gaze vs stare what difference

what is difference between gaze and stare

English

Etymology

Akin to Swedish dialectal gasa and Gothic ???????????????????????????????? (usgasjan, to terrify).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡeɪz/
  • Rhymes: -eɪz
  • Homophone: gays

Verb

gaze (third-person singular simple present gazes, present participle gazing, simple past and past participle gazed)

  1. (intransitive) To stare intently or earnestly.
    • 1922, James Joyce, Ulysses Chapter 13
      Gerty MacDowell who was seated near her companions, lost in thought, gazing far away into the distance was, in very truth, as fair a specimen of winsome Irish girlhood as one could wish to see.
    They gazed at the stars for hours.
    In fact, for Antonioni this gazing is probably the most fundamental of all cognitive activities … (from Thinking in the Absence of Image)
    • Why stand ye gazing up into heaven?
  2. (transitive, poetic) To stare at.

Synonyms

  • gape, stare, look

Troponyms

  • (to stare intently): ogle

Derived terms

  • at gaze
  • begaze
  • foregaze
  • gazer

Translations

Noun

gaze (plural gazes)

  1. A fixed look; a look of eagerness, wonder, or admiration; a continued look of attention.
  2. (archaic) The object gazed on.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Edmund Spenser to this entry?)
  3. (psychoanalysis) In Lacanian psychoanalysis, the relationship of the subject with the desire to look and awareness that one can be viewed.
    • 2003, Amelia Jones, The feminism and visual culture reader, p.35:
      She counters the tendency to focus on critical strategies of resisting the male gaze, raising the issue of the female spectator.

Derived terms

  • foregaze
  • male gaze
  • white gaze

Translations

References


French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡɑz/
  • Homophones: gaz, gazes, gazent

Etymology 1

From Arabic قَزّ(qazz, silk) (pronounced in the dialects with /ɡ/), less likely from غَزَّة(ḡazza, Gaza), a city associated with silk production.

Noun

gaze f (plural gazes)

  1. gauze

Etymology 2

Verb

gaze

  1. first-person singular present indicative of gazer
  2. third-person singular present indicative of gazer
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of gazer
  4. third-person singular present subjunctive of gazer
  5. second-person singular imperative of gazer

Further reading

  • “gaze” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Portuguese

Pronunciation

  • Hyphenation: ga‧ze
  • Rhymes: -azi, -azɨ

Noun

gaze f (plural gazes)

  1. gauze (thin fabric with open weave)
  2. gauze (cotton fabric used as surgical dressing)

Romanian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ˈɡaze]

Noun

gaze n

  1. indefinite plural of gaz


English

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /stɛəɹ/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /stɛə(ɹ)/
  • Rhymes: -ɛə(ɹ)
  • Homophone: stair

Etymology 1

From Middle English staren, from Old English starian (to stare), from Proto-Germanic *starjaną, *starāną (to be fixed, be rigid), from Proto-Indo-European *ster-. Cognate with Dutch staren (to stare), German starren (to stare), Norwegian stare (to stare), German starr (stiff). More at start.

Verb

stare (third-person singular simple present stares, present participle staring, simple past and past participle stared)

  1. (intransitive, construed with at) To look fixedly (at something).
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:stare
    • A great bargain also had been the excellent Axminster carpet which covered the floor; as, again, the arm-chair in which Bunting now sat forward, staring into the dull, small fire. In fact, that arm-chair had been an extravagance of Mrs. Bunting. She had wanted her husband to be comfortable after the day’s work was done, and she had paid thirty-seven shillings for the chair.
  2. (transitive) To influence in some way by looking fixedly.
    to stare a timid person into submission
  3. (intransitive) To be very conspicuous on account of size, prominence, colour, or brilliancy.
  4. (intransitive, obsolete) To stand out; to project; to bristle.
    • 1707, John Mortimer, The whole Art of Husbandry, in the way of Managing and Improving of Land
      Take off all the staring straws, twigs and jags in the hive.
Troponyms
  • gaze, to stare intently or earnestly
  • ogle, to stare covetously or amorously
Derived terms
  • stare someone in the face
  • upstaring
Translations

Noun

stare (plural stares)

  1. A persistent gaze.
    the stares of astonished passers-by

Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English star, ster, from Old English stær (starling), from Proto-Germanic *starô (starling), from Proto-Indo-European *stor- (starling). Cognate with German Star (starling), Danish stær (starling), Swedish stare (starling), Norwegian Nynorsk stare (starling), Icelandic stari (starling). Compare also Old English stearn (a type of bird, starling).

