gentile vs pagan what difference

what is difference between gentile and pagan

English

Alternative forms

  • Gentile

Etymology

Borrowed from French gentil (gentile), from Latin gentīlis (of or belonging to the same people or nation), a semantic loan from Hebrew גוי‎, morphologically from gēns (clan; tribe; people, family) + adjective suffix -īlis (-ile). Doublet of gentle and genteel. See also gens, gender, genus, and generation.

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈd͡ʒɛntaɪl/
  • Rhymes: -aɪl
  • Hyphenation: gen‧tile

Adjective

gentile (not comparable)

  1. Non-Jewish.
  2. Heathen, pagan.
  3. Relating to a clan, tribe, or nation; clannish, tribal, national.
  4. Of or pertaining to a gens or several gentes.
  5. (grammar) Of a part of speech such as an adjective, noun or verb: relating to a particular city, nation or country.

Derived terms

  • gentilic
  • gentilical
  • gentilically
  • gentilicism

Related terms

  • genteel

Translations

Noun

gentile (plural gentiles)

  1. A non-Jewish person.
  2. (grammar) A noun derived from a proper noun which denotes something belonging to or coming from a particular city, nation, or country.

Hypernyms

  • (grammar): noun

Translations

See also

  • (grammar): patronymic

Italian

Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /d͡ʒenˈti.le/

Etymology 1

Borrowed from Latin gentīlis.

Adjective

gentile (plural gentili, superlative gentilissimo)

  1. kind, courteous
  2. gentle
  3. lovely
Derived terms
Related terms
Further reading
  • gentile1 in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell’Enciclopedia Italiana

Etymology 2

From Latin gentīlis (heathen, pagan).

Noun

gentile m (plural gentili)

  1. gentile (a non-Jewish person)
Derived terms
  • gentilesco
  • gentilesimo
Related terms
  • gentilità

Adjective

gentile (plural gentili)

  1. (literary) gentile (non-Jewish)
Further reading
  • gentile2 in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell’Enciclopedia Italiana

Latin

Pronunciation

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ɡenˈtiː.le/, [ɡɛn̪ˈt̪iːɫ̪ɛ]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /d͡ʒenˈti.le/, [d͡ʒɛn̪ˈt̪iːlɛ]

Adjective

gentīle

  1. nominative/accusative/vocative neuter singular of gentīlis

References

  • gentile in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)

Swedish

Adjective

gentile

  1. absolute definite natural masculine singular of gentil.


English

Etymology

From Middle English pagan (adjective and noun), from Latin pāgānus (rural, rustic”, later “civilian). The meaning “not (Judeo-)Christian” arose in Vulgar Latin, probably from the 4th century. It is unclear whether this usage is derived primarily from the “rustic” or from the “civilian” meaning, which in Roman army jargon meant ‘clumsy’. As a self-designation of neopagans attested since 1990.

Pronunciation

  • enPR: pā’gən, IPA(key): /ˈpeɪɡən/
  • Rhymes: -eɪɡən

Adjective

pagan (not comparable)

  1. Relating to, characteristic of religions that differ from main world religions.
    Many converted societies transformed their pagan deities into saints.
  2. (by extension, derogatory) Savage, immoral, uncivilized, wild.

Usage notes

  • When referring to modern paganism, the term is now often capitalized, like other terms referring to religions.

Synonyms

  • (adhering to a non-main world religion): heathen
  • (uncivilized): barbarian, barbaric (pejorative)

Antonyms

  • (religion):

Hyponyms

  • pantheistic
  • neo-pagan

Derived terms

  • paganism
  • neopagan
  • paganly

Translations

Noun

pagan (plural pagans)

  1. A person not adhering to a main world religion; a follower of a pantheistic or nature-worshipping religion.
    This community has a surprising number of pagans.
  2. (by extension, derogatory) An uncivilized or unsocialized person.
  3. (by extension, derogatory) An unruly, badly educated child.

Synonyms

  • (heathen): paynim
  • (uncivilised): philistine, savage
  • (child): brat

Derived terms

  • neo-pagan

Related terms

  • peasant
  • paynim

Translations

See also

  • heretic
  • infidel

References

Anagrams

  • panga

Asturian

Verb

pagan

  1. third-person plural present subjunctive of pagar

Cebuano

Pronunciation

  • Hyphenation: pa‧gan

Verb

pagan

  1. to embroil; to draw into a situation; to cause to be involved
  2. to implicate; to connect or involve in an unfavorable or criminal way with something
  3. to fall victim to a friendly fire
  4. (military) to fall victim as collateral damage
  5. to be hit by a stray bullet
  6. to get caught in a crossfire
  7. (games, of marbles) to hit the adjacent marble with the target marble

Quotations

For quotations using this term, see Citations:pagan.


Estonian

Etymology

Ultimately from Latin paganus, through either Old East Slavic поганъ (poganŭ) or directly from Latin, through the German crusaders. Cognate to Finnish pakana.

Noun

pagan (genitive pagana, partitive paganat)

  1. pagan, heathen
  2. a devil, an evil spirit

Declension

Derived terms

  • vanapagan

Interjection

pagan

  1. damn, darn, heck

Galician

Verb

pagan

  1. third-person plural present indicative of pagar

Old High German

Verb

pāgan

  1. (Bavaria) Alternative form of bāgan

Spanish

Verb

pagan

  1. Second-person plural (ustedes) present indicative form of pagar.
  2. Third-person plural (ellos, ellas, also used with ustedes?) present indicative form of pagar.

Volapük

Etymology

From pag (paganism) +‎ -an.

Noun

pagan (nominative plural pagans)

  1. (Volapük Nulik) pagan, gentile

Declension


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