generalization vs induction what difference

what is difference between generalization and induction

English

Alternative forms

  • generalisation

Etymology

general +‎ -ization

Pronunciation

  • Rhymes: -eɪʃən

Noun

generalization (countable and uncountable, plural generalizations)

  1. The formulation of general concepts from specific instances by abstracting common properties.
    Synonyms: universalization; see also Thesaurus:generalization
    Antonyms: specialization; see also Thesaurus:specialization
  2. Inductive reasoning from detailed facts to general principles.
  3. An oversimplified or exaggerated conception, opinion, or image of the members of a group.
  4. (mathematics) A proof, axiom, problem, or definition which includes another’s cases, and also some additional cases.

See also

  • stereotype

Translations

Further reading

  • generalization at OneLook Dictionary Search


English

Etymology

From Old French induction, from Latin inductiō, from indūcō (I lead).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɪnˈdʌkʃən/
  • Rhymes: -ʌkʃən

Noun

induction (countable and uncountable, plural inductions)

  1. An act of inducting.
    • I know not you; nor am I well pleased to make this time, as the affair now stands, the induction of your acquaintance.
    1. A formal ceremony in which a person is appointed to an office or into military service.
    2. The process of showing a newcomer around a place where they will work or study.
  2. An act of inducing.
    1. (physics) Generation of an electric current by a varying magnetic field.
    2. (logic) Derivation of general principles from specific instances.
    3. (mathematics) A method of proof of a theorem by first proving it for a specific case (often an integer; usually 0 or 1) and showing that, if it is true for one case then it must be true for the next.
    4. (theater) Use of rumors to twist and complicate the plot of a play or to narrate in a way that does not have to state truth nor fact within the play.
    5. (biology) In developmental biology, the development of a feature from part of a formerly homogenous field of cells in response to a morphogen whose source determines the feature’s position and extent.
  3. (medicine) The process of inducing the birth process.
  4. (obsolete) An introduction.
    • 1619, Philip Massinger and Nathan Field, The Fatal Dowry
      This is but an induction: I’lldraw / The curtains of the tragedy hereafter.

Quotations

  • For quotations using this term, see Citations:induction.

Derived terms

Related terms

Translations


French

Etymology

From Latin inductio.

Noun

induction f (plural inductions)

  1. induction

Further reading

  • “induction” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Please follow and like us:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Social Share Buttons and Icons powered by Ultimatelysocial