gat vs rod what difference

what is difference between gat and rod

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡæt/
  • Rhymes: -æt

Etymology 1

From Gatling gun, after inventor Richard Gatling.

Noun

gat (plural gats)

  1. (archaic, slang, in old westerns) A Gatling gun.
  2. (originally 1920s gangster slang) Any type of gun, usually a pistol.
    • 1939, Raymond Chandler, The Big Sleep.
      You’re the second guy I’ve met within hours who seems to think a gat in the hand means a world by the tail.
    • 1988, N.W.A, Straight Outta Compton
      Goin’ off on a motherfucker like that
      With a gat that’s pointed at yo ass
Translations

Verb

gat (third-person singular simple present gats, present participle gatting, simple past and past participle gatted)

  1. (slang) To shoot someone with a pistol or other handheld firearm.

Etymology 2

From guitar, by shortening

Noun

gat (plural gats)

  1. (New Zealand, slang) A guitar

Etymology 3

Verb

gat

  1. (Scotland and Northern England or archaic) simple past tense of get
    • Genesis 19:27
      And Abraham gat up early in the morning

Etymology 4

From Icelandic [Term?].

Noun

gat (plural gats)

  1. An opening between sandbanks; a strait.

Etymology 5

From Korean (gat).

Alternative forms

  • kat

Noun

gat (plural gats)

  1. A traditional Korean hat made of horsehair, once worn by married gentlemen.

Anagrams

  • ATG, GTA, TAG, TGA, tag

Afrikaans

Etymology

From Dutch gat (hole, gap; arse), from Middle Dutch gat, from Old Dutch *gat, from Proto-Germanic *gatą.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /χat/

Noun

gat (plural gate, diminutive gaatjie)

  1. hole; perforation
  2. gap; opening
  3. hole or hollowed out area used as a shelter or home by animals
  4. (figuratively) dump; a run-down living space, room or house
  5. (golf) hole; cup

Synonyms

  • (gap): gaping
  • (golf): putjie

Derived terms

  • gatvol

Noun

gat (plural gatte, diminutive gatjie)

  1. (vulgar) anus
  2. (crude) rump; buttocks; bum; ass; backside of a human
  3. the backside of animals or objects

Synonyms

  • (backside, ass): agterstewe, blaker, stert
  • (anus): hol, poephol

Derived terms

  • gatkant
  • kaalgat

Anagrams

  • agt

Catalan

Etymology

From Old Occitan [Term?] (compare Occitan gat, cat), from Late Latin cattus (cat) (compare French chat, Spanish gato). See cat for more.

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central, Valencian) IPA(key): /ˈɡat/
  • Rhymes: -at

Noun

gat m (plural gats, feminine gata)

  1. cat (feline animal)
  2. jack (device for lifting heavy objects)
  3. cat shark

Synonyms

  • (cat): mix (colloquial), moix (colloquial)

Derived terms

Related terms

  • gata

Adjective

gat (feminine gata, masculine plural gats, feminine plural gates)

  1. (Mallorca) drunk

Further reading

  • “gat” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.

Dutch

Etymology

From Middle Dutch gat, from Old Dutch *gat, from Proto-Germanic *gatą. Doublet of gate.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɣɑt/
  • Hyphenation: gat
  • Rhymes: -ɑt

Noun

gat n (plural gaten, diminutive gaatje n)

  1. gap, hole
    Synonyms: hol, opening
  2. godforsaken place, hamlet
    Synonyms: uithoek, midden van nergens
  3. (archaic) port

Noun

gat n or m (plural gaten, diminutive gaatje n)

  1. (vulgar) arsehole, asshole
  2. (by extension, informal) the buttocks, butt, bum, rear-end, bottom of a person or animal
    • “Het regent” (nursery rhyme).
    Synonym: achterste

Derived terms

Descendants

  • Berbice Creole Dutch: gati
  • Negerhollands: gat, gad

Icelandic

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈkaːt/
  • Rhymes: -aːt

Etymology 1

From Old Norse gat, from Proto-Germanic *gatą.

Noun

gat n (genitive singular gats, nominative plural göt)

  1. hole, perforation (an opening through a solid body)
  2. (colloquial, school) a gap in a fixed schedule, an unassigned time in the schedule, usually between classes; break, free period
Declension
Derived terms
  • standa á gati (to be unable to answer a question, to be at a loss)
  • reka einhvern á gat (to stump somebody, to ask somebody a question he cannot answer)

Etymology 2

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

gat

  1. first-person singular active present indicative of geta
    Ég gat ekki stöðvað hana.

    I couldn’t stop her.
  2. third-person singular active present indicative of geta

See also

  • hola

Lower Sorbian

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *gatь (dike). Cognate with Upper Sorbian hat, Polish gać, Serbo-Croatian gat (ditch, dam).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡat/

Noun

gat m (diminutive gaśik)

  1. pond
  2. dam, embankment

Declension

Derived terms

  • gatny
  • gatojski
  • pódgataŕ
  • pódgatki

Further reading

  • Arnošt Muka (1921, 1928), “gat”, in Słownik dolnoserbskeje rěcy a jeje narěcow (in German, Russian), St. Petersburg, Prague: ОРЯС РАН, ČAVU; Reprinted (in German)Bautzen: Domowina-Verlag, 2008
  • gat in Manfred Starosta (1999): Dolnoserbsko-nimski słownik / Niedersorbisch-deutsches Wörterbuch. Bautzen: Domowina-Verlag.

Mauritian Creole

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡat/

Verb

gat

  1. Medial form of gate

Middle English

Etymology 1

Noun

gat

  1. Alternative form of gate (gate)

Etymology 2

Noun

gat

  1. Alternative form of gate (way)

Etymology 3

Noun

gat

  1. (Northern, Early Middle English) Alternative form of goot

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology 1

Verb

gat

  1. past tense of gjeta

Etymology 2

Noun

gat n (definite singular gatet, indefinite plural gat, definite plural gata or gati)

  1. form removed with the spelling reform of 2012; superseded by gatt

Nuer

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ɡat], [ɡad]

Noun

gat

  1. son

Occitan

Alternative forms

  • cat

Etymology

From Old Occitan, from Late Latin cattus (compare Catalan gat, French chat). See cat for more.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ɡat]

Noun

gat m (plural gats, feminine gata, feminine plural gatas)

  1. a cat

Related terms

  • gata

Old English

Etymology

From Proto-West Germanic *gait, from Proto-Germanic *gaits.

Cognate with Old Saxon gēt, Old Dutch *geit, Old High German geiz, Old Norse geit, Gothic ???????????????????? (gaits); and with Latin haedus (kid).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡɑːt/

Noun

gāt f

  1. goat

Declension

Coordinate terms

  • bucca (male goat)

Derived terms

  • gāthierde

Descendants

  • Middle English: goot, got, gat, gote, goet, goth, gathe
    • English: goat
      • Abenaki: kots (from “goats”)
      • Marshallese: koot
      • Rotokas: goti
      • Tongan: koti, kosi
        • Samoan: ʻoti
          • Rotuman: ʻoti
          • Tokelauan: oti
    • Scots: gait, gayt
    • Yola: geearth, geearte, gurth

Old Norse

Etymology 1

Noun

gat n

  1. hole, opening

Descendants

  • Norwegian Nynorsk: gatt

Etymology 2

Verb

gat

  1. first/third-person singular past indicative active of geta

References

  • gat in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press

Romagnol

Etymology

From Late Latin cattus (cat). See the etymology at cat for further details.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡat/, [ˈɡaɐ̯t]

Noun

gat m (plural ghét)

  1. cat (Felis silvestris catus, a domesticated feline commonly kept as a house pet)
    • December 2007, Vincenzo Sanchini, Tigrin e Biancon in la Ludla, il Papiro, page 8:
      S’i padrùn gio tla pianura,\ chi por gat j è armast te’ ghét,\ in s’è mòs da meda tl’éra,\ a raspè mla porta tchjusa.

Romanian

Etymology

From Hungarian gát

Noun

gat n (plural gaturi)

  1. (Transylvania) dam

Declension


Romansch

Alternative forms

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sutsilvan, Surmiran, Puter, Vallader) giat

Etymology

From Late Latin cattus.

Noun

gat m (plural gats)

  1. (Sursilvan, Sutsilvan) cat

Serbo-Croatian

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *gatь (dike). Cognate with Slovak hať (dam), Upper Sorbian hat, Polish gać, Lower Sorbian gat (pond, dam), and Russian гать (gatʹ, causeway).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡât/

Noun

gȁt m (Cyrillic spelling га̏т)

  1. ditch
  2. dam

Declension

References

  • “gat” in Hrvatski jezični portal

Tok Pisin

Alternative forms

  • igat

Etymology

From English got.

