gaud vs gewgaw what difference

what is difference between gaud and gewgaw

English

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡɔːd/
  • Homophones: god (in accents with the cot-caught merger), gored (in non-rhotic accents with the horse-hoarse merger)

Etymology 1

From Middle English gaude, gawde (jest, prank, trick; ornamental bead in a rosary, trinket, bauble). Compare Middle English gaudy, gaudee, of the same meaning.

Noun

gaud (plural gauds)

  1. a cheap showy trinket
    • 1922, T. E. Lawrence, Seven Pillars of Wisdom (published 1926)
      Dalmeny lent me red tabs, Evans his brass hat; so that I had the gauds of my appointment in the ceremony of the Jaffa gate, which for me was the supreme moment of the war.
  2. (obsolete) trick; jest; sport
  3. (obsolete) deceit; fraud; artifice

Translations

Related terms
  • gaudy

Verb

gaud (third-person singular simple present gauds, present participle gauding, simple past and past participle gauded)

  1. (obsolete) To bedeck gaudily; to decorate with gauds or showy trinkets or colours; to paint.

Etymology 2

Compare French gaudir (to rejoice).

Verb

gaud (third-person singular simple present gauds, present participle gauding, simple past and past participle gauded)

  1. To sport or keep festival.
    • 1579, Thomas North, The Lives of the Noble Grecians and Romanes
      gauding with his familiars

Anagrams

  • Dagu, Guad.

Ilocano

Noun

gaud

  1. paddle; oar

Lubuagan Kalinga

Noun

gaud

  1. paddle; oar


English

Alternative forms

  • geegaw
  • gew-gaw

Etymology

From earlier gugaw, gygaw, from Middle English givegove (gewgaw, trifle), a reduplication of Middle English give, geove (gift), from Old English giefu, geofu, geafu (gift), from Proto-Germanic *gebō (gift). Compare Icelandic gyligjöf (showy gifts, gewgaw). More at give.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈɡjuːɡɔː/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈɡuɡɔ/
    • (US) (cot-caught merger)

Noun

gewgaw (plural gewgaws)

  1. A showy trifle, a toy; a showy trinket, ornament or decoration. [from 15th c.]
    • A heavy gewgaw called a crown.
    • 1951, Isaac Asimov, Foundation (1974 Panther Books Ltd publication), part V: “The Merchant Princes”, chapter 11, page 163, ¶¶ 2–4:
      “I am not of the neighbourhood,” said Mallow, calmly, “but the matter is irrelevant. I have had the honour to send you a little gift yesterday ——” [¶] The tech-man’s nose lifted. “I received it. An interesting gewgaw. I may have use for it on occasion.” [¶] I have other and more interesting gifts. Quite out of the gewgaw stage.”
    • 2011, Will Self, “The frowniest spot on Earth”, London Review of Books, XXXIII.9:
      You or I may well view our desire to push buttons and order new electronic gewgaws as the mere reflex spasms of consumerism, but to this dynamic duo the future of the earth depends on our instant gratification more than anything else.

Translations

Adjective

gewgaw (not comparable)

  1. Showy; unreal; pretentious.
    • 1678, Dryden, John, All for Love, Scene II,
      The rattle of a globe to play withal,
      This gewgaw world, and put him cheaply off;
    • 1855, Alfred, Lord Tennyson, Maud; A Monodrama, X, stanza 1,
      Seeing his gewgaw castle shine,
      New as his title, built last year.

Synonyms

  • gewgawish

Derived terms

  • Jew’s harp (possibly)

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