gather vs tuck what difference

what is difference between gather and tuck

English

Alternative forms

  • gether (obsolete or regional)

Etymology

From Middle English gaderen, from Old English gaderian (to gather, assemble), from Proto-West Germanic *gadurōn (to bring together, unite, gather), from Proto-Indo-European *gʰedʰ- (to unite, assemble, keep).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈɡæðə/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈɡæðɚ/
  • Rhymes: -æðə(ɹ)

Verb

gather (third-person singular simple present gathers, present participle gathering, simple past and past participle gathered)

  1. To collect; normally separate things.
    1. Especially, to harvest food.
    2. To accumulate over time, to amass little by little.
    3. (intransitive) To congregate, or assemble.
      • ?, Alfred Tennyson, Tears
        Tears from the depth of some divine despair / Rise in the heart, and gather to the eyes.
    4. (intransitive) To grow gradually larger by accretion.
      • Their snow-ball did not gather as it went.
  2. To bring parts of a whole closer.
    1. (sewing) To add pleats or folds to a piece of cloth, normally to reduce its width.
    2. (knitting) To bring stitches closer together.
    3. (architecture) To bring together, or nearer together, in masonry, as for example where the width of a fireplace is rapidly diminished to the width of the flue.
    4. (nautical) To haul in; to take up.
  3. To infer or conclude; to know from a different source.
  4. (intransitive, medicine, of a boil or sore) To be filled with pus
  5. (glassblowing) To collect molten glass on the end of a tool.
  6. To gain; to win.

Synonyms

  • (to bring together): aggroup, togetherize; see also Thesaurus:round up
    (—to accumulate over time): accrue, add up; see also Thesaurus:accumulate
    (—to congregate): assemble, begather; see also Thesaurus:assemble

Derived terms

Translations

Noun

gather (plural gathers)

  1. A plait or fold in cloth, made by drawing a thread through it; a pucker.
  2. The inclination forward of the axle journals to keep the wheels from working outward.
  3. The soffit or under surface of the masonry required in gathering. See gather (transitive verb).
  4. (glassblowing) A blob of molten glass collected on the end of a blowpipe.
  5. A gathering.
    • 2007, John Barnes, The Sky So Big and Black (Tor Books, →ISBN):
      “I’ll tell you all about it at the Gather, win or lose.”
    • 2014, Paul Lederer, Dark Angel Riding (Open Road Media, →ISBN):
      What bothered him more, he thought as he started Washoe southward, was Spikes’s animosity, the bearded man’s sudden violent reaction to his arrival at the gather.

Derived terms

  • gathering iron

Translations

Anagrams

  • Gareth, rageth


English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /tʌk/
  • Rhymes: -ʌk

Etymology 1

From Middle English tuken, touken (to torment, to stretch (cloth)), from Old English tūcian (to torment, vex) and Middle Dutch tucken (to tuck), both from Proto-Germanic *teuh-, *teug- (to draw, pull) (compare also *tukkōną), from Proto-Indo-European *dewk- (to pull). Akin to Old High German zucchen (to snatch, tug), zuchôn (to jerk), Old English tēon (to draw, pull, train). Doublet of touch.

Verb

tuck (third-person singular simple present tucks, present participle tucking, simple past and past participle tucked)

  1. (transitive) To pull or gather up (an item of fabric). [From 14thc.]
  2. (transitive) To push into a snug position; to place somewhere safe or somewhat hidden. [From 1580s.]
  3. (intransitive, often with “in” or “into”) To eat; to consume. [From 1780s.]
  4. (ergative) To fit neatly.
  5. To curl into a ball; to fold up and hold one’s legs.
  6. To sew folds; to make a tuck or tucks in.
  7. To full, as cloth.
  8. (LGBT, of a drag queen, trans woman, etc.) To conceal one’s penis and testicles, as with a gaff or by fastening them down with adhesive tape.
  9. (when playing scales on piano keys) To keep the thumb in position while moving the rest of the hand over it to continue playing keys that are outside the thumb.
  10. (aviation) Ellipsis of Mach tuck.
Antonyms
  • untuck
Derived terms
Translations

Noun

tuck (plural tucks)

  1. An act of tucking; a pleat or fold. [From late 14thC.]
  2. (sewing) A fold in fabric that has been stitched in place from end to end, as to reduce the overall dimension of the fabric piece.
  3. A curled position.
  4. (medicine, surgery) A plastic surgery technique to remove excess skin.
  5. (music, piano, when playing scales on piano keys) The act of keeping the thumb in position while moving the rest of the hand over it to continue playing keys that are outside the thumb.
  6. (diving) A curled position, with the shins held towards the body.
  7. (nautical) The afterpart of a ship, immediately under the stern or counter, where the ends of the bottom planks are collected and terminate by the tuck-rail.
Related terms
  • tucker
Translations

Etymology 2

From Old French estoc (rapier), from Italian stocco (a truncheon, a short sword)

Noun

tuck (plural tucks)

  1. (archaic) A rapier, a sword.
    • 1663, Hudibras, by Samuel Butler, part 1, canto 2
      […] with force he labour’d / To free’s blade from retentive scabbard; / And after many a painful pluck, / From rusty durance he bail’d tuck […]
    • 1601, Twelfth Night by William Shakespeare, Act III, Scene I.
      […] dismount thy tuck, be yare in thy preparation, for thy assailant is quick, skilful, and deadly. […]
Translations

Etymology 3

Compare tocsin.

Noun

tuck (plural tucks)

  1. The beat of a drum.

Etymology 4

Old Occitan tuc (uncooked).

Noun

tuck (uncountable)

  1. (Britain, dated, school slang) Food, especially snack food.
Derived terms
  • tuck shop
  • tuck box
  • tuck in

Manx

Verb

tuck (verbal noun tuckal, past participle tuckit)

  1. to full (cloth)

Synonyms

  • walk
  • giallee

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