Noun

stare (plural stares)

  1. (now archaic) A starling. [from 9th c.]
    • 1634, William Wood, New Englands Prospect, I:
      The Stares be bigger than thoſe in England, as blacke as Crowes, being the most troubleſome, and injurious bird of all others […].

Anagrams

  • ‘earts, -aster, Aters, Sater, Satre, TASer, Taser, Tesar, arets, arste, aster, earst, rates, reast, resat, setar, stear, tares, tarse, taser, tears, teras

Dutch

Pronunciation

Verb

stare

  1. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of staren

Anagrams

  • Aster

Italian

Etymology

From Latin stāre, present active infinitive of stō, from Proto-Indo-European *steh₂-. Cognate with Spanish estar and English state.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈsta.re/
  • Rhymes: -are

Verb

stàre (first-person singular present (with following syntactic gemination) stò, first-person singular past historic stètti or (popular) stièdi, past participle stàto, first-person singular future starò, first-person singular present subjunctive stìa, first-person singular imperfect subjunctive stéssi, second-person singular imperative stai or sta’ or (with following syntactic gemination) sta, auxiliary essere) (intransitive)

  1. to stay, remain
  2. to keep, stick [+ a (object)]
  3. (followed by a gerund) to be doing something (present continuous)
  4. to be up to [+ a (object)]
  5. to be about to [+ per (object)]
  6. (mathematics) to be to [+ a (object)]
  7. (regional) to live
  8. to be in a certain condition

Conjugation

Synonyms

  • (to stay): essere, restare, rimanere
  • (to remain): restare, rimanere
  • (to be): essere
  • (to live): vivere, abitare
  • (to keep, etc.): attenersi (a)
  • (to be up to): toccare (a), spettare (a)

Derived terms

Related terms

Anagrams

  • -astre, Tresa, estra-, resta, sarte, tersa

Latin

Verb

stāre

  1. present active infinitive of stō

Lower Sorbian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈstarɛ/, [ˈstarə]

Adjective

stare

  1. inflection of stary:
    1. neuter nominative/accusative singular
    2. nominative/accusative plural

Norwegian Nynorsk

Alternative forms

  • star

Etymology

From Old Norse stari.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /²stɑːrə/

Noun

stare m (definite singular staren, indefinite plural starar, definite plural starane)

  1. a starling (a songbird, Sturnus vulgaris)

See also

  • stær (Bokmål)

References

  • “stare” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Polish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈsta.rɛ/

Adjective

stare

  1. inflection of stary:
    1. neuter nominative/accusative/vocative singular
    2. nonvirile nominative/accusative/vocative plural

Romanian

Etymology

From the verb sta.

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -are

Noun

stare f (plural stări)

  1. status, standing, situation, position, condition
  2. state

Derived terms

  • în stare

See also

  • stat

Serbo-Croatian

Adjective

stare

  1. inflection of star:
    1. masculine accusative plural
    2. feminine genitive singular
    3. feminine nominative/accusative/vocative plural

Swedish

Noun

stare c

  1. starling (a bird)

Declension

Anagrams

  • arets, etsar, raset, reats, retas, treas

Tarantino

Etymology

From Latin stāre, present active infinitive of stō, from Proto-Indo-European *steh₂-.

Verb

stare

  1. (intransitive) to stay, remain
  2. (intransitive) to be

Conjugation

  • Full conjugation needed.
  • Present tense:- stoche, sté or stéje, sté or stéje, stáme, státe, stonne

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