generalisation vs induction what difference

what is difference between generalisation and induction

English

Alternative forms

  • generalization (American, Oxford British English)

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -eɪʃən

Noun

generalisation (countable and uncountable, plural generalisations)

  1. The formulation of general concepts from specific instances by abstracting common properties.
  2. Inductive reasoning from detailed facts to general principles.

Antonyms

  • specialisation (specialization)

Translations



English

Etymology

From Old French induction, from Latin inductiō, from indūcō (I lead).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɪnˈdʌkʃən/
  • Rhymes: -ʌkʃən

Noun

induction (countable and uncountable, plural inductions)

  1. An act of inducting.
    • I know not you; nor am I well pleased to make this time, as the affair now stands, the induction of your acquaintance.
    1. A formal ceremony in which a person is appointed to an office or into military service.
    2. The process of showing a newcomer around a place where they will work or study.
  2. An act of inducing.
    1. (physics) Generation of an electric current by a varying magnetic field.
    2. (logic) Derivation of general principles from specific instances.
    3. (mathematics) A method of proof of a theorem by first proving it for a specific case (often an integer; usually 0 or 1) and showing that, if it is true for one case then it must be true for the next.
    4. (theater) Use of rumors to twist and complicate the plot of a play or to narrate in a way that does not have to state truth nor fact within the play.
    5. (biology) In developmental biology, the development of a feature from part of a formerly homogenous field of cells in response to a morphogen whose source determines the feature’s position and extent.
  3. (medicine) The process of inducing the birth process.
  4. (obsolete) An introduction.
    • 1619, Philip Massinger and Nathan Field, The Fatal Dowry
      This is but an induction: I’lldraw / The curtains of the tragedy hereafter.

Quotations

  • For quotations using this term, see Citations:induction.

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations


French

Etymology

From Latin inductio.

Noun

induction f (plural inductions)

  1. induction

Further reading

  • “induction” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

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