genial vs kind what difference

what is difference between genial and kind

English

Etymology 1

From Middle French génial, from Latin geniālis (of or pertaining to marriage; festive, genial), from genius (guardian spirit) + -ālis.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈdʒiːnɪəl/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈdʒinjəl/, /-ni.əl/
  • Hyphenation: ge‧ni‧al

Adjective

genial (comparative more genial, superlative most genial)

  1. Friendly and cheerful.
  2. (especially of weather) Pleasantly mild and warm.
  3. Marked by genius.
    • 1826, Julius Hare, Guesses at Truth by Two Brothers
      Men of genius have so often attacht the highest value to their less genial works.
    • 2003, Laura Fermi, Gilberto Bernardini, Galileo and the Scientific Revolution, Courier Dover Publications, page 111 [1]:
      About fifty years later, in 1675, the Danish astronomer Ole Roemer (1644-1710) had the genial idea of using astronomical rather than terrestrial distances.
  4. (archaic) Contributing to, or concerned in, propagation or production; generative; procreative; productive.
    • Creator Venus, genial power of love.
  5. (obsolete) Belonging to one’s genius or natural character; native; natural; inborn.
Derived terms
  • congenial
Related terms
Translations

Etymology 2

From Ancient Greek γένειον (géneion, chin) + -al.

Pronunciation

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /dʒɪˈnʌɪəl/, /-ˈniːəl/
  • (General American) IPA(key): /dʒəˈnaɪəl/, /-ˈni.əl/
  • Hyphenation: ge‧ni‧al

Adjective

genial (not comparable)

  1. (anatomy) Relating to the chin; genian.

Anagrams

  • Eaglin, Ealing, Neglia, igneal, linage

Catalan

Etymology

Borrowed from Latin geniālis.

Pronunciation

  • (Balearic, Central) IPA(key): /ʒə.niˈal/
  • (Valencian) IPA(key): /d͡ʒe.niˈal/

Adjective

genial (masculine and feminine plural genials)

  1. genius
  2. brilliant, great

Derived terms

  • genialment

Related terms

  • geni
  • genialitat

Further reading

  • “genial” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.

German

Etymology

Shortening of earlier genialisch.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡeˈni̯aːl/
  • Rhymes: -aːl

Adjective

genial (comparative genialer, superlative am genialsten)

  1. genius, ingenious, genial (in the sense of genius)
  2. (colloquial) excellent
    Synonyms: klasse, hervorragend

Declension

Derived terms

  • kongenial

Further reading

  • “genial” in Duden online

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Latin genialis

Adjective

genial (neuter singular genialt, definite singular and plural geniale)

  1. ingenious, brilliant

Related terms

  • geni

References

  • “genial” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Latin genialis

Adjective

genial (neuter singular genialt, definite singular and plural geniale)

  1. ingenious, brilliant

Related terms

  • geni

References

  • “genial” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Portuguese

Adjective

genial m or f (plural geniais, comparable)

  1. genial (marked by genius)
  2. genius (very clever)

Romanian

Etymology

From French génial.

Adjective

genial m or n (feminine singular genială, masculine plural geniali, feminine and neuter plural geniale)

  1. (literally) ingenious, characteristic of a genius
  2. (informal) great, fantastic, awesome

Declension


Spanish

Etymology

From Latin geniālis (of or relating to marriage; festive, genial), from genius (guardian spirit) + -ālis.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /xeˈnjal/, [xeˈnjal]

Adjective

genial (plural geniales)

  1. great, cool, neat
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:guay
  2. splendid, gorgeous
    Synonym: espléndido
  3. ingenious
    Synonym: ingenioso
  4. genial, pleasant

Derived terms

  • genialmente

Related terms

  • genialidad
  • genio

Further reading

  • “genial” in Diccionario de la lengua española, Vigésima tercera edición, Real Academia Española, 2014.


