gear vs geartrain what difference

what is difference between gear and geartrain

English

Etymology

From Middle English gere, a borrowing from Old Norse gervi, from Proto-Germanic *garwijaną (to prepare). See also adjective yare, yar from the same root via Old English.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) enPR: gîr, IPA(key): /ɡɪə(ɹ)/
  • (US) enPR: gîr, IPA(key): /ɡɪɚ/
  • Rhymes: -ɪə(r)

Noun

gear (countable and uncountable, plural gears)

  1. (uncountable) Equipment or paraphernalia, especially that used for an athletic endeavor.
  2. Clothing; garments.
  3. (obsolete) Goods; property; household items.
    • 1551, Ralph Robinson (sometimes spelt Raphe Robynson) (translator), Utopia (originally written by Sir Thomas More)
  4. (countable) A wheel with grooves (teeth) engraved on the outer circumference, such that two such devices can interlock and convey motion from one to the other; a gear wheel.
    Synonyms: cog, cogwheel, gearwheel
  5. (countable, automotive, cycling) A particular combination or choice of interlocking gears, such that a particular gear ratio is achieved.
  6. (countable, automotive) A configuration of the transmission of a motor car so as to achieve a particular ratio of engine to axle torque.
  7. (aviation) Ellipsis of landing gear.
  8. (slang) Recreational drugs, including steroids.
    • 2003, Marianne Hancock, Looking for Oliver (page 90)
  9. (uncountable, archaic) Stuff.
    • 1662, Henry More, An Antidote Against Atheism, Book III, A Collection of Several Philosophical Writings of Dr. Henry More, p. 113:
  10. (obsolete) Business matters; affairs; concern.
  11. (obsolete, Britain, dialect) Anything worthless; nonsense; rubbish.
    • (Can we find and add a quotation of Wright to this entry?)
    • March 29, 1549, Hugh Latimer, the fourth sermon preached before King Edward

Derived terms

Translations

Verb

gear (third-person singular simple present gears, present participle gearing, simple past and past participle geared)

  1. (engineering, transitive) To provide with gearing; to fit with gears in order to achieve a desired gear ratio.
  2. (engineering, intransitive) To be in, or come into, gear.
  3. To dress; to put gear on; to harness.
  4. (usually with to or toward(s)) To design or devise (something) so as to be suitable (for a particular type of person or a particular purpose).
    This shop is not really geared towards people of our age.
    They have geared the hotel mainly at tourists.
  5. (finance) To borrow money in order to invest it in assets.

Derived terms

Translations

Adjective

gear (comparative more gear, superlative most gear)

  1. (chiefly Liverpudlian) great or fantastic

Anagrams

  • Ager, GRAE, Gera, Rega, ager, areg, gare, rage

Manx

Alternative forms

  • geayr, geyre

Etymology

From Old Irish gér.

Verb

gear (verbal noun gearey)

  1. to laugh, chuckle

Adjective

gear

  1. sharp, keen
  2. sour, acid

Further reading

  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “gér”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language

Old English

Alternative forms

  • ġǣr, ġērAnglian

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *jērą, from Proto-Indo-European *yeh₁r-. Cognate with Old Frisian jēr (West Frisian jier), Old Saxon jār (Middle Low German jâr), Dutch jaar, Old High German jār (German Jahr), Old Norse ár (Danish/Norwegian/Swedish år, Icelandic/Faroese ár), Gothic ???????????? (jēr). The Indo-European root is also the source of Ancient Greek ὥρα (hṓra, season), Russian яра (jara), Czech jaro, Lithuanian jore (springtime).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /jæ͜ɑːr/

Noun

ġēar n (nominative plural ġēar)

  1. year
  2. the runic character (/j/)

Declension

Derived terms

  • ġēardagas
  • ġēarlīċ
  • ġeāra (uncertain)

Descendants

  • Middle English: yeer, here, yere, ȝere
    • English: year
    • Scots: year

Portuguese

Etymology

From an Old Portuguese *gear (compare geo), from Latin gelāre, present active infinitive of gelō. Doublet of the borrowing gelar. Compare also Galician xear.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): [ʒeˈa(ɾ)]

Verb

gear (first-person singular present indicative geio, past participle geado)

  1. (impersonal) to frost (weather)

Conjugation

Related terms


West Frisian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡɪə̯r/

Adverb

gear

  1. together

Further reading

  • “gear (III)”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011


English

Noun

geartrain (plural geartrains)

  1. Alternative form of gear train

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial