generator vs source what difference

what is difference between generator and source

English

Etymology

From Latin, from past participle of genero (beget, father)

Noun

generator (plural generators)

  1. One who, or that which, generates, begets, causes, or produces.
    1. (chemistry) An apparatus in which vapour or gas is formed from a liquid or solid by means of heat or chemical process, as a steam boiler, gas retort etc.
    2. (music) The principal sound or sounds by which others are produced; the fundamental note or root of the common chord; — see also generating tone.
    3. (mathematics) An element of a group that is used in the presentation of the group: one of the elements from which the others can be inferred with the given relators.
    4. (geometry) One of the lines of a ruled surface; more generally, an element of some family of linear spaces.
    5. (programming) A subordinate piece of code which, given some initial parameters, will generate multiple output values on request.
  2. A piece of apparatus, equipment, etc, to convert or change energy from one form to another.
    1. Especially, a machine that converts mechanical energy into electrical energy.

Antonyms

  • (one which generates): extinguisher

Derived terms

  • steam generator
  • traffic generator
  • wind generator

Translations


Latin

Verb

generātor

  1. second-person singular future passive imperative of generō
  2. third-person singular future passive imperative of generō

References

  • generator in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • generator in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Latin generare

Noun

generator m (definite singular generatoren, indefinite plural generatorer, definite plural generatorene)

  1. a generator

Derived terms

  • vindgenerator

References

  • “generator” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Latin generare

Noun

generator m (definite singular generatoren, indefinite plural generatorar, definite plural generatorane)

  1. a generator

Derived terms

  • vindgenerator

References

  • “generator” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.


English

Etymology

From Middle English sours, from Old French sorse (rise, beginning, spring, source), from sors, past participle of sordre, sourdre, from Latin surgō (to rise), which is composed of sub- (up from below) +‎ regō (lead, rule), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *h₃réǵeti (to straighten; right), from the root *h₃reǵ-. See surge.

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /sɔɹs/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /sɔːs/
  • (rhotic, without the horsehoarse merger) IPA(key): /so(ː)ɹs/
  • (non-rhotic, without the horsehoarse merger) IPA(key): /soəs/
  • Rhymes: -ɔː(ɹ)s
  • Homophone: sauce (non-rhotic accents with the horse–hoarse merger)

Noun

source (plural sources)

  1. The person, place, or thing from which something (information, goods, etc.) comes or is acquired.
  2. Spring; fountainhead; wellhead; any collection of water on or under the surface of the ground in which a stream originates.
  3. A reporter’s informant.
  4. (computing) Source code.
  5. (electronics) The name of one terminal of a field effect transistor (FET).

Synonyms

  • wellspring

Hyponyms

Derived terms

Related terms

  • resource

Translations

See also

  • target

Verb

source (third-person singular simple present sources, present participle sourcing, simple past and past participle sourced)

  1. (chiefly US) To obtain or procure: used especially of a business resource.
  2. (transitive) To find information about (a quotation)’s source (from which it comes): to find a citation for.

Derived terms

  • (mainly US): sourcing
  • (mainly US): insourcing
  • (mainly US): outsourcing

Translations

Further reading

  • source in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • source in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.

Anagrams

  • ‘course, Couser, Crouse, Crusoe, cerous, coures, course, crouse

French

Etymology

From Old French sorse (rise, beginning, spring, source), from sors, past participle of sordre, sourdre, from Latin surgere (to rise). See surge.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /suʁs/

Noun

source f (plural sources)

  1. source, spring (of water)

Derived terms

  • code source
  • couler de source
  • eau de source
  • langue source
  • prendre sa source
  • source chaude

Descendants

  • Romanian: sursă

Verb

source

  1. inflection of sourcer:
    1. first-person singular/third-person singular present indicative/present subjunctive
    2. second-person singular imperative

Further reading

  • “source” in Trésor de la langue française informatisé (The Digitized Treasury of the French Language).

Anagrams

  • coeurs, cœurs
  • coures
  • course, coursé
  • écrous

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