke, oblique dash (chiefly UK, dated); diagonal, diagonal mark (dated); virgula (obsolete); virgil (UK, obsolete); whack (improper); bar (improper, obsolete)
  • (vulgar term for female genitalia): See cunt
Antonyms
  • backslash
Hypernyms
  • (typographic mark): fraction bar (in fractions); division sign (in division)
Hyponyms
  • division slash
  • fraction slash
Derived terms
Related terms
Translations
See also

Punctuation

Verb

slash (third-person singular simple present slashes, present participle slashing, simple past and past participle slashed)

  1. To cut or attempt to cut, particularly:
    1. To cut with a swift broad stroke of an edged weapon.
    2. To produce a similar wound with a savage strike of a whip.
    3. (ice hockey) To strike swiftly and laterally with a hockey stick, usually across another player’s arms or legs.
    4. (figuratively) To reduce sharply.
    5. (fashion) To create slashes in a garment.
    6. (figuratively) To criticize cuttingly.
  2. To strike violently and randomly, particularly:
    1. (cricket) To swing wildly at the ball.
  3. To move quickly and violently.
  4. To crack a whip with a slashing motion.
  5. (US, Canada) To clear land, (particularly forestry) with violent action such as logging or brushfires or (agriculture, uncommon) through grazing.
  6. (intransitive, fandom slang) To write slash fiction.
Synonyms
  • (to strike with a whip): lash, scourge, thrash
  • (to strike a whip): crack
Derived terms
Coordinate terms
  • (slash fiction): ship
Translations

Adverb

slash (not comparable)

  1. Used to note the sound or action of a slash.

Conjunction

slash

  1. (US and Canada) Used to connect two or more identities in a list.
    • 2001, Fabio Lanzoni, Zoolander:
      What this, the Slashie, means is that you consider me the best actor slash model and not the other way around.
  2. (US and Canada) Used to list alternatives.
    Alternatives can be marked by the slash/stroke/solidus punctuation mark, a tall, right-slanting oblique line.

    Read: Alternatives can be marked by the slash-slash-stroke-slash-solidus punctuation mark, a tall, right-slanting oblique line.
Usage notes

Typically written with the slash mark ⟨/⟩ and only spoken or transcribed as the word “slash”. Often omitted from speech and only marked as a brief pause between the alternatives. Exclusively omitted in common constructions such as and/or, either/or, and washer/dryer.

Synonyms
  • (exclusive or): or
  • (inclusive or): and, or, and/or
  • (UK): stroke

Further reading

  • slash on Wikipedia.Wikipedia

Etymology 2

Of uncertain etymology. Compare Scots slash (large splash), possibly from Old French esclache. Slang use for urination attested from the 1950s.

Noun

slash (plural slashes)

  1. (obsolete, rare) A drink of something; a draft.
  2. (vulgar, Britain, slang) A piss: an act of urination.
    Where’s the gents? I need to take a slash.

Verb

slash (third-person singular simple present slashes, present participle slashing, simple past and past participle slashed)

  1. (Britain, slang, intransitive) To piss, to urinate.
    • 1973, Martin Amis, The Rachel Papers, page 189:
      If you can slash in my bed (I thought) don’t tell me you can’t suck my cock.
Translations

Etymology 3

Of uncertain etymology. Compare flash (a marsh; a pool of water) and British dialectal slashy (wet and dirty, miry).

Noun

slash (plural slashes)

  1. (US) A swampy area; a swamp.
  2. (Scotland) A large quantity of watery food such as broth.

Verb

slash (third-person singular simple present slashes, present participle slashing, simple past and past participle slashed)

  1. (Scotland, intransitive) To work in wet conditions.

Etymology 4

See slatch

Noun

slash (plural slashes)

  1. (Britain) Alternative form of slatch: a deep trough of finely-fractured culm or a circular or elliptical pocket of coal.

References

  • Oxford English Dictionary, 1st ed. “slash, v.¹ & v.²” & “slash, n.¹, n.², n.³, & n.⁴“. Oxford University Press (Oxford), 1911.

Anagrams

  • LSSAH

Spanish

Noun

slash m (plural slash)

  1. (punctuation) slash

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial