gaze vs regard what difference

what is difference between gaze and regard

English

Etymology

Akin to Swedish dialectal gasa and Gothic ???????????????????????????????? (usgasjan, to terrify).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡeɪz/
  • Rhymes: -eɪz
  • Homophone: gays

Verb

gaze (third-person singular simple present gazes, present participle gazing, simple past and past participle gazed)

  1. (intransitive) To stare intently or earnestly.
    • 1922, James Joyce, Ulysses Chapter 13
      Gerty MacDowell who was seated near her companions, lost in thought, gazing far away into the distance was, in very truth, as fair a specimen of winsome Irish girlhood as one could wish to see.
    They gazed at the stars for hours.
    In fact, for Antonioni this gazing is probably the most fundamental of all cognitive activities … (from Thinking in the Absence of Image)
    • Why stand ye gazing up into heaven?
  2. (transitive, poetic) To stare at.

Synonyms

  • gape, stare, look

Troponyms

  • (to stare intently): ogle

Derived terms

  • at gaze
  • begaze
  • foregaze
  • gazer

Translations

Noun

gaze (plural gazes)

  1. A fixed look; a look of eagerness, wonder, or admiration; a continued look of attention.
  2. (archaic) The object gazed on.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Edmund Spenser to this entry?)
  3. (psychoanalysis) In Lacanian psychoanalysis, the relationship of the subject with the desire to look and awareness that one can be viewed.
    • 2003, Amelia Jones, The feminism and visual culture reader, p.35:
      She counters the tendency to focus on critical strategies of resisting the male gaze, raising the issue of the female spectator.

Derived terms

  • foregaze
  • male gaze
  • white gaze

Translations

References


French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡɑz/
  • Homophones: gaz, gazes, gazent

Etymology 1

From Arabic قَزّ(qazz, silk) (pronounced in the dialects with /ɡ/), less likely from غَزَّة(ḡazza, Gaza), a city associated with silk production.

Noun

gaze f (plural gazes)

  1. gauze

Etymology 2

Verb

gaze

  1. first-person singular present indicative of gazer
  2. third-person singular present indicative of gazer
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of gazer
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of gazer
  5. second-person singular imperative of gazer

Further reading

  • “gaze” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Portuguese

Pronunciation

  • Hyphenation: ga‧ze
  • Rhymes: -azi, -azɨ

Noun

gaze f (plural gazes)

  1. gauze (thin fabric with open weave)
  2. gauze (cotton fabric used as surgical dressing)

Romanian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈɡaze]

Noun

gaze n

  1. indefinite plural of gaz


English

Alternative forms

  • regarde, reguard, reguarde (all obsolete)

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ɹɪˈɡɑːd/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ɹɪˈɡɑɹd/
  • Hyphenation: re‧gard
  • Rhymes: -ɑː(ɹ)d

Etymology 1

From Middle English regard, regarde, reguard, from Anglo-Norman reguard, from regarder, reguarder. Attested in Middle English starting around the mid 14th century. Compare guard, reward, guardian, and so on.

Noun

regard (countable and uncountable, plural regards)

  1. (countable) A steady look, a gaze. [from 15th c.]
    • 1982, Lawrence Durrell, Constance, Faber & Faber 2004 (Avignon Quintet), p. 750:
      He bathed in the memory of her blondness, of her warm blue regard, and the sentiment permeated his sensibility with tenderness made the more rich because its object was someone long since dead.
  2. One’s concern for another; esteem; relation, reference. [from 16th c.]
  3. (preceded by “in” or “with”) A particular aspect or detail; respect, sense. [from 16th c.]
    • 1842, Treuttel and Würtz, The Foreign Quarterly Review, page 144:
      This attempt will be made with every regard to the difficulty of the undertaking []
    • 1989, Leonard W. Poon, David C. Rubin, Barbara A. Wilson, Everyday Cognition in Adulthood and Late Life, Cambridge University Press, page 399:
      These problems were not traditional problems with realistic stimuli, but rather were realistic in every regard.
  4. (uncountable) The worth or estimation in which something or someone is held.
    Synonyms: esteem, repute
    He is held in great regard in Whitehall.
Derived terms
  • disregard
  • in regard
  • in regard of
  • in regard to
  • with regard to

Synonyms

  • consideration, onlook, respect

Antonyms

  • (concern for another): neglect

Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English regarden, from Old French regarder, reguarder. First attested in late Middle English, circa the early 15th century.

Verb

regard (third-person singular simple present regards, present participle regarding, simple past and past participle regarded)

  1. To look at; to observe. [from 16th c.]
  2. (transitive) To consider, look upon (something) in a given way etc. [from 16th c.]
    • , [Act V, scene iv]:
      Signior Leonato, truth it is good Signior, / Your neece regards me with an eye of fauour.
  3. (transitive, archaic) To take notice of, pay attention to. [from 16th c.]
  4. (transitive) To face toward.
  5. (transitive) To have to do with, to concern. [from 17th c.]
  6. (transitive, obsolete) To set store by (something), to hold (someone) in esteem; to consider to have value, to respect. [from 16th c.]
    • 1526, William Tyndale, trans. Bible, Luke 18:2:
      Ther was a Iudge in a certayne cite which feared not god nether regarded man.
Derived terms
  • regardable
  • regarder
  • regardless
  • self-regarding
Synonyms
  • (to look at): See Thesaurus:look
  • (to consider): See Thesaurus:deem
  • (to take notice of): See Thesaurus:pay attention
Antonyms
  • ignore
  • neglect

Translations

Anagrams

  • Drager, Gerard, Grader, grader, red rag, redrag

French

Etymology

From Middle French regard, from Old French regard, from reguarder.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ʁə.ɡaʁ/

Noun

regard m (plural regards)

  1. look, glance
  2. (uncountable) sight, gaze, eyes
    • 1885, Loreau, Heriette (trans.), L’Ami commun (Our Mutual Friend, Charles Dickens), Part IV, chapter 10:
  3. manhole

Derived terms

Related terms

  • regarder

Further reading

  • “regard” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • garder, Gérard

Old French

Alternative forms

  • regart, resgard, resgart, regarde

Noun

regard m (oblique plural regarz or regartz, nominative singular regarz or regartz, nominative plural regard)

  1. look; observance; watching (act, instance of looking at)

Descendants

  • Middle French: regard
    • Middle English: regard, regarde
      • English: regard

References

  • regard on the Anglo-Norman On-Line Hub

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