gentile vs infidel what difference

what is difference between gentile and infidel

English

Alternative forms

  • Gentile

Etymology

Borrowed from French gentil (gentile), from Latin gentīlis (of or belonging to the same people or nation), a semantic loan from Hebrew גוי‎, morphologically from gēns (clan; tribe; people, family) + adjective suffix -īlis (-ile). Doublet of gentle and genteel. See also gens, gender, genus, and generation.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈd͡ʒɛntaɪl/
  • Rhymes: -aɪl
  • Hyphenation: gen‧tile

Adjective

gentile (not comparable)

  1. Non-Jewish.
  2. Heathen, pagan.
  3. Relating to a clan, tribe, or nation; clannish, tribal, national.
  4. Of or pertaining to a gens or several gentes.
  5. (grammar) Of a part of speech such as an adjective, noun or verb: relating to a particular city, nation or country.

Derived terms

  • gentilic
  • gentilical
  • gentilically
  • gentilicism

Related terms

  • genteel

Translations

Noun

gentile (plural gentiles)

  1. A non-Jewish person.
  2. (grammar) A noun derived from a proper noun which denotes something belonging to or coming from a particular city, nation, or country.

Hypernyms

  • (grammar): noun

Translations

See also

  • (grammar): patronymic

Italian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /d͡ʒenˈti.le/

Etymology 1

Borrowed from Latin gentīlis.

Adjective

gentile (plural gentili, superlative gentilissimo)

  1. kind, courteous
  2. gentle
  3. lovely
Derived terms
Related terms
Further reading
  • gentile1 in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell’Enciclopedia Italiana

Etymology 2

From Latin gentīlis (heathen, pagan).

Noun

gentile m (plural gentili)

  1. gentile (a non-Jewish person)
Derived terms
  • gentilesco
  • gentilesimo
Related terms
  • gentilità

Adjective

gentile (plural gentili)

  1. (literary) gentile (non-Jewish)
Further reading
  • gentile2 in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell’Enciclopedia Italiana

Latin

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ɡenˈtiː.le/, [ɡɛn̪ˈt̪iːɫ̪ɛ]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /d͡ʒenˈti.le/, [d͡ʒɛn̪ˈt̪iːlɛ]

Adjective

gentīle

  1. nominative/accusative/vocative neuter singular of gentīlis

References

  • gentile in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)

Swedish

Adjective

gentile

  1. absolute definite natural masculine singular of gentil.


English

Etymology

First attested 1460, from Middle French infidèle, from Latin īnfidēlis (unfaithful), from in- (not) + fidēlis (faithful). See fidelity.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈɪn.fə.dl̩/, /ˈɪn.fə.ˌdɛl/

Adjective

infidel (comparative more infidel, superlative most infidel)

  1. Rejecting a specific religion.
  2. Of, characteristic of, or relating to unbelievers or unbelief.
    • 1881 — Ernestine Rose, A Defence of Atheism, J.P. Mendum, page 20
      But not only have the priests tried to make the very term Atheism odious, as if it would destroy all of good and beautiful in nature, but some of the reformers, not having the moral courage to avow their own sentiments, wishing to be popular, fearing lest their reforms would be considered Infidel, (as all reforms assuredly are), shield themselves from the stigma, by joining in the tirade against Atheism, and associate it with everything that is vile, with the crime of slavery, the corrup­tions of the Church, and all the vices imaginable.

Noun

infidel (plural infidels)

  1. (now usually derogatory) One who does not believe in a certain religion.
    • 1779, Vicesimus Knox, On the Prevalence of Religious Scepticism
      The infidel writer is a greater enemy to society.
    • 2005, George W. Braswell, Islam and America: Answers to the 31 Most-asked Questions (page 33)
      Some Muslims are taught that non-Muslims are infidels and are to be shunned.
  2. (now usually derogatory) One who does not believe in a certain principle.
  3. (now usually derogatory) One with no religious beliefs.

Synonyms

  • unbeliever
  • nonbeliever, non-believer
  • disbeliever
  • (one with no religious beliefs): atheist

Related terms

  • fidelity

Translations

Anagrams

  • infield, infiled

Catalan

Etymology

From Latin īnfidēlis (unfaithful).

Adjective

infidel (masculine and feminine plural infidels)

  1. unfaithful
    Antonym: fidel

Derived terms

  • infidelment

Related terms

  • infidelitat

Noun

infidel m or f (plural infidels)

  1. infidel

Further reading

  • “infidel” in Diccionari de la llengua catalana, segona edició, Institut d’Estudis Catalans.
  • “infidel” in Gran Diccionari de la Llengua Catalana, Grup Enciclopèdia Catalana.
  • “infidel” in Diccionari normatiu valencià, Acadèmia Valenciana de la Llengua.
  • “infidel” in Diccionari català-valencià-balear, Antoni Maria Alcover and Francesc de Borja Moll, 1962.

Romanian

Etymology

From French infidèle, from Latin infidelis.

Adjective

infidel m or n (feminine singular infidelă, masculine plural infideli, feminine and neuter plural infidele)

  1. unfaithful

Declension


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