gem vs muffin what difference

what is difference between gem and muffin

English

Etymology

From Middle English gemme, gimme, yimme, ȝimme, from Old English ġimm, from Proto-West Germanic *gimmu (gem) and Old French gemme (gem), both from Latin gemma (a swelling bud; jewel, gem).

Pronunciation

  • enPR: jĕm, IPA(key): /d͡ʒɛm/
    • (pinpen merger) IPA(key): /d͡ʒɪm/
  • Rhymes: -ɛm

Noun

gem (countable and uncountable, plural gems)

  1. A precious stone, usually of substantial monetary value or prized for its beauty or shine.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, London: William Ponsonbie, Book 1, Canto 10, p. 144,[1]
      And on her head she wore a tyre of gold,
      Adornd with gemmes and owches wondrous fayre,
      Whose passing price vneath was to be told;
    • c. 1602, William Shakespeare, All’s Well That Ends Well, Act V, Scene 3,[2]
      Of six preceding ancestors, that gem,
      Conferr’d by testament to the sequent issue,
      Hath it been owed and worn. This is his wife;
      That ring’s a thousand proofs.
    • 1667, John Milton, Paradise Lost, Book 4, lines 647-649,[3]
      [] then silent Night
      With this her solemn Bird and this fair Moon,
      And these the Gemms of Heav’n, her starrie train:
  2. (figuratively) Any precious or highly valued thing or person.
    She’s an absolute gem.
  3. Anything of small size, or expressed within brief limits, which is regarded as a gem on account of its beauty or value, such as a small picture, a verse of poetry, or an epigram.
    a gem of wit
  4. (obsolete) A gemma or leaf-bud.
    • c. 1668, John Denham (translator), Of Old Age by Cato the Elder, Part 3, in Poems and Translations, with The Sophy, London: H. Herringman, 4th edition, 1773, p. 35,[6]
      Then from the Joynts of thy prolifick Stemm
      A swelling Knot is raised (call’d a Gemm)
    • 1803, John Browne Cutting, “A Succinct History of Jamaica” in Robert Charles Dallas, The History of the Maroons, London: Longman and Rees, Volume 1, p. xcii,[7]
      In about twelve days the sprouts from the gems of the planted cane are seen []
  5. A type of geometrid moth, Orthonama obstipata.
  6. (computing) A package containing programs or libraries for the Ruby programming language.
  7. (uncountable, printing, uncommon, obsolete) A size of type between brilliant (4-point) and diamond (4½-point), running 222 lines to the foot.

Synonyms

  • (precious stone): gemstone, jewel, precious stone; see also Thesaurus:gemstone

Derived terms

  • begem
  • Gem County
  • Gem State

Translations

Verb

gem (third-person singular simple present gems, present participle gemming, simple past and past participle gemmed)

  1. (transitive) To adorn with, or as if with, gems.

Synonyms

  • begem

See also

  • Wikipedia article on Gemstones

Anagrams

  • EGM, EMG, MEG, MGE, Meg, meg, meg-

Albanian

Alternative forms

  • gemb

Etymology

Together with gemb, a phonetic variant of gjemb.

Noun

gem m

  1. branch

Derived terms

  • gemtë

Related terms

  • gjemb

References


Cimbrian

Alternative forms

  • ghèban (Sette Comuni)

Etymology

From Middle High German geben, from Old High German geban, from Proto-West Germanic *geban, from Proto-Germanic *gebaną.

Cognate with German geben, Dutch geven, obsolete English yive, Icelandic gefa.

Verb

gem (strong class 5, auxiliary håm)

  1. (Luserna) to give

References

  • “gem” in Patuzzi, Umberto, ed., (2013) Ünsarne Börtar [Our Words], Luserna, Italy: Comitato unitario delle isole linguistiche storiche germaniche in Italia / Einheitskomitee der historischen deutschen Sprachinseln in Italien

Danish

Verb

gem

  1. imperative of gemme

Meriam

Noun

gem

  1. body

Polish

Etymology

From English game, from Middle English game, gamen, gammen, from Old English gamen (sport, joy, mirth, pastime, game, amusement, pleasure), from Proto-West Germanic *gaman, from Proto-Germanic *gamaną (amusement, pleasure, game), from *ga- (collective prefix) + *mann- (man); or alternatively from *ga- + a root from Proto-Indo-European *men- (to think, have in mind).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡɛm/

Noun

gem m inan

  1. (tennis) game (part of a set)

Declension

Further reading

  • gem in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • gem in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Romanian

Etymology 1

From English jam.

