gem vs stone what difference

what is difference between gem and stone

English

Etymology

From Middle English gemme, gimme, yimme, ȝimme, from Old English ġimm, from Proto-West Germanic *gimmu (gem) and Old French gemme (gem), both from Latin gemma (a swelling bud; jewel, gem).

Pronunciation

  • enPR: jĕm, IPA(key): /d͡ʒɛm/
    • (pinpen merger) IPA(key): /d͡ʒɪm/
  • Rhymes: -ɛm

Noun

gem (countable and uncountable, plural gems)

  1. A precious stone, usually of substantial monetary value or prized for its beauty or shine.
    • 1590, Edmund Spenser, The Faerie Queene, London: William Ponsonbie, Book 1, Canto 10, p. 144,[1]
      And on her head she wore a tyre of gold,
      Adornd with gemmes and owches wondrous fayre,
      Whose passing price vneath was to be told;
    • c. 1602, William Shakespeare, All’s Well That Ends Well, Act V, Scene 3,[2]
      Of six preceding ancestors, that gem,
      Conferr’d by testament to the sequent issue,
      Hath it been owed and worn. This is his wife;
      That ring’s a thousand proofs.
    • 1667, John Milton, Paradise Lost, Book 4, lines 647-649,[3]
      [] then silent Night
      With this her solemn Bird and this fair Moon,
      And these the Gemms of Heav’n, her starrie train:
  2. (figuratively) Any precious or highly valued thing or person.
    She’s an absolute gem.
  3. Anything of small size, or expressed within brief limits, which is regarded as a gem on account of its beauty or value, such as a small picture, a verse of poetry, or an epigram.
    a gem of wit
  4. (obsolete) A gemma or leaf-bud.
    • c. 1668, John Denham (translator), Of Old Age by Cato the Elder, Part 3, in Poems and Translations, with The Sophy, London: H. Herringman, 4th edition, 1773, p. 35,[6]
      Then from the Joynts of thy prolifick Stemm
      A swelling Knot is raised (call’d a Gemm)
    • 1803, John Browne Cutting, “A Succinct History of Jamaica” in Robert Charles Dallas, The History of the Maroons, London: Longman and Rees, Volume 1, p. xcii,[7]
      In about twelve days the sprouts from the gems of the planted cane are seen []
  5. A type of geometrid moth, Orthonama obstipata.
  6. (computing) A package containing programs or libraries for the Ruby programming language.
  7. (uncountable, printing, uncommon, obsolete) A size of type between brilliant (4-point) and diamond (4½-point), running 222 lines to the foot.

Synonyms

  • (precious stone): gemstone, jewel, precious stone; see also Thesaurus:gemstone

Derived terms

  • begem
  • Gem County
  • Gem State

Translations

Verb

gem (third-person singular simple present gems, present participle gemming, simple past and past participle gemmed)

  1. (transitive) To adorn with, or as if with, gems.

Synonyms

  • begem

See also

  • Wikipedia article on Gemstones

Anagrams

  • EGM, EMG, MEG, MGE, Meg, meg, meg-

Albanian

Alternative forms

  • gemb

Etymology

Together with gemb, a phonetic variant of gjemb.

Noun

gem m

  1. branch

Derived terms

  • gemtë

Related terms

  • gjemb

References


Cimbrian

Alternative forms

  • ghèban (Sette Comuni)

Etymology

From Middle High German geben, from Old High German geban, from Proto-West Germanic *geban, from Proto-Germanic *gebaną.

Cognate with German geben, Dutch geven, obsolete English yive, Icelandic gefa.

Verb

gem (strong class 5, auxiliary håm)

  1. (Luserna) to give

References

  • “gem” in Patuzzi, Umberto, ed., (2013) Ünsarne Börtar [Our Words], Luserna, Italy: Comitato unitario delle isole linguistiche storiche germaniche in Italia / Einheitskomitee der historischen deutschen Sprachinseln in Italien

Danish

Verb

gem

  1. imperative of gemme

Meriam

Noun

gem

  1. body

Polish

Etymology

From English game, from Middle English game, gamen, gammen, from Old English gamen (sport, joy, mirth, pastime, game, amusement, pleasure), from Proto-West Germanic *gaman, from Proto-Germanic *gamaną (amusement, pleasure, game), from *ga- (collective prefix) + *mann- (man); or alternatively from *ga- + a root from Proto-Indo-European *men- (to think, have in mind).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡɛm/

Noun

gem m inan

  1. (tennis) game (part of a set)

Declension

Further reading

  • gem in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • gem in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Romanian

Etymology 1

From English jam.

Noun

gem n (plural gemuri)

  1. jam (sweet mixture of fruit boiled with sugar)
Declension

Etymology 2

Verb

gem

  1. first-person singular present indicative of geme
  2. first-person singular present subjunctive of geme
  3. third-person plural present indicative of geme

Swedish

Etymology 1

The paper clip’s most common design was originally thought to be made by The Gem Manufacturing Company in Britain in the 1870s. More at paper clip.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡeːm/, /jeːm/

Noun

gem n

  1. a paper clip

Etymology 2

From English game

Noun

gem n

  1. (tennis) a game; part of a set

Declension

References

  • gem in Svenska Akademiens ordlista (SAOL)
  • gem in Svenska Akademiens ordbok (SAOB)

Volapük

Etymology

Perhaps borrowed from French germain.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡem/, [ɡem]

Noun

gem (nominative plural gems)

  1. sibling
    • 1949, “Lifajenäd brefik cifala: ‚Jakob Sprenger‛”, in Volapükagased pro Nedänapükans, issue 4, 13-14.
      ‚Jakob‛ äbinom cil mälid se gems vel: blods lul e sörs tel.

      Jakob was the sixth child out of seven siblings: five brothers and two sisters.

Declension

Hyponyms

  • blod (brother)
  • higem (brother)
  • jiblod (sister)
  • jigem (sister)
  • sör (sister)

Derived terms

  • (collective) gemef (brother(s) and/or sister(s))
  • (adjective) gemik (sibling)


English

Etymology

From Middle English stone, ston, stan, from Old English stān, from Proto-West Germanic *stain, from Proto-Germanic *stainaz (compare Dutch steen, German Stein, Danish and Swedish sten, Norwegian stein), from Proto-Indo-European *steyh₂- (to stiffen) (compare Russian стена́ (stená, wall), Ancient Greek στία (stía, pebble), στέαρ (stéar, tallow), Persian ستون(sotūn, pillar), Albanian shtëng (hardened or pressed matter), Sanskrit स्त्यायते (styāyate, it hardens)). Doublet of stein.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /stəʊn/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /stoʊn/
  • (General New Zealand) IPA(key): /stɐʉn/
  • Rhymes: -əʊn

Noun

stone (countable and uncountable, plural stones or stone) (see usage notes)

  1. (uncountable) A hard earthen substance that can form large rocks.
  2. A small piece of stone, a pebble.
  3. A gemstone, a jewel, especially a diamond.
  4. (Britain, plural: stone) A unit of mass equal to 14 pounds (≈6.3503 kilograms), formerly used for various commodities (wool, cheese, &c) but now principally used for personal weight
    • 1992 October 3, Edwina Currie, Diary:
      Weighed myself at the gym and have hit 10st 8lb, a sure sign of things getting out of control—so I can’t even console myself with a chocolate biscuit.
  5. (botany) The central part of some fruits, particularly drupes; consisting of the seed and a hard endocarp layer.
  6. (medicine) A hard, stone-like deposit.
  7. (board games) A playing piece made of any hard material, used in various board games such as backgammon, and go.
  8. A dull light grey or beige, like that of some stones.
  9. (curling) A 42-pound, precisely shaped piece of granite with a handle attached, which is bowled down the ice.
  10. A monument to the dead; a gravestone or tombstone.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Gray to this entry?)
  11. (obsolete) A mirror, or its glass.
  12. (obsolete) A testicle of an animal.
  13. (dated, printing) A stand or table with a smooth, flat top of stone, commonly marble, on which to arrange the pages of a book, newspaper, etc. before printing; also called imposing stone.

Usage notes

All countable senses use the plural stones except the British unit of mass, which uses the invariant plural stone.

Synonyms

  • (substance): rock
  • (small piece of stone): pebble
  • (unit of mass): petra
  • (of fruit): pip, pit
  • (hard stone-like deposit): calculus
  • (curling piece): rock

Descendants

  • Sranan Tongo: ston
  • Esperanto: ŝtono

Translations

Verb

stone (third-person singular simple present stones, present participle stoning, simple past and past participle stoned)

  1. (transitive) To pelt with stones, especially to kill by pelting with stones.
    She got stoned to death after they found her.
  2. (transitive) To wall with stones.
  3. (transitive) To remove a stone from (fruit etc.).
  4. (intransitive) To form a stone during growth, with reference to fruit etc.
  5. (transitive, slang) To intoxicate, especially with narcotics. (Usually in passive)
  6. (intransitive, Singapore, slang) To do nothing, to stare blankly into space and not pay attention when relaxing or when bored.
  7. (transitive) To lap with an abrasive stone to remove surface irregularities.

Synonyms

  • (pelt with stones): lapidate
  • (do nothing, just relaxing): chill, chillax, chill out, hang out, rilek
  • (do nothing, stare into space): daydream, veg out

Translations

Adjective

stone (not comparable)

  1. Constructed of stone.
    stone walls
    Synonym: (archaic) stonen
  2. Having the appearance of stone.
    stone pot
  3. Of a dull light grey or beige, like that of some stones.
  4. (African-American Vernacular) Used as an intensifier.
    She is one stone fox.
  5. (LGBT) Willing to give sexual pleasure but not to receive it.
    stone butch; stone femme
    Antonym: pillow princess

Translations

Adverb

stone (not comparable)

  1. As a stone (used with following adjective).
    My father is stone deaf. This soup is stone cold.
  2. (slang) Absolutely, completely (used with following adjectives).
    I went stone crazy after she left.
    I said the medication made my vision temporarily blurry, it did not make me stone blind.

Translations

Derived terms

See also

  • Appendix:Colors

Anagrams

  • ‘onest, ETNOs, Eston, SONET, notes, onest, onset, set on, seton, steno, steno-, tones

French

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ston/

Adjective

stone (plural stones)

  1. stoned (high on drugs)

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • ston, stan, stoon, stoone, stane, stoan

Etymology

From Old English stān, from Proto-West Germanic *stain, from Proto-Germanic *stainaz.

Pronunciation

  • (Early ME, Northern ME) IPA(key): /stɑːn/
  • IPA(key): /stɔːn/
  • Rhymes: -ɔːn

Noun

stone (plural stones or stone or (Early ME, rare) stonen)

  1. A stone, boulder, or pebble:
    1. A millstone or whetstone.
    2. A pebble used in a slingshot.
  2. A solid mass resembling stone, especially:
    1. A piece of hail, a hailstone
    2. A kidney stone or gallstone
    3. A pit (the hard seed of a fruit)
    4. A jewel or precious crystal
    5. (colloquial) A testicle.
  3. Stone as a material (especially in construction)
  4. A stone structure or monument, especially a tomb or tombstone.
  5. A stone (unit of mass)

Related terms

Descendants

  • English: stone (see there for further descendants)
  • Scots: stane
  • Yola: sthoan

References

  • “stōn, n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-04-05.

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