gentile vs goy what difference

what is difference between gentile and goy

English

Alternative forms

  • Gentile

Etymology

Borrowed from French gentil (gentile), from Latin gentīlis (of or belonging to the same people or nation), a semantic loan from Hebrew גוי‎, morphologically from gēns (clan; tribe; people, family) + adjective suffix -īlis (-ile). Doublet of gentle and genteel. See also gens, gender, genus, and generation.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈd͡ʒɛntaɪl/
  • Rhymes: -aɪl
  • Hyphenation: gen‧tile

Adjective

gentile (not comparable)

  1. Non-Jewish.
  2. Heathen, pagan.
  3. Relating to a clan, tribe, or nation; clannish, tribal, national.
  4. Of or pertaining to a gens or several gentes.
  5. (grammar) Of a part of speech such as an adjective, noun or verb: relating to a particular city, nation or country.

Derived terms

  • gentilic
  • gentilical
  • gentilically
  • gentilicism

Related terms

  • genteel

Translations

Noun

gentile (plural gentiles)

  1. A non-Jewish person.
  2. (grammar) A noun derived from a proper noun which denotes something belonging to or coming from a particular city, nation, or country.

Hypernyms

  • (grammar): noun

Translations

See also

  • (grammar): patronymic

Italian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /d͡ʒenˈti.le/

Etymology 1

Borrowed from Latin gentīlis.

Adjective

gentile (plural gentili, superlative gentilissimo)

  1. kind, courteous
  2. gentle
  3. lovely
Derived terms
Related terms
Further reading
  • gentile1 in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell’Enciclopedia Italiana

Etymology 2

From Latin gentīlis (heathen, pagan).

Noun

gentile m (plural gentili)

  1. gentile (a non-Jewish person)
Derived terms
  • gentilesco
  • gentilesimo
Related terms
  • gentilità

Adjective

gentile (plural gentili)

  1. (literary) gentile (non-Jewish)
Further reading
  • gentile2 in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell’Enciclopedia Italiana

Latin

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ɡenˈtiː.le/, [ɡɛn̪ˈt̪iːɫ̪ɛ]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /d͡ʒenˈti.le/, [d͡ʒɛn̪ˈt̪iːlɛ]

Adjective

gentīle

  1. nominative/accusative/vocative neuter singular of gentīlis

References

  • gentile in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)

Swedish

Adjective

gentile

  1. absolute definite natural masculine singular of gentil.


English

Alternative forms

  • Goy
  • goi, Goi

Etymology

Borrowed from Yiddish גוי(goy, gentile), from Hebrew גּוֹי(goi, nation).

Compare Exodus 19:6: ממלכת כהנים וגוי קדוש (mamlekhet kohanim wegoy qadosh, [] a kingdom of priests and a holy nation) (referring to the Jewish people). The word goy technically refers not to non-Jews, but rather to a nation per se; the Jews are said to constitute a “goy”. But through common usage – namely referring to “the [other non-Jewish] nations” – the word came to colloquially refer to non-Jews.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ɡɔɪ/
  • Rhymes: -ɔɪ

Noun

goy (plural goyim or goys or goyem)

  1. A non-Jew, a gentile. (See usage notes)
    Synonyms: akum, gentile, shegetz, shkotz
    Hyponym: (female) shiksa

Usage notes

This noun is sometimes taken to be offensive; speakers wishing to avoid offense may prefer the term gentile (sometimes capitalized as Gentile) or simply non-Jew.

Derived terms

  • anti-goy
  • antigoyism
  • anti-goyish
  • goyish
  • shabbos goy

Translations

Anagrams

  • ygo

Anguthimri

Noun

goy

  1. (Mpakwithi) buck wallaby

References

  • Terry Crowley, The Mpakwithi dialect of Anguthimri (1981), page 186

Ladino

Etymology

From Hebrew גוי‎.

Noun

goy m (Latin spelling, Hebrew spelling גוי‎, plural goyim, feminine goya)

  1. goy, gentile, non-Jew

Portuguese

Noun

goy m, f (plural goys)

  1. Alternative spelling of gói

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