general vs oecumenical what difference

what is difference between general and oecumenical

English

Alternative forms

  • generall (chiefly archaic)

Etymology

From Middle English general, in turn from Anglo-Norman general, generall, Middle French general, and their source, Latin generālis, from genus (class, kind) + -ālis (-al).

Pronunciation

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /ˈd͡ʒɛnɹəl/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈd͡ʒɛnəɹəl/
  • Hyphenation: gene‧ral, gen‧er‧al

Adjective

general (comparative more general, superlative most general)

  1. Including or involving every part or member of a given or implied entity, whole etc.; as opposed to specific or particular. [from 13th c.]
  2. (sometimes postpositive) Applied to a person (as a postmodifier or a normal preceding adjective) to indicate supreme rank, in civil or military titles, and later in other terms; pre-eminent. [from 14th c.]
  3. Prevalent or widespread among a given class or area; common, usual. [from 14th c.]
  4. Not limited in use or application; applicable to the whole or every member of a class or category. [from 14th c.]
  5. Giving or consisting of only the most important aspects of something, ignoring minor details; indefinite. [from 16th c.]
  6. Not limited to a specific class; miscellaneous, concerned with all branches of a given subject or area. [from 16th c.]

Synonyms

  • (involving every part or member): broad, generic; see also Thesaurus:generic
  • (prevalent or widespread): typical; see also Thesaurus:common

Antonyms

  • (involving every part or member): particular, specific; see also Thesaurus:specific
  • (prevalent or widespread): abnormal, uncommon

Derived terms

Related terms

  • universal
  • common

Translations

Noun

general (countable and uncountable, plural generals)

  1. (now rare) A general fact or proposition; a generality. [from 16th c.]
  2. (military) The holder of a senior military title, originally designating the commander of an army and now a specific rank falling under field marshal (in the British army) and below general of the army or general of the air force in the US army and air forces. [from 16th c.]
  3. A great strategist or tactician. [from 16th c.]
  4. (Christianity) The head of certain religious orders, especially Dominicans or Jesuits. [from 16th c.]
  5. (nautical) A commander of naval forces; an admiral. [16th-18th c.]
  6. (colloquial, now historical) A general servant; a maid with no specific duties. [from 19th c.]
  7. (countable) A general anesthetic.
  8. (uncountable) General anesthesia.
  9. (uncountable, insurance) The general insurance industry.
Usage notes

When used as a title, it is always capitalized.

Example: General John Doe.

The rank corresponds to pay grade O-10. Abbreviations: GEN.

Coordinate terms

  • (insurance industry): health, life, pensions

Translations

See also

  • hetman

Verb

general (third-person singular simple present generals, present participle generalling or generaling, simple past and past participle generalled or generaled)

  1. To lead (soldiers) as a general.

Adverb

general (not comparable)

  1. (obsolete) In a general or collective manner or sense; in most cases; upon the whole.

Anagrams

  • enlarge, gleaner, reangle

Catalan

Etymology

From Latin generālis.

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central) IPA(key): /ʒə.nəˈɾal/
  • (Valencian) IPA(key): /d͡ʒe.neˈɾal/

Adjective

general (masculine and feminine plural generals)

  1. general

Noun

general m (plural generals, feminine generala)

  1. (military) general

Derived terms

Further reading

  • “general” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.
  • “general” in Gran Diccionari de la Llengua Catalana, Grup Enciclopèdia Catalana.
  • “general” in Diccionari normatiu valencià, Acadèmia Valenciana de la Llengua.
  • “general” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

Danish

Noun

general c (singular definite generalen, plural indefinite generaler)

  1. general

Inflection


Ladin

Adjective

general m (feminine singular generala, masculine plural generai, feminine plural generales)

  1. general

Middle English

Alternative forms

  • generall, generale

Etymology

From a mixture of Anglo-Norman general, Middle French general, and Latin generālis.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /dʒɛnəˈraːl/, /ˈdʒɛnəral/

Adjective

general

  1. universal, complete
  2. comprehensive, wide-ranging
  3. general, widely useable or applicable
  4. common, widely present

Descendants

  • English: general
  • Scots: general

References

  • “ǧenerāl, adj. & n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-04-01.

Noun

general (plural generals)

  1. genus, class, group

References

  • “ǧenerāl, adj. & n.”, in MED Online, Ann Arbor, Mich.: University of Michigan, 2007, retrieved 2018-04-01.

Norwegian Bokmål

Noun

general m (definite singular generalen, indefinite plural generaler, definite plural generalene)

  1. (military) a general

Derived terms

  • generalguvernør

Norwegian Nynorsk

Noun

general m (definite singular generalen, indefinite plural generalar, definite plural generalane)

  1. (military) a general

Derived terms

  • generalguvernør

Old French

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin generālis.

Noun

general m (oblique plural generaus or generax or generals, nominative singular generaus or generax or generals, nominative plural general)

  1. (military) general

Adjective

general m (oblique and nominative feminine singular generale)

  1. general (not limited in use or application; applicable to the whole or every member of a class or category)

Declension

Descendants

  • English: general
  • French: général

Portuguese

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin generālis. See also geral, from the same source.

Pronunciation

  • Hyphenation: ge‧ne‧ral
  • Rhymes: -al, -aw

Noun

general m (plural generais, feminine generala, feminine plural generalas)

  1. (military) general

Descendants

  • Tetum: jenerál

Further reading

  • “general” in Dicionário Priberam da Língua Portuguesa.

Romanian

Etymology

Borrowed from French général, from Latin generālis.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /d͡ʒe.neˈral/

Noun

general m (plural generali)

  1. general

Declension

Adjective

general m or n (feminine singular generală, masculine plural generali, feminine and neuter plural generale)

  1. general

Declension

Related terms


Serbo-Croatian

Etymology

From German General, from Latin generālis.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡeněraːl/
  • Hyphenation: ge‧ne‧ral

Noun

genèrāl m (Cyrillic spelling генѐра̄л)

  1. (military) general

Declension


Slovene

Etymology

From German General, from Latin generālis.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡɛnɛráːl/

Noun

generȃl m anim (female equivalent generȃlica or generȃlka)

  1. (military) general

Inflection


Spanish

Etymology

From Latin generālis.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /xeneˈɾal/, [xe.neˈɾal]

Adjective

general (plural generales)

  1. general

Derived terms

Noun

general m (plural generales, feminine generala, feminine plural generalas)

  1. (military) general

Descendants

  • Cebuano: heneral
  • Tagalog: heneral

Further reading

  • “general” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.

Swedish

Etymology

From German General, from Old French general, from Latin generālis.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /jɛn(ɛ)ˈrɑːl/

Noun

general c

  1. a general; a military title
  2. an Air Chief Marshal

Declension

Descendants

  • Finnish: kenraali

References



English

Adjective

oecumenical (not comparable)

  1. Alternative spelling of ecumenical

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