English

Pronunciation

  • enPR: kīnd, IPA(key): /kaɪnd/
  • Rhymes: -aɪnd

Etymology 1

From Middle English kynde, kunde, cunde, icunde, from Old English cynd (generation, kind, nature, race), ġecynd, from Proto-Germanic *kundiz, *gakundiz, related to *kunją. Cognate with Icelandic kind (race, species, kind). Doublet of gens, genesis, and jati. See also kin.

Alternative forms

  • kinde, kynd, kynde (obsolete)

Noun

kind (plural kinds)

  1. A type, race or category; a group of entities that have common characteristics such that they may be grouped together.
  2. A makeshift or otherwise atypical specimen.
    • 1884, Mark Twain, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Chapter VIII
      I got my traps out of the canoe and made me a nice camp in the thick woods. I made a kind of a tent out of my blankets to put my things under so the rain couldn’t get at them.
  3. (archaic) One’s inherent nature; character, natural disposition.
  4. (archaic) Family, lineage.
    • “She Moved through the Fair” (traditional Irish folk song)
      My young love said to me, My mother won’t mind
      And my father won’t slight you for your lack of kind.
  5. (archaic) Manner.
  6. Goods or services used as payment, as e.g. in barter.
    • 1691, John Dryden, Prologue to King Arthur
      Some of you, on pure instinct of nature, / Are led by kind t’admire your fellow-creature.
  7. Equivalent means used as response to an action.
  8. (Christianity) Each of the two elements of the communion service, bread and wine.
Usage notes

In sense “goods or services” or “equivalent means”, used almost exclusively with “in” in expression in kind.

Synonyms
  • genre
  • sort
  • type
  • derivative

(1) and/or (2)

  • generation
  • offspring
  • child
  • See also Thesaurus:class
Derived terms
Related terms
Translations

Etymology 2

From Middle English kinde, kunde, kende, from Old English cynde, ġecynde (innate, natural, native), from Old English cynd, ġecynd (nature, kind).

Alternative forms

  • kinde (obsolete)

Adjective

kind (comparative kinder, superlative kindest)

  1. Having a benevolent, courteous, friendly, generous, gentle, liberal, sympathetic, or warm-hearted nature or disposition, marked by consideration for – and service to – others.
  2. Affectionate.
    • 1770, Oliver Goldsmith, The Deserted Village
      Yet was he kind, or if severe in aught, / The love he bore to learning was in fault.
  3. Favorable.
  4. Mild, gentle, forgiving
  5. Gentle; tractable; easily governed.
  6. (obsolete) Characteristic of the species; belonging to one’s nature; natural; native.
    • c. 1385, William Langland, Piers Plowman, I:
      Ȝet haue I no kynde knowing quod I · ȝet mote ȝe kenne me better.
    • it becommeth sweeter than it should be, and loseth the kind tast.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Chaucer to this entry?)
Synonyms
  • See also Thesaurus:affectionate
Derived terms
Translations

Further reading

  • Kind in the Encyclopædia Britannica (11th edition, 1911)

Anagrams

  • DINK, dink

Afrikaans

Etymology

From Dutch kind, from Middle Dutch kint, from Old Dutch kint, from Proto-Germanic *kindą (offspring), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵenh₁tóm.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kənt/

Noun

kind (plural kinders)

  1. child

Anagrams

  • dink

Danish

Etymology

From Old Norse kinn, from Proto-Germanic *kinnuz, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵénu- (cheek). Compare Swedish kind, Norwegian and Icelandic kinn, Low German and German Kinn, Dutch kin, English chin.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ken/, [kʰenˀ]

Noun

kind c (singular definite kinden, plural indefinite kinder)

  1. cheek

Inflection


Dutch

Etymology

From Middle Dutch kint, from Old Dutch kint, from Proto-West Germanic *kind (offspring), from Proto-Germanic *kindą (offspring), from Proto-Indo-European *ǵenh₁tóm (that which is produced, that which is given birth to), related to *ǵn̥h₁tós (produced, given birth), from *ǵenh₁- (to produce, to give birth).

