gaudy vs loud what difference

what is difference between gaudy and loud

English

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈɡɔː.di/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈɡɔ.di/
    • (cotcaught merger) IPA(key): /ˈɡɑ.di/
  • Rhymes: -ɔːdi

Etymology 1

Origin uncertain; perhaps from gaud (ornament, trinket) +‎ -y, perhaps ultimately from Old French gaudir (to rejoice).

Alternatively, from Middle English gaudi, gawdy (yellowish), from Old French gaude, galde (weld (the plant)), from Frankish *walda, from Proto-Germanic *walþō, *walþijō, akin to Old English *weald, *wielde (>Middle English welde, wolde and Anglo-Latin walda (alum)), Middle Low German wolde, Middle Dutch woude. More at English weld.

A common claim that the word derives from Antoni Gaudí, designer of Barcelona’s Sagrada Família Basilica, is incorrect: the word was in use centuries before Gaudí was born.

Adjective

gaudy (comparative gaudier, superlative gaudiest)

  1. very showy or ornamented, now especially when excessive, or in a tasteless or vulgar manner
    • 1813, Jane Austen, Pride and Prejudice
      The rooms were lofty and handsome, and their furniture suitable to the fortune of its proprietor; but Elizabeth saw, with admiration of his taste, that it was neither gaudy nor uselessly fine; with less of splendour, and more real elegance, than the furniture of Rosings.
    • 2005, Thomas Hauser & Marilyn Cole Lownes, “How Bling-bling Took Over the Ring”, The Observer, 9 January 2005
      Gaudy jewellery might offend some people’s sense of style. But former heavyweight champion and grilling-machine entrepreneur George Foreman is philosophical about today’s craze for bling-bling.
  2. (obsolete) fun; merry; festive
    • And for my strange petition I will make
      Amends hereafter by some gaudy day
    • And then, there he was, slim and handsome, and dressed the gaudiest and prettiest you ever saw…
Synonyms
  • (excessively showy): tawdry, flashy, garish, kitschy
  • Thesaurus:gaudy
Derived terms
  • gaudily
  • gaudy night
Translations

Noun

gaudy (plural gaudies)

  1. One of the large beads in the rosary at which the paternoster is recited.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Gower to this entry?)

Etymology 2

Latin gaudium (joy). Doublet of joy.

Noun

gaudy (plural gaudies)

  1. A reunion held by one of the colleges of the University of Oxford for alumni, normally held during the summer vacations.


English

Alternative forms

  • lowd (obsolete)

Pronunciation

  • enPR: loud, IPA(key): /laʊd/
  • Rhymes: -aʊd

Etymology 1

From Middle English loude, loud, lud, from Old English hlūd (loud, noisy, sounding, sonorous), from Proto-West Germanic *hlūd, from Proto-Germanic *hlūdaz, *hlūþaz (heard), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱlewtos (heard, famous), from Proto-Indo-European *ḱlew- (to hear). More at listen.

Adjective

loud (comparative louder, superlative loudest)

  1. (of a sound) Of great intensity.
  2. (of a person, thing, event, etc.) Noisy.
    • 1611, Bible (King James Version), Proverbs vii. 11
      She is loud and stubborn.
  3. (of a person, event, etc.) Not subtle or reserved, brash.
  4. (of clothing, decorations, etc.) Having unpleasantly and tastelessly contrasting colours or patterns; gaudy.
  5. (of marijuana, slang) High-quality; premium; (by extension) having a strong or pungent odour indicating good quality
Synonyms
  • (of clothing, etc): garish, gaudy
Antonyms
  • (sound): quiet, soft
  • (person): quiet
Derived terms
Translations

Noun

loud (countable and uncountable, plural louds)

  1. (colloquial) A loud sound or part of a sound.
    • 2012, Sam McGuire, Paul Lee, The Video Editor’s Guide to Soundtrack Pro (page 103)
      The expander doesn’t really make the louds louder and the softs softer in one step []
  2. (slang, uncountable) High-quality marijuana.
See also
  • dank

Etymology 2

From Middle English loude, from Old English hlūde (loudly), from Proto-Germanic *hlūda, *hlūdô (loudly), related to Etymology 1.

Adverb

loud (comparative louder, superlative loudest)

  1. Loudly.
    • c. 1597, William Shakespeare, Henry IV, Part 2, Act II, Scene 4,[1]
      Who knocks so loud at door?
    • 1749, Henry Fielding, The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling, Dublin: John Smith, Volume 2, Book 7, Chapter 14, pp. 71-72,[2]
      Unluckily that worthy Officer having, in a literal Sense, taken his Fill of Liquor, had been some Time retired to his Bolster, where he was snoaring so loud, that it was not easy to convey a Noise in at his Ears capable of drowning that which issued from his Nostrils.

Anagrams

  • Ludo, ludo, ludo-, ould

Middle English

Etymology 1

From Old English hlūd.

Adjective

loud

  1. Alternative form of loude (loud)

Etymology 2

From Old English hlūde.

Adverb

loud

  1. Alternative form of loude (loudly)

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial