genius vs wizardry what difference

what is difference between genius and wizardry

English

Etymology

From Latin genius (inborn nature; a tutelary deity of a person or place; wit, brilliance), from gignō (to beget, produce), Old Latin genō, from the Proto-Indo-European root *ǵenh₁-. Doublet of genio. See also genus.

Pronunciation

  • (General American) IPA(key): /ˈdʒin.jəs/, /ˈdʒi.ni.əs/
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈdʒiː.nɪəs/
  • Rhymes: -iːniəs

Noun

genius (plural geniuses or genii)

  1. Someone possessing extraordinary intelligence or skill; especially somebody who has demonstrated this by a creative or original work in science, music, art etc.
    Synonyms: see Thesaurus:genius
    Antonym: idiot
  2. Extraordinary mental capacity.
  3. Inspiration, a mental leap, an extraordinary creative process.
  4. (Roman mythology) The tutelary deity or spirit of a place or person.
    • 1715, Edward Burnett Tylor, Primitive Culture
      We talk of genius still, but with thought how changed! The genius of Augustus was a tutelary demon, to be sworn by and to receive offerings on an altar as a deity.
    Synonyms: tutelary deity; see also Thesaurus:spirit

Related terms

Translations

Adjective

genius (not comparable)

  1. (informal) ingenious, brilliant, very clever, or original.

Translations

Further reading

  • genius in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.
  • genius in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • “genius” in Raymond Williams, Keywords (revised), 1983, Fontana Press, page 143.

Anagrams

  • Seguin

Indonesian

Alternative forms

  • jenius

Etymology

Learned borrowing from Latin genius (inborn nature; a tutelary deity of a person or place; wit, brilliance), from gignō (to beget, produce), Old Latin genō, from the Proto-Indo-European root *ǵenh₁-. Doublet of enjin, insinyur, and zeni.

Pronunciation

  • (standard) IPA(key): [ɡeˈniʊs]
  • (common) IPA(key): [dʒeˈniʊs]
  • Hyphenation: gé‧ni‧us

Adjective

genius

  1. genius: ingenious, brilliant, very clever, or original.

Affixed terms

Further reading

  • “genius” in Kamus Besar Bahasa Indonesia (KBBI) Daring, Jakarta: Badan Pengembangan dan Pembinaan Bahasa, Kementerian Pendidikan dan Kebudayaan Republik Indonesia, 2016.

Latin

Etymology

Ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *ǵenh₁- (to beget), perhaps through Old Latin genō (to beget, give birth; to produce, cause). Comparisons with Aramaic ܓܢܝܐ(ginnaya, tutelary deity), and with Arabic جِنّ(jinn, jinn, spirit, demon) and جَنِين(janīn, embryo, germ), suggest the effects of an older substrate word.

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈɡe.ni.us/, [ˈɡɛniʊs̠]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈd͡ʒe.ni.us/, [ˈd͡ʒɛːnius]

Noun

genius m (genitive geniī or genī); second declension

  1. the deity or guardian spirit of a person, place, etc.; a daemon, a daimon (cf. Ancient Greek δαίμων (daímōn))
  2. an inborn nature or innate character, especially (though not exclusively) as endowed by a personal (especially tutelar) spirit or deity.
  3. (with respect to the enjoyment of life) the spirit of social enjoyment, fondness for good living, taste, appetite, inclinations
  4. (of the intellect) wit, talents, genius (rare)

Declension

Second-declension noun.

1Found in older Latin (until the Augustan Age).

Quotations

  • Catullus[,] Tibullus and Pervigilium Veneris, 1921, page 328f. containing Albius Tibullus III, XI, 9f. = IV, V, 9f. with a translation into English by J. P. Postgate:
    magne Geni, cape tura libens votisque faveto,
    si modo, cum de me cogitat, ille calet.

    Great Genius, take this incense with a will, and smile upon my prayer, if only when he thinks on me his pulse beats high.

Descendants

References

  • genius in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • genius in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • genius in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • genius in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • genius in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper’s Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • genius in William Smith, editor (1848) A Dictionary of Greek Biography and Mythology, London: John Murray
  • genius in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin

Norwegian Bokmål

Etymology

From Latin genius.

Noun

genius m (definite singular geniusen, indefinite plural genier, definite plural geniene)

  1. genius

References

  • “genius” in The Bokmål Dictionary.

Norwegian Nynorsk

Etymology

From Latin genius.

Noun

genius m (definite singular geniusen, indefinite plural geniusar, definite plural geniusane)

  1. genius

References

  • “genius” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.


English

Etymology

wizard +‎ -ry

Noun

wizardry (countable and uncountable, plural wizardries)

  1. The art of a wizard; sorcery.
  2. Something, such as an advanced technology, that gives the appearance of magic.
  3. Great ability in some specified field.
    He used his computing wizardry to automate the search-and-replace process.
Translations

See also

  • wizardcraft
  • warlockry
  • sorcery
  • witchcraft
  • hexcraft
  • spellcraft
  • spellcasting
  • thaumaturgy

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