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /kɪnt/
  • Hyphenation: kind
  • Rhymes: -ɪnt

Noun

kind n (plural kinderen or kinders, diminutive kindje n or kindertje n or kindeken n or kindelijn n)

  1. child, kid, non-adult human
  2. first-degree descendant, still a minor or irrespective of age
    In sommige patriarchale tradities blijven kinderen levenslang onvoorwaardelijk onderworpen aan het vaderlijk gezag, zoals aanvankelijk in het Oude Rome, in andere houdt een zoon op kind te zijn door zijn eigen gezin te stichten

    In certain patriarchal traditions, children remain subject to unconditional paternal authority for life, as originally in Ancient Rome, in other ones a son ceases to be a child by founding his own family
    Synonyms: afstammeling, nakomeling, telg
  3. (figuratively) product of influence, breeding etc.

Usage notes

  • The normal plural is kinderen (a double plural combining the endings -er (archaic) and -en, also found in a few other neuter nouns). The form kinders is heard colloquially, often also humorously.
  • In compounds, the word can take the form kinder- or kind- as a tail. The former is used more often, however.
  • The dimunitive kindelijn is now archaic, but can still be found in some fossilized songs and religious texts.

Derived terms

See also

  • dochter
  • zoon
  • blaag

Descendants

  • Afrikaans: kind
  • Jersey Dutch: känt
  • Negerhollands: kind, kint, kin, ken
  • Skepi Creole Dutch: kente, kinte

Icelandic

Etymology

From Old Norse kind, from Proto-Germanic *kinþiz, cognate with Latin gēns (clan, tribe). The sense of “sheep” is derived from the compound sauðkind, literally “sheep-kind”.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /cʰɪnt/
  • Rhymes: -ɪnt

Noun

kind f (genitive singular kindar, nominative plural kindur or kindir)

  1. (obsolete) race, kind, kin
  2. a sheep (especially a ewe)
  3. (dated) used as a term of disparagement for a girl (or woman)

Declension

Standard declension:

Alternative declension, used primarily with “race, kind, kin”:

Synonyms

  • (sheep): rolla, sauðkind

Derived terms

  • kindarlegur
  • mannkind
  • sauðkind

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Old Norse kind f, from Proto-Germanic *kinþiz, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵénh₁tis. Akin to English kind.

Noun

kind m (definite singular kinden, indefinite plural kindar, definite plural kindane)
kind n (definite singular kindet, indefinite plural kind, definite plural kinda)

  1. a child in a cradle

References

  • “kind” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.

Old Norse

Etymology

From Proto-Germanic *kinþiz. Compare Latin gēns (clan, tribe).

Noun

kind f (genitive kindar, plural kindir or kindr)

  1. race, kind, kin
  2. creature, being

Declension

Derived terms

  • mannkind
  • sauðkind

Descendants

  • Icelandic: kind f

References

  • kind in Geir T. Zoëga (1910) A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, Oxford: Clarendon Press

Old Saxon

Etymology

From Proto-West Germanic *kind (child).

Noun

kind n

  1. child

Declension



Descendants

  • Middle Low German: kind, kint, kynd
    • Dutch Low Saxon: kind, kiend, keend
    • German Low German: Kind
    • Old Frisian: kind
      • West Frisian: kyn

Swedish

Etymology

From Old Norse kinn, from Proto-Germanic *kinnuz, from Proto-Indo-European *ǵénu- (cheek). Compare Danish kind, Norwegian and Icelandic kinn, German Kinn, Dutch kin, English chin.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɕɪnd/

Noun

kind c

  1. (anatomy) cheek; a part of the face.

Declension


Zealandic

Etymology

From Middle Dutch kint

Noun

kind n (plural kinders)

  1. child

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