Noun

gem n (plural gemuri)

  1. jam (sweet mixture of fruit boiled with sugar)
Declension

Etymology 2

Verb

gem

  1. first-person singular present indicative of geme
  2. first-person singular present subjunctive of geme
  3. third-person plural present indicative of geme

Swedish

Etymology 1

The paper clip’s most common design was originally thought to be made by The Gem Manufacturing Company in Britain in the 1870s. More at paper clip.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡeːm/, /jeːm/

Noun

gem n

  1. a paper clip

Etymology 2

From English game

Noun

gem n

  1. (tennis) a game; part of a set

Declension

References

  • gem in Svenska Akademiens ordlista (SAOL)
  • gem in Svenska Akademiens ordbok (SAOB)

Volapük

Etymology

Perhaps borrowed from French germain.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡem/, [ɡem]

Noun

gem (nominative plural gems)

  1. sibling
    • 1949, “Lifajenäd brefik cifala: ‚Jakob Sprenger‛”, in Volapükagased pro Nedänapükans, issue 4, 13-14.
      ‚Jakob‛ äbinom cil mälid se gems vel: blods lul e sörs tel.

      Jakob was the sixth child out of seven siblings: five brothers and two sisters.

Declension

Hyponyms

  • blod (brother)
  • higem (brother)
  • jiblod (sister)
  • jigem (sister)
  • sör (sister)

Derived terms

  • (collective) gemef (brother(s) and/or sister(s))
  • (adjective) gemik (sibling)


English

Etymology

From earlier moofin, of uncertain origin. Likely from Low German muffen, plural or possibly a diminutive of Low German muffe (small cake), from Middle Low German muffe (small pastry).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈmʌfɪn/
  • Rhymes: -ʌfɪn

Noun

muffin (plural muffins)

  1. (Britain) A type of flattish bun, usually cut in two horizontally, toasted and spread with butter, etc, before being eaten; an English muffin.
  2. A cupcake-shaped baked good (for example of cornbread, banana bread, or a chocolate dough), sometimes glazed but typically without frosting, eaten especially for breakfast (in contrast to a cupcake, which is a dessert).
    • For quotations using this term, see Citations:muffin.
  3. (computing) A mechanism used in the Java Network Launching Protocol analogous to the cookie mechanism and which permits a program running in a browser to perform operations on a client machine.
    • 2001, JNLP and Java Web Start, Sun Developer Network, Technical Articles and Tips, 30 May 2001:
      The name/value pairs provided by the PersistenceService are similar to browser cookies. The Java Web Start implementation honors this legacy by naming the pairs “muffins.
  4. (slang) Term of endearment.
    I love you, muffin!
  5. (vulga, sexual slang) Female pubic hair; female genitals (vulva, vagina), like muff. See Thesaurus:vagina.
  6. (baseball, slang) A less talented player; one who muffs, or drops the ball.
  7. (slang) A charming, attractive young man. (Can we add an example for this sense?)
  8. (dated) A small plate, smaller than a twiffler.

Synonyms

  • (flattish bun): English muffin (US)

Derived terms

See also

  • (term of endearment, small bread): cupcake

Descendants

  • Norwegian Bokmål: muffins

Translations

References

  • muffin at OneLook Dictionary Search

Danish

Etymology

From English muffin.

Noun

muffin c (singular definite muffinen, plural indefinite muffins)

  1. muffin (cake)

Declension


French

Etymology

From English muffin.

Pronunciation

  • (France) IPA(key): /mœ.fin/
  • (Quebec) IPA(key): /mɔ.fin/, /mɔ.fœn/

Noun

muffin m (plural muffins)

  1. muffin

Further reading

  • “muffin” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Polish

Alternative forms

  • muffinka
  • muffinek

Etymology

From English muffin.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): //ˈma.fʲin//

Noun

muffin m anim

  1. muffin (cake)

Declension

Further reading

  • muffin in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • muffin in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Portuguese

Etymology

From English muffin.

Noun

muffin m (plural muffins)

  1. muffin (type of small cake)
    Synonyms: queque, bolo inglês

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