Verb

gat

  1. have

Derived terms

  • gat bel
  • igat
  • nogat

Venetian

Etymology

From Late Latin cattus (cat). See the etymology at cat for further details.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɡat/
  • Hyphenation: gàt

Noun

gat m (plural gati)

  1. cat (Felis silvestris catus, a domesticated feline commonly kept as a house pet)


English

Etymology

From Middle English rodde, from Old English *rodd or *rodde (attested in dative plural roddum (rod, pole)), of uncertain origin, but probably from Proto-Germanic *rudd- (stick, club), from Proto-Indo-European *rewdʰ- (to clear land). Compare Old Norse rudda (club). For the root, compare English rid. Presumably unrelated to Proto-Germanic *rōdō (rod, pole).

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ɹɒd/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ɹɑd/
  • Rhymes: -ɒd

Noun

rod (plural rods)

  1. A straight, round stick, shaft, bar, cane, or staff.
    The circus strong man proved his strength by bending an iron rod, and then straightening it.
  2. A longitudinal pole used for forming part of a framework such as an awning or tent.
  3. (fishing) A long slender usually tapering pole used for angling; fishing rod.
    When I hooked a snake and not a fish, I got so scared I dropped my rod in the water.
  4. A stick, pole, or bundle of switches or twigs (such as a birch), used for personal defense or to administer corporal punishment by whipping.
  5. An implement resembling and/or supplanting a rod (particularly a cane) that is used for corporal punishment, and metonymically called the rod, regardless of its actual shape and composition.
    The judge imposed on the thief a sentence of fifteen strokes with the rod.
  6. A stick used to measure distance, by using its established length or task-specific temporary marks along its length, or by dint of specific graduated marks.
    I notched a rod and used it to measure the length of rope to cut.
  7. (archaic) A unit of length equal to 1 pole, a perch, 14 chain, 5+12 yards, 16+12 feet, or exactly 5.0292 meters (these being all equivalent).
    • 1842, Edgar Allan Poe, ‘The Mystery of Marie Rogêt’:
      ‘And this thicket, so full of a natural art, was in the immediate vicinity, within a few rods, of the dwelling of Madame Deluc, whose boys were in the habit of closely examining the shrubberies about them in search of the bark of the sassafras.’
    • 1865, Henry David Thoreau, Cape Cod
      In one of the villages I saw the next summer a cow tethered by a rope six rods long [].
    • 1900, Charles W. Chesnutt, The House Behind the Cedars, Ch.I:
      A few rods farther led him past the old black Presbyterian church, with its square tower, embowered in a stately grove; past the Catholic church, with its many crosses, and a painted wooden figure of St. James in a recess beneath the gable; and past the old Jefferson House, once the leading hotel of the town, in front of which political meetings had been held, and political speeches made, and political hard cider drunk, in the days of “Tippecanoe and Tyler too.”
  8. An implement held vertically and viewed through an optical surveying instrument such as a transit, used to measure distance in land surveying and construction layout; an engineer’s rod, surveyor’s rod, surveying rod, leveling rod, ranging rod. The modern (US) engineer’s or surveyor’s rod commonly is eight or ten feet long and often designed to extend higher. In former times a surveyor’s rod often was a single wooden pole or composed of multiple sectioned and socketed pieces, and besides serving as a sighting target was used to measure distance on the ground horizontally, hence for convenience was of one rod or pole in length, that is, 5+12 yards.
  9. (archaic) A unit of area equal to a square rod, 30+14 square yards or 1160 acre.
    The house had a small yard of about six rods in size.
  10. A straight bar that unites moving parts of a machine, for holding parts together as a connecting rod or for transferring power as a drive-shaft.
    The engine threw a rod, and then went to pieces before our eyes, springs and coils shooting in all directions.
  11. (anatomy) A rod cell: a rod-shaped cell in the eye that is sensitive to light.
    The rods are more sensitive than the cones, but do not discern color.
  12. (biology) Any of a number of long, slender microorganisms.
    He applied a gram positive stain, looking for rods indicative of Listeria.
  13. (chemistry) A stirring rod: a glass rod, typically about 6 inches to 1 foot long and 18 to 14 inch in diameter that can be used to stir liquids in flasks or beakers.
  14. (slang) A pistol; a gun.
  15. (slang, vulgar) A penis.
  16. (slang) A hot rod, an automobile or other passenger motor vehicle modified to run faster and often with exterior cosmetic alterations, especially one based originally on a pre-1940s model or (currently) denoting any older vehicle thus modified.
  17. (ufology) A rod-shaped object that appears in photographs or videos traveling at high speed, not seen by the person recording the event, often associated with extraterrestrial entities.
    • 2000, Jack Barranger, Paul Tice, Mysteries Explored: The Search for Human Origins, Ufos, and Religious Beginnings, Book Three, p.37:
      These cylindrical rods fly through the air at incredible speeds and can only be picked up by high-speed cameras.
    • 2009, Barry Conrad, An Unknown Encounter: A True Account of the San Pedro Haunting, Dorrance Publishing, pp.129–130:
      During one such broadcast in 1997, the esteemed radio host bellowed, “I got a fax earlier today from MUFON (Mutual UFO Network) in Arizona and they said what you think are rods are actually insects!”
    • 2010, Deena West Budd, The Weiser Field Guide to Cryptozoology: Werewolves, Dragons, Skyfish, Lizard Men, and Other Fascinating Creatures Real and Mysterious, Weiser Books, p.15:
      He tells of a home video showing a rod flying into the open mouth of a girl singing at a wedding.
  18. (mathematics) A Cuisenaire rod.
  19. (rail transport) A coupling rod or connecting rod, which links the driving wheels of a steam locomotive.

