gelid vs polar what difference

what is difference between gelid and polar

English

Etymology

First attested in 1630. From Latin gelidus (cold), from gelu (frost).

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation, US) IPA(key): /ˈdʒɛl.ɪd/

Adjective

gelid (comparative more gelid, superlative most gelid)

  1. Very cold; icy or frosty.
    • 1837 Thomas Carlyle, The French Revolution: A History
      Of Cassandra-Marat we have spoken often; yet the most surprising truth remains to be spoken: that he actually does not want sense; but, with croaking gelid throat, croaks out masses of the truth, on several things.
    • 1898, Florence Earle Coates, Siberia
      Above the gelid source of mountain springs,
      ⁠A solitary eagle, circling, flies.
    • 2005, Robert Jordan, Knife of Dreams:
      In the worst of summer the tower remained cool, yet the air seemed feverish and gelid when sisters of different Ajahs came too close.

Derived terms

  • gelidity / gelidness
  • gelidly

Related terms

Translations

Anagrams

  • Glide, glide, lidge, liged

Dutch

Etymology

From ge- +‎ lid.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɣəˈlɪt/
  • Hyphenation: ge‧lid
  • Rhymes: -ɪt

Noun

gelid n (plural gelederen)

  1. row of a formation, battle line
  2. an organizational rank, especially a military rank

Descendants

  • Afrikaans: gelid

Noun

gelid n (plural geleden)

  1. a joint, a point of articulation

Anagrams

  • gilde, ledig

Old Irish

Etymology

From Proto-Celtic *gʷeleti (to graze), of uncertain origin; perhaps from Proto-Indo-European *gʷlew-, extension from *gʷel- (throat), which could be imitative. See also Old English ceole, German Kehle, Proto-Slavic *glъtati (to devour).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡʲe.lʲəð/

Verb

gelid (conjunct ·geil, verbal noun gelt)

  1. to graze, consume
    • c. 700, De Origine Scoticae Linguae from the Yellow Book of Lecan, O’Mulc. 830
    • c. 800, Immacaldam Choluim Cille ⁊ ind óclaig, published in “The Lough Foyle Colloquy Texts: Immacaldam Choluim Chille 7 ind Óclaig oc Carraic Eolairg and Immacaldam in Druad Brain 7 Inna Banḟátho Febuil Ós Loch Ḟebuil”, Ériu 52 (2002), pp. 53-87, edited and with translations by John Carey,
    • c. 800–825, Diarmait, Milan Glosses on the Psalms, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1987, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. I, pp. 7–483, Ml. 80a11
    • c. 845, St. Gall Glosses on Priscian, published in Thesaurus Palaeohibernicus (reprinted 1975, Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies), edited and with translations by Whitley Stokes and John Strachan, vol. II, pp. 49–224, Sg. 143b1

Inflection

Derived terms

  • con·geil
  • fo·geil

References

Further reading

  • Gregory Toner, Maire Ní Mhaonaigh, Sharon Arbuthnot, Dagmar Wodtko, Maire-Luise Theuerkauf, editors (2019), “gelid”, in eDIL: Electronic Dictionary of the Irish Language


English

Etymology

From Late Latin polāris , equivalent to pole + -ar.

Pronunciation

  • (UK) IPA(key): /ˈpəʊ̯lə(ɹ)/, [ˈpʰəʊ̯lə(ɹ)]
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈpoʊ̯lɚ/, [ˈpʰoʊ̯lɚ]
  • Rhymes: -əʊlə(ɹ)

Adjective

polar (not comparable)

  1. Of or having a pole or polarity.
  2. (geography) Of, relating to, measured from, or referred to a geographic pole (the North Pole or South Pole); within the Arctic or Antarctic circles.
  3. (space sciences) Of an orbit that passes over, or near, one of these poles.
  4. (chemistry) Having a dipole; ionic.
  5. (mathematics) Of a coordinate system, specifying the location of a point in a plane by using a radius and an angle.
  6. (linguistics, of a question) Having but two possible answers, yes and no.

Derived terms

  • polar bear
  • polar nucleus
  • polar opposite

Translations

Noun

polar (plural polars)

  1. (geometry) The line joining the points of contact of tangents drawn to meet a curve from a point called the pole of the line.

Anagrams

  • ROLAP, parol, poral

Catalan

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic) IPA(key): /poˈla/
  • (Central) IPA(key): /puˈla/
  • (Valencian) IPA(key): /poˈlaɾ/

Adjective

polar (masculine and feminine plural polars)

  1. polar

Derived terms

  • ós polar

French

Etymology

From policier +‎ -ard.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /pɔ.laʁ/

Noun

polar m (plural polars)

  1. (informal) detective novel

Further reading

  • “polar” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Galician

Pronunciation

Adjective

polar m or f (plural polares)

  1. polar

Antonyms

  • apolar

German

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /poˈlaːɐ̯/

Adjective

polar (not comparable)

  1. polar

Declension

Derived terms

  • Polarmeer
  • Polarnacht

Further reading

  • “polar” in Duden online

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From the noun pol

Pronunciation

Adjective

polar (neuter singular polart, definite singular and plural polare)

  1. polar

Derived terms

  • polarisere
  • polarsirkel

References

  • “polar” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology 1

From the noun pol

Adjective

polar (neuter singular polart, definite singular and plural polare)

  1. polar
Derived terms
  • polarisere
  • polarsirkel

Etymology 2

Noun

polar m

  1. indefinite plural of pol

References

  • “polar” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Portuguese

Pronunciation

  • Homophone: pular (Portugal)
  • Hyphenation: po‧lar

Adjective

polar m or f (plural polares, comparable)

  1. polar

Derived terms

  • apolar
  • estrela polar
  • urso polar
  • polaridade

Related terms

  • polo

Romanian

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin polāris, Italian polare and French polaire.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /poˈlar/

Adjective

polar m or n (feminine singular polară, masculine plural polari, feminine and neuter plural polare)

  1. polar

Declension

Derived terms

  • urs polar

Spanish

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /poˈlaɾ/, [poˈlaɾ]
  • Hyphenation: po‧lar

Adjective

polar (plural polares)

  1. polar

Derived terms

  • apolar
  • casquete polar
  • estrella polar
  • oso polar
  • polaridad

Related terms

  • polo

Further reading

  • “polar” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.

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