Synonyms

  • See also Thesaurus:stick
  • See also Thesaurus:penis
  • (objects in photographs and videos): skyfish

Derived terms

Translations

See also

  • crook

References

Further reading

  • Rod on Wikipedia.Wikipedia
  • Rod in the Encyclopædia Britannica (11th edition, 1911)

Verb

rod (third-person singular simple present rods, present participle rodding, simple past and past participle rodded)

  1. (construction) To reinforce concrete with metal rods.
  2. (transitive) To furnish with rods, especially lightning rods.
  3. (slang, vulgar, transitive) To penetrate sexually.
  4. (slang) To hot rod.

Anagrams

  • D. Or., DRO, Dor, Dor., ODR, Ord, RDO, d’or, dor, dro, ord

Breton

Etymology

From Proto-Brythonic *rrod, from Proto-Celtic *rotos, from Proto-Indo-European *Hróth₂os.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈroːt/

Noun

rod f (plural rodoù)

  1. wheel

Czech

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *rȏdъ.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈrot]

Noun

rod m

  1. family, stock, lineage
  2. (botany) genus
  3. (grammar) gender
  4. (grammar) voice

Declension

Derived terms

  • mužský rod (masculine (gender))
  • ženský rod (feminine (gender))
  • střední rod (neuter (gender))
  • činný rod (active voice) (= aktivum)
  • trpný rod (passive voice) (= pasivum)

Further reading

  • rod in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • rod in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Danish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈʁoˀð], [ˈʁoðˀ]

Etymology 1

From Old Norse rót, from Proto-Germanic *wrōts, from Proto-Indo-European *wréh₂ds. English root is borrowed from Old Norse.

Noun

rod c (singular definite roden, plural indefinite rødder)

  1. root
  2. yob
  3. (mathematics) root, zero (element



    x


    {\displaystyle x}

    in the domain of a function such that




    f
    (
    x
    )
    =
    0


    {\displaystyle f(x)=0}

    )

Inflection
Synonyms
  • (mathematics): nulpunkt
Related terms
  • gulerod
  • rodbehandling
  • rodfrugt
  • tandrod

Etymology 2

From the verb rode.

Noun

rod n (singular definite rodet, not used in plural form)

  1. disorder, mess, muddle

Etymology 3

See the etymology of the corresponding lemma form.

Verb

rod

  1. imperative of rode

East Franconian

Alternative forms

  • ruad (Itzgründisch)

Adjective

rod

  1. red

German Low German

Alternative forms

  • (Low Prussian) root (rot)

Etymology

From Old Saxon rōd, from Proto-West Germanic *raud, from Proto-Germanic *raudaz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁rowdʰós < *h₁rewdʰ-. Compare Dutch rood, German rot, West Frisian read, English red, Danish rød.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɾɔu̯t/

Adjective

rod

  1. (in several dialects) red

Hunsrik

Alternative forms

  • root (Wiesemann spelling system)

Etymology

From Middle High German rōt (red, red-haired), from Old High German rōt (red, scarlet, purple-red, brown-red, yellow-red), from Proto-West Germanic *raud, from Proto-Germanic *raudaz, from Proto-Indo-European *h₁rowdʰós, from *h₁rewdʰ-.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /roːt/

Adjective

rod (comparative roder, superlative rodest)

  1. red

Declension

Derived terms

  • weinrod

See also

Further reading

  • Online Hunsrik Dictionary

Latvian

Verb

rod

  1. 3rd person singular present indicative form of rast
  2. 3rd person plural present indicative form of rast
  3. (with the particle lai) 3rd person singular imperative form of rast
  4. (with the particle lai) 3rd person plural imperative form of rast

Lower Sorbian

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *rodъ (root), from Proto-Balto-Slavic *radas, from Proto-Indo-European *wréh₂ds (root).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /rɔt/

Noun

rod m

  1. sex (gender (male or female))
  2. lineage, family
  3. (grammar) gender

Declension

Further reading

  • Arnošt Muka (1921, 1928), “rod”, in Słownik dolnoserbskeje rěcy a jeje narěcow (in German, Russian), St. Petersburg, Prague: ОРЯС РАН, ČAVU; Reprinted (in German)Bautzen: Domowina-Verlag, 2008
  • rod in Manfred Starosta (1999): Dolnoserbsko-nimski słownik / Niedersorbisch-deutsches Wörterbuch. Bautzen: Domowina-Verlag.

Old English

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *rōdō. Cognate with Old Frisian rōd, Old Saxon rōda, Dutch roede (rod), Old High German ruota (German Rute), Old Norse róða (rod, cross) (Danish rode (gauge, rod)).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /roːd/

Noun

rōd f

  1. cross (method of execution)
  2. a measure of land length, equal to a perch
  3. a measure of land area, equal to a quarter of an acre

Usage notes

  • An archaic locative singular form, ᚱᚩᛞᛁ, appears on the Ruthwell Cross inscription.

Declension

Related terms

  • rōdfæstnian

Descendants

  • Middle English: rod, roode, rood
    • Scots: rude, ruid
    • English: rood, rod (length)

Old Saxon

Etymology

From Proto-West Germanic *raud, from Proto-Germanic *raudaz, whence also Old English rēad, Old Frisian rād, Old High German rōt, Old Norse rauðr, Gothic ???????????????????? (rauþs). Ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₁rowdʰós < *h₁rewdʰ-.

Adjective

rōd (comparative rōdoro, superlative rōdost)

  1. red

Declension


Descendants

  • Middle Low German: rōt
    • German Low German:
      Hamburgisch: rod
      Westphalian

      Sauerländisch: räod, raud, reyet, rout, rōet
      Westmünsterländisch: root
    • Plautdietsch: root

Polish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /rɔt/

Noun

rod m inan

  1. rhodium (chemical element, Rh, atomic number 45)

Declension

Further reading

  • rod in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Romanian

Etymology 1

From a Slavic language, from Proto-Slavic *rodъ.

Noun

rod n (plural roade)

  1. fruit
  2. (figuratively) fruit (advantageous result)
Declension
Synonyms
  • fruct n
  • poamă f

Etymology 2

Verb

rod

  1. first-person singular present indicative of roade
  2. first-person singular present subjunctive of roade
  3. third-person plural present indicative of roade

Serbo-Croatian

Etymology

From Proto-Slavic *rodъ.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /rôːd/

Noun

rȏd m (Cyrillic spelling ро̑д)

  1. gender
  2. (botany) genus
  3. relative, relation
  4. fruit, crop, extraction (rarely used in these senses)
  5. family, stock, lineage, kin, race

Declension

Derived terms

References

  • “rod” in Hrvatski jezični portal

Veps

Etymology

Related to ruoto.

Noun

rod

  1. bone (of fish)

Welsh

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /roːd/

Noun

rod

  1. Soft mutation of rhod.

Mutation

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